Train Journeys

In Chicago, we're used to the train rattling and roaring through our neighborhoods and downtown. Between the Pink, Blue, Brown, Red, Green, Orange, Metra and South Shore commuter trains, we can travel all over the city and its suburbs. But did you know that Chicago is also considered a national railway center?

In addition to the CTA, there are major railways coming in and out of the city that stretch all across Illinois and the U.S. to carry all kinds of cargo, including people. If you're curious to know more about the history of Chicago railroads, check out Chicago.

With gorgeous illustrations and interesting anecdotes, The Iron Road in the Prairie State tells how railroads impacted Chicago's economy and growth.

Traveling cross-country by train can be a unique experience. When I was in high school, I took a long train ride from Chicago to Boston, listening to music, putting my legs up or playing cards with my family and conversing with strangers; I remember looking out the window while eating in the dining car, and though the food wasn't memorable (or even good), the view was quite scenic.

Ride along with other teen travelers in the following stories:

Rosalind finds herself trapped on the world's first transatlantic underwater railway in The Transatlantic Conspiracy, a steampunk mystery filled with intrigue and murder.

In Devil and the Bluebird, Blue makes a deal with the devil to save her sister's soul and sets out on an epic journey to find her, hopping freight trains and making friends along the way.

Find more train novels for teens here.

What's the most interesting thing you've seen on the train? Are there folks you've met in your travels that have been unforgettable? Share some of your train adventures in our Teen Chicago Travel Guide, opens a new window or on social media with #cplteens.

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