All the Feels: Books About Emotions for Kids

Recently in story time, we sang the classic song "If You're Happy and You Know It." I realized that whenever we sing that song, I join in before I even ask myself, "am I happy right now?" It might sound silly, but understanding complex feelings can be as challenging for grown-ups as it is for kids!

Just like grown-ups, kids can get frustrated, excited, nervous, jealous, worried, angry or embarrassed. But kids don’t always have the words to talk about how they are feeling. Every child handles feelings differently and learning to deal with them is an important part of growing up. 

Books can help! Reading together can help young children identify their emotions and express them in healthy ways. These are some of my favorite books to help talk about feelings.

Some days I feel silly, and some days I feel sad. Today I Feel Silly & Other Moods That Make My Day shows that moods are just something that happen each day. Whatever I'm feeling inside is okay!

What should you do when someone else is sad? In The Rabbit Listened, all the animals think they know just what to do to make Taylor feel better, but only the rabbit quietly listens to how he is feeling.

Sometimes it feels like a worry can take on a life of its own! When Ruby Finds A Worry, it grows and grows and stops her from doing the things that she loves. What happens when she meets a boy with a worry of his own?

In The Many Colors of Harpreet Singh, Harpreet Singh wears a different color for every mood he feels, from happy yellow to courageous red. But when Harpreet's family has to move, everything just feels gray. Can he find a way to make life bright again?  

If you like these stories, you'll love our feelings story time!

For even more books to help you talk about feelings with your child, check out our Emotions in Motion book list!

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