Out of This World Reads and Far Out Activities

Are you looking for a story that will transport you to another place and time? Then don't hesitate to jump on board with these eBooks and activities. You just may end up creating a robot to do your chores.

In Sanity & Tallulah by Molly Brooks, an illegally created, three-headed kitten is running loose on the space station the girls call home. What will it take for them to catch the kitten before it gets too out of control - and stay out of trouble in the process? After reading the book, you can use materials you have at home to design a three-headed kitten trap. How could you lure it in? How could you safely capture it?

When Jimbo and Charlie bug the staff room in Boom! by Mark Haddon, they hear their teachers talking in a secret language. Obviously, they must be aliens! Can Jimbo and Charlie figure out what is going on before the teachers put their evil plan into action? After reading the book, try to create your own secret language. Can you create a new pattern of letters or use words you already know in a different way?

Something strange is happening at Stately Academy in Secret Coders by Gene Luen Yang. What is with all the spooky buildings and why do the birds have so many eyes? Puzzles and mysteries keep popping up around the school and students Hopper and Eni are determined to solve them. Do you want to help them? After reading the book, learn how to code with the author.

In John Scieszka's Frank Einstein and the Antimatter Motor, boy genius Frank Einstein accidentally brings his robot creations, Klink and Klank, to life when they are struck by lightning in his garage. Frank is absolutely thrilled with this situation until his archnemesis, T. Edison, steals the robots for his own doomsday plan. After reading the book, design a robot to do your least favorite chore. How will the robot accomplish the task?

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