Crazy for You: Sweet Valentine’s Day Reads for Kids

Flowers shaped like hearts
Source: Peggy2012creativelenz, Flickr

Love is in the air this month with Valentine's Day close at hand. From sweet treats to red hearts, it's a time when people share feelings of love, affection and friendship with one another. Valentine's Day offers some warmth and happiness in an otherwise dreary season. This love-filled day is the perfect time to enjoy these deliciously adorable books with your kids.

Worm Loves Worm is a simple picture book about two worms who love each other. It doesn't matter who wears the dress or who wears the tux; these two just want to get married. They have some wonderful friends who fuss over traditions and worry about flowers and rings and dancing. In the end, it doesn't matter that traditions are not followed because Worm loves Worm.

Percy wonders if there will be any valentines for him in A Valentine for Percy. He is late to the party in Vicarstown because there is a blizzard and he must plow the snow. Will he be too late? This beginning chapter book is great for children who are starting to read on their own.

In Dear Bunny, two love-struck bunnies are too shy to talk to one another, so they each decide to write the other a letter. The letters, however, are left in a log and used as bedding by a family of mice. Luckily the mice make amends and "remix" them into sweet love letters on heart-shaped paper. What more could one ask for on Valentine's Day?

Geronimo has a date planned with Petunia Pretty Paws for Valentine's Day. But his friend Hercule Poirat calls and asks for Geronimo's help in solving a "Cheesecake Mystery." Will Petunia Pretty Paws be Geronimo's Valentine or will his Valentine plans be thwarted by a missing art expert? This book includes information about art restoration, some sinfully delicious cheesecake recipes and a fun game idea.

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