Beyond Coming Out: 6 Books About LGBTQ Kids and Tweens

I love a good coming out story, but it’s exciting to read queer and trans stories that aren’t just about coming out! Books and comics are also beginning to feature characters with identities from all across the spectrum - not just gay, but bisexual, demisexual, nonbinary and more! Explore more of the rainbow with these unconventional queer stories.

Hawke and Grayce escape a political coup by hiding among the Communion of Blue, women who wield beautiful textile magic. The Deep & Dark Blue follows Hawke as he works to overthrow the usurpers, and Grayce as she finds a place where she can be her true self.

The Chancellor and the Citadel are all that’s left of the world. The Chancellor has great magical power, but Olive worries that their healing-focused magic is useless. The pair quickly learn that power alone cannot hold a society together.

Lora Xi just started middle school, but she still wants to be a kid. While holding the titular Séance Tea Party with her stuffed animals, she summons a real ghost - Alexa, her former “imaginary” friend and first crush. Can they stay friends as Lora grows and Alexa stays the same?

Figure skating is Ana’s whole life, but a new, princess-themed program pushes questions about gender identity to the surface. In Ana on the Edge, Ana finds understanding through her friendship with Hayden, a trans boy.

Technically, You Started It tracks a text message conversation between Haley and Martin as they discuss their struggles with friendships and identity. This story features a demisexual girl and a bisexual boy.

In Spin With Me, Essie develops a crush on Ollie, her nonbinary classmate, she grows anxious about identity and labels. Ollie, however, is growing weary of conversations about identity, and wants to build a life outside their advocacy work.

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