Going on a Chapter Book Treasure Hunt

March 17 is St. Patrick's Day. Traditionally a celebration of the life of St. Patrick, this holiday has morphed into a celebration of all things Irish. In the U.S., Irish symbols of luck like shamrocks or leprechauns and their pot of gold are closely associated with the holiday. One thing is well known about leprechauns: these fairies and their treasures are hard to find! But you don't have to celebrate the holiday to enjoy a good hunt for treasure. Dig into one of these stories featuring kids on a quest to find something amazing.

The Parker Inheritance: Join Candice as she moves back to her mother's hometown which is not a treasure for her. Until she finds a puzzle in a letter from her grandmother and tries to solve it with help from new friend Brandon. Will they find the treasure it promises or just learn history? Either way, it's a treasure hunt!

Holes: Stanley Yelnats is in for a bad time, sent away to a camp for bad boys for a crime he didn't do. He is forced to dig holes under the hot sun of Camp Green Lake. But what if the holes are about more than punishment and more about hidden treasure?

Charlie Thorne and the Last Equation: What if Einstein left a secret last equation and 12-year-old super genius Charlie Thorne is the only one who can solve it? Follow Charlie on her first amazing adventure, full of action, mathematical equations and mystery. Oh, and of course, possible treasure!

Notorious: Keenan is recovering from tuberculosis in his dad's backyard in the sleepy, weird town of Centerlight, Michigan when ZeeBee alerts him to a hunt for gold left by mobsters. While the town is fictional, you'll recognize the mobsters and the excitement of trying to find something hidden for many years.

Want to learn more about the origins of St. Patrick's Day? Jade tells you all about it in her blog. 

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