There and Back Again: Hobbit-Inspired Reads

Do you celebrate Hobbit Day? In 1937, JRR Tolkien published a story he made up for his kids, The Hobbit. If you've read it, you know it's the story of Bilbo the hobbit, Gandalf the wizard and a crew on a quest. On that quest, they find out a lot about themselves. There is also a dragon, which is a detail that has always stuck in my mind. So, if you're looking for a book to celebrate Hobbit Day on September 22, I think you have two choices - read about a quest or dragons.

Looking for a quest?

The Serpent's Secret starts in the very normal town of Parsippany, NJ, where Kiranmala thinks everything on her 12th birthday will go to plan. But when her parents disappear and a demon winds up in her kitchen, Kiranmala winds up on an epic quest filled with drooling demons, sarcastic kids and a bird sidekick.

Prince Alto is determined to have an adventure in The Legend of Brightblade. He wants to be a bard in this world where music powers the magic. So he runs away from the castle and finds a group of friends (and maybe more of an adventure than he bargained for) in this graphic novel.

Step into a world where the continents are all in different time periods. In The Glass Sentence, Sophia becomes an explorer like the rest of her family in order to find her uncle Shadrack. Explore this incredible world with her and Theo!

Looking for a dragon?

In The Lost Ryū, Kohei and his family live with ryū, small dragons. The big ones are gone. But Kohei remembers the big ones, even though he's too young. What if he could go on a quest to find one? With the help of his neighbor, he just might!

Jax is sent to stay with Ma while his mother fights their eviction notice. Ma turns out to have three dragons in a bag. They can't stay in Brooklyn--there's not enough magic! Follow Jax and Ma in Dragons in A Bag try to find the parallel realm - but it's not as easy as just pressing a button.

Want to know where the dragons and magic started? John Ronald's Dragons follows JRR through childhood, as he makes up secret languages and dreams of fantasy worlds.

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