Charles A. Davis Papers

Dates: 1946-2009
Size: 16 linear feet, 30 archival boxes (1 flat)
Repository: Chicago Public Library, Woodson Regional Library, Vivian G. Harsh Research Collection of Afro-American History and Literature, 9525 S. Halsted Street, Chicago, Illinois 60628
Collection Number: 2003/09
Provenance: Deed of gift from Charles A. Davis, July 10, 2003
Access: No restrictions
Citation: When quoting material from this collection the preferred citation is: Charles A. Davis Papers, [Box #, Folder #], Chicago Public Library, Woodson Regional Library, Vivian G. Harsh Research Collection of Afro-American History and Literature
Processed by: Jeanie Child, Harsh Archival Project Processor, under supervision by Michael Flug, Senior Archivist, Harsh Archival Processing Project

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE

Charles A. Davis (1922- )

Over a span of sixty years Charles A. Davis has been a journalist, public relations consultant, business entrepreneur, and civic volunteer who strove to improve equal access to employment, education, housing, and health for African Americans in Chicago.

Born in 1922 Mobile, Alabama to Robert A. Davis and Clara Williams Davis, Charles and his two brothers and two sisters (a third brother deceased) soon moved to Chattanooga, Tennessee where his father served as the Atlanta Life Insurance agent. Sadly, both parents soon succumbed to tuberculosis and in 1931 the orphaned children (Robert, Clarice, Marguerite, and Charles) were transferred to Chicago in the care of maternal grandfather Charles Williams. Brought up with his brothers and sisters by their grandfather and several caring aunts, Charles attended high school at Wendell Phillips, later named DuSable High School until his 1939 graduation. A job opportunity as bellhop at Bronzeville’s Grand Hotel that year brought Davis into contact with many notable African Americans such as the NAACP’s Walter White, Roy Wilkins, W.E.B. DuBois, and Dr. Metz Lochard of the Chicago Defender. Just a few years at the hotel earned Davis a promotion to the front desk. However, he soon decided to try his hand at riding the rails as a Pullman porter, spending a short stint on the Milwaukee Road line before he was drafted into the U.S. Army in 1943. He served as technical sergeant in the Pacific (Philippines) before his 1946 discharge. Despite qualifying for officer candidate school Davis was denied a recommendation because of his race. He was removed from his clerical job training and reassigned to the laundry instead.

In 1934 Davis had joined the Church of the Good Shepherd (United Church of Christ) and found congenial yet intellectually stimulating activities for young people. Here he met his future wife Rosalie Dorsey, to whom he was married by the Rev. Harold M. Kingsley in 1943. Charles and Rosalie Davis had two children, Charles A. Jr. and Daphne Kaye. The family remained in Chicago, eventually settling in the north Beverly neighborhood. Davis’ sister Clarice married journalist, radio and television playwright Richard Durham, and remained a lifelong Chicago activist. His sister Marguerite also remained in Chicago. His brother Robert, also known as Davis Roberts, became a successful film actor despite the racial and political discrimination he encountered in Hollywood.

While in the Army, Davis corresponded with Dr. Metz Lochard at the Chicago Defender. In 1946, with army discharge in hand, he, accepted an invitation to join the Chicago Defender as a reporter. He was soon assigned a weekly sports column, later assuming positions as managing editor, city editor, publicity director, and advertising director. Defender colleagues included Richard Durham, Vernon Jarrett, David Kellum and Lucius Harper. During this time Davis continued his quest for higher education begun earlier at Chicago’s Central YMCA College and West Virginia State College, by studying political science at Chicago’s Roosevelt University from 1953 to 1955. It was also during this time that he began to direct his close attention to the growing civil rights movement.

In 1959 Charles Davis left the Chicago Defender to establish his own company, Charles A. Davis Associates, Inc. (C.A.D.A.). Davis created C.A.D.A. to fill a need for public relations services that he saw existed for minority clients and businesses. These services included publicity and advertising, research and marketing, conventions management, and other means of strengthening small businesses as well as entire industries. C.A.D.A. clients ranged from business owners, such as Baldwin Ice Cream, or nonprofit organizations like the Chicago Urban League, to corporations as large as United Air Lines. Not only did Davis assemble an experienced staff to handle diverse tasks, but he personally gained some renown as speechwriter for public figures such as Chicago Urban League president James Compton. Davis was accredited by the Public Relations Society of America in 1971.

As the civil rights movement entered the 1960s, diverse groups of Chicago activists struggled to overcome disunity while confronting public school segregation. With Chicago Urban League president Edwin C. “Bill” Berry and several others, Charles Davis as “convener” helped organize the various activist groups into the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations (CCCO). After carrying out several marches, sit-ins, and street demonstrations the CCCO lost cohesion amid accusations that certain members including Davis himself were secretly colluding with school officials and the mayor. However, after working with Dr. Martin Luther King during King’s Chicago visits Davis decided he could accomplish more by fundraising and promoting the minority business community. He resigned from the leadership of CCCO shortly thereafter but remained active as secretary of the NAACP.

Drawing on his family’s long affiliation with the historically African American life insurance industry, Charles Davis accepted the position of executive director at the National Insurance Association (NIA), in 1962. For more than twenty years Davis provided this trade association with his expertise in public relations, marketing, convention planning, and research services—a significant service during a period when the industry was losing its African American policyholders to larger white-controlled insurance companies.

Davis himself demonstrated entrepreneurship by launching the Jayson Building Corporation, the Phoenix Real Estate Group (a commercial development in Englewood), and the Adco Association (a shopping center at 87th Street and the Dan Ryan Expressway). His firm received city of Chicago certification as a minority employer. He joined the boards of several community banks, including the Morgan Park Savings and Loan Association. In 1970 Davis worked with several colleagues, including George Brokemond, to organize a new bank in the Gresham neighborhood that would serve a community abandoned by white residents and their banking institutions. After more than a decade the Highland Community Bank had grown into one of the Chicago region’s largest minority-owned banks. Davis remained on its board of directors for over three decades. Charles Davis and Associates, Inc. also provided public relations services including advertising across multiple media, research and marketing.

During the 1970s and 1980s Davis deliberately sought membership on many civic and nonprofit boards, partly in order to promote more capital investment in minority commercial enterprises such as his own. He served for decades on boards of organizations such as the NAACP Southside Chicago Branch, the Chicago Urban League, the Chicago Renewal Society, and several local foundations. Through these board networks, and through his appointments to local public commissions such as the Chicago Commission on Human Relations, the Chicago Economic Development Corp. (CEDCO), and the Cook County Comprehensive Health and Hospitals and Allied Medical Services Governing Commission, Davis built relationships with corporate CEOs, bankers, and high-ranking politicians whose support for minority enterprises and nonprofits he cultivated. In the early 1970s he worked with Chicago Urban League president James Compton to form a metropolitan organization of these colleagues, Chicago United, with a mission to leverage equal opportunity in employment, education, housing, and health care. Davis lobbied at the city, county, and state level on these causes.

In 1983 Charles Davis again responded to a pivotal civil rights issue, this time by supporting Harold Washington’s mayoral campaign. Davis participated in Washington’s mayoral initiatives, including Communications Task Force, and he also served in several economic development organizations such as the Chicago Economic Development Commission (CEDCO). After Washington’s death in 1987, local political backlash coupled with economic stagnation in the African American community presented Davis and his colleagues with fresh challenges as they attempted to maintain momentum in traditional organizations such as the Chicago Urban League and NAACP. On a lighter note Davis developed the Chicago Africa Study Tour Group, leading tours to countries related to the African diaspora and enjoying the research and organizing involved. He also enjoyed social meetings and service activities carried out by the exclusive Frogs and Druids Clubs. The 1990s found Davis still providing leadership through several directorships, including the Highland Community Bank.

Charles Davis received an honorary Doctor of Humane Services degree from Governor’s State University in 1975, its first granted. He was a Frontiers International “Chicagoan of the Year” in 1991. In 1981 the Chicago Insurance Association awarded him its Olive H. Crosthwaite Award. A citation for his contributions to minority business was presented to him by the Chicago Commission on Human Relations in 1974. The Chicago Economic Development Corporation awarded him the Gold Oil Can Award in 1971.

Sources

SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE

Materials in the Charles A. Davis Papers were created primarily during the 1970s through the 1990s by Charles Davis himself and his public relations firm, Charles A. Davis, Inc., as he pursued his work as public relations consultant, business entrepreneur, civil rights movement fundraiser, and journalist.

The Charles Davis Papers document a subject area poorly represented in archival repositories: business entrepreneurship in the African American community. Charles Davis helped to establish a number of real estate, banking, and small business investment companies that succeeded in racially segregated 20th century Chicago. While by no means a complete record of these activities, the Davis Papers reveal many of the human players, local conditions, and successful business practices involved. They also demonstrate how Davis and his colleagues in the African American community used their social and business networks to generate very successful fundraising and political campaigns that tapped both whites and African Americans of wealth—and that arguably influenced the progress of the civil rights struggle. Dozens of the era’s major players appear in these records, often in multiple contexts.

Just a few of Davis’ correspondents would include: Edwin C. “Bill” Berry, Alvin Boutte Sr., Corneal Davis, Garland Guice, Carey B. Preston, Earl B. Dickerson, Dr. Joseph H. Jackson, Theodore Jones, James Kemp, Charles F. “Chuck” Moore, James A. Pate, Consuelo Pope, and Jolyn H. Robichaux.

The Davis Papers consist almost entirely of correspondence, as well as a number of attached items related to particular organizations and business entities. These other materials include speech and literary drafts; resumes; press releases and other PR copy; news clippings; fundraising event items such as invitations, benefit tickets, and event programs; meeting agendas and minutes; financial reports; board of directors business; and photographs. Mostly absent from these records are materials created during Davis’ years at the Chicago Defender (1946-1959) and the early years of Charles A. Davis, Inc. and other Davis business concerns (1959-1970). Also not included are Davis’ personal documents such as birth, education, military, marriage, and religious records, and significant family correspondence, memorabilia and photographs.

Series 1: Biographical, 1963-1997

The many autobiographical sketches and resumes prepared by Davis himself over time reflect the complexity of his relationships to his clients, his business enterprises, and his nonprofit organizations, in which he simultaneously filled the roles of publicist, entrepreneur investor, and fund-raiser. Also reflected is the long-term nature of Davis’ commitments to the civil rights organizations to which he belonged and the minority businesses he fostered. The series consists mostly of Charles Davis’ own comprehensive and detailed autobiographical sketches and resumes created from 1966 to 2002, arranged chronologically. There is brief material about Davis’ children, and his brother Robert Davis, as well as Davis’ summary about his genealogical research into his slave ancestors. The researcher will find a bit more information about Davis’ family in Series 4, scattered in Subseries A (general correspondence).

Series 2: Manuscripts, 1942-2006

This series shows the breadth of Charles Davis’ authorship as journalist, publicist, autobiographer, and fiction writer. Included are books, shorter works, speeches, and newspaper columns, mostly in draft form. Listed first are Davis’ one published book, On My Own (1971), an autobiographical work intended for junior high school readers, and his unpublished manuscript, “A Cleansing Flame: A Tale from the Civil War,” about an African American and his white counterpart during the Civil War. On My Own provides a wealth of biographical material about Davis’ earlier years (before 1970) not documented elsewhere in this collection. The few short essays, narrative pieces, and other nonfiction works are arranged alphabetically by title or description. These include travelogues created during Davis’ Study Tour Group trips to China and South Africa. Following are speeches Davis either wrote for himself or did not designate otherwise, also listed alphabetically by title or description. The researcher should note that the bulk of the speeches written by Charles Davis may be found with the particular client’s or organization’s correspondence, i.e., speeches prepared for James Compton are filed with the Chicago Urban League material, speeches written for Alvin J. Boutte are found in National Insurance Association files, both in Series 4 (Correspondence), Subseries C (Organizations).

The drafts, finished copy, and news clippings for Davis’ “My View” column written for the Chicago Defender (1983-1987) are arranged chronologically except for column clippings for which drafts were not found, placed at the end. “My View” covered a number of topics relevant both to Davis’ own cherished views and also to contemporary events. The researcher will find that dating on the drafts does not always match dating on the published columns.

Series 3: Charles A. Davis Associates, Inc. (C.A.D.A.), 1965-1990s

Much of the correspondence in the Davis Papers carries the letterhead of Davis’ public relations firm Charles A. Davis Associates, Inc. (C.A.D.A.). However, the small amount of material gathered here into Series 3 represents C.A.D.A.’s internal structure and functions but appears to be far from complete, especially for the years 1959-1970. Included are organizational documents and public relations material of a general nature. Correspondence between Charles Davis and his employees is available where it does not violate privacy concerns. This material helps illustrate how Davis managed C.A.D.A. and how he worked with a variety of employees--from independent professionals, many of whom were active in Chicago’s political, cultural, and economic spheres, to office managers, to typists. However, the researcher should see Series 4 (Correspondence, Subseries A-D) for evidence of the professional work done by particular employees. This series is arranged alphabetically by topic or description, except for the large array of mailing lists which are placed at the end of the series, also in alphabetical order by list title. The mailing lists provide specific names of business concerns, organizations, prominent persons, and other categories of mail recipients active at various times over a thirty-year period, thus revealing Chicago’s contemporary social, political, and economic landscape to the researcher in a concise way.

Series 4: Correspondence, 1962-2001

Subseries A, B, C, D

To provide clarity to the arrangement of this large volume of material, Series 4 Correspondence has been divided into four subseries: general correspondence, individual clients, organizations, and quasi-governmental. The researcher must keep in mind that material about a specific subject (e.g. NAACP) will most likely be found both in the relevant subseries (e.g., organizations) as well as in Subseries A (general correspondence). Subseries A (general correspondence) is arranged chronologically. Subseries B (individual clients), Subseries C (organizations), and Subseries D (quasi-governmental) instead are arranged alphabetically by folder name, and mostly chronologically within folders.

Material in the entire correspondence series provides a wealth of information about the individual citizens, organizations, and governmental entities involved in Charles Davis’ work. The papers also indicate in what ways Davis may have influenced their functioning, the methods he employed, and the wide range of his management skills. This series also provides a nuanced picture of how the African American community in Chicago effected changes and was in turn forced to contend with reactions from the larger community. The researcher may see, for example, how quickly the African American community rallied after the election of Mayor Harold Washington (1983-1987) to advance measures long needed to realize equality of opportunity. Likewise, ways the community dealt with both the economic stresses of the 1980s and the aftermath of Washington’s death are reflected in the contemporary correspondence. The researcher should note three folders of material representing Davis’ 23 years as executive director of the National Insurance Association (NIA. Those records include NIA public relations brochures and handouts; a few details that illustrate the contemporary condition of the organization, such as Davis’ use of Chicago Urban League employment offices to recruit NIA employees; and speeches written by Charles Davis for NIA speaker Alvin J. Boutte. Unfortunately, the bulk of contemporary NIA records are not included in this collection, and their present location is unknown.

Series 4 (Subseries A-D) comprises Davis’ correspondence with his clients, his colleagues in the organizations and businesses he worked with, or persons he wished to include in that circle. This material is almost entirely comprised of Davis’ outgoing correspondence, usually without the referenced incoming correspondence. Occasional correspondence to family members is mostly of a business or financial nature. All correspondence subseries, but particularly B,C, and D, include other material such as speeches, press releases, brochures, invitations, news clippings, political campaign material, financial reports, marketing proposals, meeting minutes, board membership lists, and annual reports. However, a number of photographs referenced as enclosures in the correspondence were not found in this collection.

The original order of the correspondence in the Davis Papers suggests that while separate files were created for some C.A.D.A. clients in earlier years (1970 or earlier), over time most correspondence was filed all together, chronologically. Therefore Series 4 has been arranged to include both those relatively few original client files as well as the later very general correspondence files. For a thorough search, the researcher should examine not only specific individual, organization, or quasi-governmental correspondence (Subseries B, C, and D) but also the general correspondence (Subseries A) in relevant dates.

Series 5: Highland Community Bank (HCB), 1968-2000

Series 5, while providing a broad range of material and information about Highland Community Bank, is limited to those documents created or received by Charles Davis. The series illustrates some of the challenges met by Davis and the other Highland Community Bank directors in their ongoing struggles to maintain adequate capitalization of Highland. Information about the bank’s board of directors provides insight into key individuals and subgroupings within the African American community. Also illuminated is Charles Davis’ relationship to bank president George Brokemond and the board of directors, as well as some information about the small number of other minority-owned banks in the Chicago region. Materials in this series are arranged by topic groupings, including board of directors, financial material, personnel, correspondence, and public relations, and then chronologically within folders. A large number of HCB photographs may be found in Series 9.

Series 6: Obituaries and Funeral Programs, 1979-2000

One of many services provided by Charles A. Davis Associates, Inc. was the preparation and publication of obituary press releases. When possible these materials were removed from the general correspondence, notated as to the presence of obituary or funeral program, placed in this series, and arranged alphabetically by the deceased’s last name.

Series 7: Subject Research Files, 1970-1992

Series 7 includes informational material, such as published reports, not directly related to other series. Of interest is the policy study, “Economic Impact of the Negro Traveler,” (circa 1970). Items are arranged alphabetically by title or description, chronologically within folders.

Series 8: Oral History (Audio), 2009

The three sound recordings in this series were created under the auspices of StoryCorps, an American non-profit organization whose mission is to record, preserve, and share the stories of Americans from all backgrounds and beliefs. These recordings were made to document the life of Chester Commodore, pioneering African American cartoonist who for many years created political cartoons featured in the Chicago Defender newspaper. The recordings, on audiocassette tapes, contain an interview of Charles A. Davis, and also an interview of Earl Calloway, a Davis colleague who worked with him at The Chicago Defender. These interviews produced a wealth of detail about Davis’ work and colleagues at the Chicago Defender. The interviews were conducted in 2009 by Michael Flug and Lorin Nails-Smoote (Chester Commodore’s daughter). Recording took place at the Chicago Public Library’s Woodson Regional Library, Vivian G. Harsh Research Collection of Afro-American History and Literature, Chicago.

Series 9: Photographs, 1946-2002

Series 9 provides nearly a hundred photographs, mostly related to the work of Davis’ public relations firm, Charles A. Davis Associates, Inc. during the 1970s and 1980s. Of particular interest is the first photograph in the series, a group shot showing Davis as a new Chicago Defender reporter working at a 1946 press conference held by former U.S. vice-president and cabinet member Henry Wallace. About ten percent of the photos are portraits of Davis taken over time and used in the promotion of his firm’s services. Another third of the photos, also featuring Davis, show him with his colleagues during events sponsored by the various organizations he worked for or belonged to, including the National Insurance Association (NIA), the Black Public Relations Society, and the Highland Community Bank. Davis’ wife Rosalie and sister Clarice appear in a few of these. Photos that feature some of Davis’ nonprofit and business colleagues, both individually and in group situations, comprise yet another quarter of the photos. The remaining photographs were produced to provide copy for Highland Community Bank publications and feature the bank’s directors (including Davis), employees, customers, and physical plant primarily in the 1970s. The photographs in this series are grouped and arranged in the order described above. Many photographs in this series provided no attached identification.

Series 10: Memorabilia, circa 1977-1978

This “Nothing Says Love Like Insurance” button was part of an industry-wide effort to retain the support of the African American life insurance market, circa 1977 or 1978.

Related materials at the Chicago Public Library include:

Related materials at other repositories include:

CONTAINER LIST

SERIES 1: BIOGRAPHICAL, 1963-1997

Box 1 Folder 1 Charles Davis biographical information and sketches, 1966-1997
Box 1 Folder 2 Charles Davis resumes, circa 1970-2002
Box 1 Folder 3 Charles Davis award certificate, Governor’s Task Force on Private Sector Initiatives, 1984
Box 1 Folder 4 Charles Davis award certificate, National Society of Literature and the Arts, undated
Box 1 Folder 5 Charles Davis clippings, 1954-1963
Box 1 Folder 6 Charles Davis clippings, 1964-1969
Box 1 Folder 7 Charles Davis clippings, 1970-1983
Box 1 Folder 8 Charles Davis election handbill for Chicago Economic Development Corp., circa 1980
Books, Folder 9 Charles Davis event program, “African Americans in World War II” film premiere, 1997
Box 1 Folder 10 Charles Davis event program, “Chicagoan of the Year Charles A. Davis,” 1991
Box 1 Folder 11 Charles Davis event program, “17th Ward Citizen’s Committee Tribute to Alderman William H. Shannon,” 1973
Box 1 Folder 12 Family, Charles Davis’ children, 1975
Box 1 Folder 13 Family, Davis genealogy, 1993
Box 1 Folder 14 Marilyn Hansberry Davis, 1979
Box 1 Folder 15 Family, Robert A. Davis (also known as Davis Roberts) obituary, July 18,1993

SERIES 2: MANUSCRIPTS by Charles Davis, 1946-2006

Box 1 Folder 16 On My Own, by Charles Davis, with R.E. Simon, Jr., Children’s Press, Chicago, 1970 (photocopy only)
Box 1 Folder 17 A Cleansing Flame: A Tale from the Civil War, by Charles Davis, 2006 (draft only)
Box 1 Folder 18 “Biography of James Harry Lucien III,” circa 1980
Box 1 Folder 19 “Briefly, South Africa: Journal of a Tour,” 1995
Box 1 Folder 20 “A Five Minute Overview of 50 Centuries of Civilization,” 1990
Box 1 Folder 21 “An Octogenarian You Should Know,” undated
Box 1 Folder 22 [On returning to writing for a general audience] memo to Tom Picou, circa 1983
Box 1 Folder 23 “21 Days in China: Notes by Charles A. Davis,” [1994]
Box 1 Folder 24 [Untitled: The Nature of Racism], undated
Box 1 Folder 25 “Welcome in N’Daimo-lo,” 1990
Box 1 Folder 26 [Untitled, about Chicago Public Schools] speech to Harvard Club [1989]
Box 1 Folder 27 “Biographical Notes for Introduction [of] Ernest T. Collins,” speech, 1979
Box 2 Folder 1 “Discussion draft #1 . . . total expurgation of racially instigated disadvantage,” speech [1981]
Box 21 Folder 2 “Professionalism and Ethics: Their Place in Modern Society,” speech to Odontographic Society of Chicago, 1986
Box 2 Folder 3 [Remarks to] Illinois Conference on College Relations Staffers, 1973
Box 2 Folder 4 “Remarks to Prime Movers’ Luncheon,” 1991
Box 2 Folder 5 “To the Classes of New Phillips/DuSable High School, 1935-1939,” speech, 1984
Box 2 Folder 6 “Tribute to Tom Ayers,” speech, circa 1980
Box 2 Folder 7 “What Newspapers Can Do to Help World Unity,” speech for J.H.S. [John H. Sengstacke], 1985
Box 2 Folder 8 Draft notes for untitled speeches, undated
Box 2 Folder 9 “Wallace Speaks for Peace,” article, Chicago Defender, 1946
Box 2 Folder 10 “10 Negro Members Present As State Assembly Opens,” article, Chicago Defender, 1957
Box 2 Folder 11 “Confetti” guest column, Chicago Defender, 1963
Box 2 Folder 12 “My View” columns, Chicago Defender, 1983
Box 2 Folder 13 “My View” columns, Chicago Defender, 1984
Box 2 Folder 14 “My View” columns, Chicago Defender, 1985
Box 2 Folder 15 “My View” columns, Chicago Defender, 1986
Box 2 Folder 16 “My View” columns, Chicago Defender, 1987
Box 2 Folder 17 “My View” columns, Chicago Defender [undated]
Box 2 Folder 18 “My View” columns, Chicago Defender clippings, no drafts, 1983-1985
Box 2 Folder 19 [untitled] 2 articles about Harold Washington campaign for mayor, Chicago Defender, 1983

SERIES 3: CHARLES A. DAVIS ASSOCIATES, INC. [C.A.D.A.], 1965-1990s

Box 3 Folder 1 C.A.D.A. brochure, circa 1984
Box 3 Folder 2 C.A.D.A. company descriptions, 1970-1984, undated
Box 3 Folder 3 C.A.D.A. Dun & Bradstreet Inc. rating, 1982
Box 3 Folder 4 C.A.D.A. employee form booklet [1970s-1980s]
Box 3 Folder 5 C.A.D.A. lease, Chicago Daily Defender, 1989
Box 3 Folder 6 C.A.D.A. public relations script for slide show, 1978
Box 3 Folder 7 C.A.D.A. sample invitations, programs, 1970s-1990s
Box 3 Folder 8 C.A.D.A. [selected client profiles] 1981
Box 3 Folder 9 C.A.D.A. staff and employee correspondence, 1965-1985
Box 3 Folder 10 C.A.D.A. State of Illinois annual corporate reports, 1983, 1985
Box 3 Folder 11 C.A.D.A. mailing list [Robert S. Abbott Memorial Award, 1983-1987]
Box 3 Folder 12 C.A.D.A. mailing list, Chicago Caucus, 1972
Box 3 Folder 13 C.A.D.A. mailing list, by organization type, undated
Box 3 Folder 14 C.A.DA. mailing list, Greek fraternity and sorority, undated
Box 3 Folder 15 C.A.D.A. mailing lists, published material, 1980-1989
Box 3 Folder 16 C.A.D.A. mailing lists, various organizations, 1982-1984
Box 3 Folder 17 C.A.D.A. mailing lists, various organizations, 1985-1994, undated
Box 3 Folder 18 C.A.D.A. mailing lists, undated [1970s-1990s]

SERIES 4: CORRESPONDENCE

Sub-series A, General Correspondence, 1970-2000

Box 4 Folder 1 General correspondence, 1970-1974
Box 4 Folder 2 General correspondence, 1975-1977
Box 4 Folder 3 General correspondence, 1978 January-June
Box 4 Folder 4 General correspondence, 1978 July-August
Box 4 Folder 5 General correspondence, 1978 September
Box 4 Folder 6 General correspondence, 1978 October
Box 4 Folder 7 General correspondence, 1978 November
Box 4 Folder 8 General correspondence, 1978 December
Box 4 Folder 9 General correspondence, 1979 January-February
Box 4 Folder 10 General correspondence, 1979 March-April
Box 4 Folder 11 General correspondence, 1979 May-June
Box 4 Folder 12 General correspondence, 1979 July-August
Box 4 Folder 13 General correspondence, 1979 September-October
Box 4 Folder 14 General correspondence, 1979 November-December
Box 4 Folder 15 General correspondence, 1980 January-February
Box 4 Folder 16 General correspondence, 1980 March-April
Box 4 Folder 17 General correspondence, 1980 May-June
Box 4 Folder18 General correspondence, 1980 July –August
Box 4 Folder 19 General correspondence, 1980 September-October
Box 4 Folder 20 General correspondence, 1980 November-December, undated
Box 4 Folder 21 General correspondence, 1981 January-February
Box 4 Folder 22 General correspondence, 1981 March-April
Box 4 Folder 23 General correspondence, 1981 May-June
Box 5 Folder 1 General correspondence, 1981 July
Box 5 Folder 2 General correspondence, 1981 August-September
Box 5 Folder 3 General correspondence, 1981 October-November
Box 5 Folder 4 General correspondence, 1981 December
Box 5 Folder 5 General correspondence, 1982 January-February
Box 5 Folder 6 General correspondence, 1982 March-April
Box 5 Folder 7 General correspondence, 1982 May-June
Box 5 Folder 8 General correspondence, 1982 July-August
Box 5 Folder 9 General correspondence, 1982 September-October
Box 5 Folder 10 General correspondence, 1982 November-December
Box 5 Folder 11 General correspondence, 1983 January
Box 5 Folder 12 General correspondence, 1983 February
Box 5 Folder 13 General correspondence, 1983 March-April
Box 5 Folder 14 General correspondence, 1983 May
Box 5 Folder 15 General correspondence, 1983 June-August
Box 5 Folder 16 General correspondence, 1983 September-October
Box 5 Folder 17 General correspondence, 1983 November-December
Box 6 Folder 1 General correspondence, 1984 January-February
Box 6 Folder 2 General correspondence, 1984 March-June
Box 6 Folder 3 General correspondence, 1984 July-September
Box 6 Folder 4 General correspondence, 1984 October-December
Box 6 Folder 5 General correspondence, 1985 January-February
Box 6 Folder 6 General correspondence, 1985 March-April
Box 6 Folder 7 General correspondence, 1985 May-June
Box 6 Folder 8 General correspondence, 1985 July-September
Box 6 Folder 9 General correspondence, 1985 October-December
Box 6 Folder 10 General correspondence, 1986 January-March
Box 6 Folder 11 General correspondence, 1986 April-July
Box 6 Folder 12 General correspondence, 1986 August-October
Box 6 Folder 13 General correspondence, 1986 November-December
Box 6 Folder 14 General correspondence, 1987 January-April
Box 6 Folder 15 General correspondence, 1987 May-August
Box 7 Folder 1 General correspondence, 1987 September-December
Box 7 Folder 2 General correspondence, 1988 January-May
Box 7 Folder 3 General correspondence, 1988 June-September
Box 7 Folder 4 General correspondence, 1988 October-December
Box 7 Folder 5 General correspondence, 1989 January-March
Box 7 Folder 6 General correspondence, 1989 April-May
Box 7 Folder 7 General correspondence, 1989 June-September
Box 7 Folder 8 General correspondence, 1989 October-December
Box 7 Folder 9 General correspondence, 1990 January-March
Box 7 Folder 10 General correspondence, 1990 April-June
Box 7 Folder 11 General correspondence, 1990 July-September
Box 7 Folder 12 General correspondence, 1990 October-December
Box 7 Folder 13 General correspondence, 1991 January-February
Box 7 Folder 14 General correspondence, 1991 March-April
Box 7 Folder 15 General correspondence, 1991 May-June
Box 8 Folder 1 General correspondence, 1991 July-August
Box 8 Folder 2 General correspondence, 1991 September-October
Box 8 Folder 3 General correspondence, 1991 November-December
Box 8 Folder 4 General correspondence, 1992 January-April
Box 8 Folder 5 General correspondence, 1992 May-August
Box 8 Folder 6 General correspondence, 1992 September-December
Box 8 Folder 7 General correspondence, 1993 January-March
Box 8 Folder 8 General correspondence, 1993 April-May
Box 8 Folder 9 General correspondence, 1993 June-July
Box 8 Folder 10 General correspondence, 1993 August-October
Box 8 Folder 11 General correspondence, 1993 November-December
Box 8 Folder 12 General correspondence, 1994 January-February
Box 8 Folder 13 General correspondence, 1994-March-April
Box 8 Folder 14 General correspondence, 1994 May-August
Box 8 Folder 15 General correspondence, 1994 September-December
Box 8 Folder 16 General correspondence, 1995 January-March
Box 9 Folder 1 General correspondence, 1995 April-May
Box 9 Folder 2 General correspondence, 1995 June-July
Box 9 Folder 3 General correspondence, 1995 August-December
Box 9 Folder 4 General correspondence, 1996 January-June
Box 9 Folder 5 General correspondence, 1996 July-December
Box 9 Folder 6 General correspondence, 1997 January-March
Box 9 Folder 7 General correspondence, 1997 April-June
Box 9 Folder 8 General correspondence, 1997 July-September
Box 9 Folder 9 General correspondence, 1997 October-December
Box 9 Folder 10 General correspondence, 1998 January-April
Box 9 Folder 11 General correspondence,1998 May-August
Box 9 Folder 12 General correspondence, 1998 September
Box 9 Folder 13 General correspondence, 1998 October-December
Box 9 Folder 14 General correspondence, 1999 January-May
Box 10 Folder 1 General correspondence, 1999 June-August
Box 10 Folder 2 General correspondence, 1999 September-December
Box 10 Folder 3 General correspondence, 2000 January-December

SERIES 4: CORRESPONDENCE

Sub-series B, Individual Clients, 1972-1990

Box 10 Folder 4 Jackson, Rev. J. (Joseph) H., and National Baptist Convention U.S.A., 1976-1978
Box 10 Folder 5 Johnson, (Hon.) Eddie C., judicial candidate retention election campaign, 1984
Box 10 Folder 6 Johnson, (Hon.) Eddie C., judicial municipal election fundraiser, 1984
Box 10 Folder 7 Johnson, (Hon.) Eddie C., judicial municipal election publicity, 1984
Box 10 Folder 8 Johnson, (Hon.) Eddie C., judicial municipal election campaign, 1990
Box 10 Folder 9 Johnson, George E., speeches, 1972-1979
Box 10 Folder 10 Jones, George, T.R. Auto Handling Corporation, 1978
Box 10 Folder 11 Jones, Theodore A., William S. Anderson Controller Computer Services, undated
Box 10 Folder 12 Lawson, Louise, Illinois Service Federal Savings and Loan, undated
Box 10 Folder 13 Lowery, Winifred, 1978-1985
Box 10 Folder 14 Partee, Cecil A., 1980-1989

SERIES 4: CORRESPONDENCE

Sub-series C, Organizations, 1962-2001

Box 11 Folder 1 Baldwin Ice Cream Company, Mrs. Jolyn Robichaux, 1975-1989
Box 11 Folder 2 Chicago Africa Study Tour Group, 1985-1987
Box 11 Folder 3 Chicago Africa Study Tour Group, 1988
Box 11 Folder 4 Chicago Africa Study Tour Group, 1989
Box 11 Folder 5 Chicago Africa Study Tour Group, 1990
Box 11 Folder 6 Chicago Africa Study Tour Group, 1991
Box 11 Folder 7 Chicago Africa Study Tour Group, 1992
Box 11 Folder 8 Chicago Africa Study Tour Group, 1993
Box 11 Folder 9 Chicago Africa Study Tour Group, 1994
Box 11 Folder 10 Chicago Africa Study Tour Group, 1995
Box 12 Folder 1 Chicago Africa Study Tour Group, 1996-1997
Box 12 Folder 2 Chicago Africa Study Tour Group, 1998
Box 12 Folder 3 Chicago Africa Study Tour Group, 1999
Box 12 Folder 4 Chicago Africa Study Tour Group, 2000-2001
Box 12 Folder 5 Chicago Association of Commerce and Industry, 1962-1980
Box 12 Folder 6 Chicago Black United Fund, 1976
Box 12 Folder 7 Chicago Forum, 1977-1979
Box 12 Folder 8 Chicago Metropolitan Council on Alcoholism, circa 1975-1976
Box 12 Folder 9 Chicago Passion Play Foundation (“The Passion Play”), 1979
Box 12 Folder 10 Chicago United, 1971-1977
Box 12 Folder 11 Chicago United, 1978
Box 13 Folder 1 Chicago United, 1979
Box 13 Folder 2 Chicago United, 1980 January-March
Box 13 Folder 3 Chicago United, 1980 April-June
Box 13 Folder 4 Chicago United, 1980 July-September
Box 13 Folder 5 Chicago United, 1980 October –December
Box 13 Folder 6 Chicago United, 1981 January-March
Box 13 Folder 7 Chicago United, 1981 April-July
Box 14 Folder 1 Chicago United, 1981 August-December
Box 14 Folder 2 Chicago United, 1982
Box 14 Folder 3 Chicago United, 1983
Box 14 Folder 4 Chicago United, 1984-1985
Box 14 Folder 5 Chicago United, 1986-1987
Box 14 Folder 6 Chicago United, 1988-1989
Box 14 Folder 7 Chicago United, 1990-1995
Box 14 Folder 8 Chicago Urban League, 1973-1974
Box 14 Folder 9 Chicago Urban League, 1975
Box 14 Folder 10 Chicago Urban League, 1976
Box 15 Folder 1 Chicago Urban League, 1977
Box 15 Folder 2 Chicago Urban League, 1978 January-August
Box 15 Folder 3 Chicago Urban League, 1978 September-December, undated
Box 15 Folder 4 Chicago Urban League, 1979
Box 15 Folder 5 Chicago Urban League, 1980
Box 15 Folder 6 Chicago Urban League, 1981
Box 15 Folder 7 Chicago Urban League, 1982
Box 16 Folder 1 Chicago Urban League, 1983
Box 16 Folder 2 Chicago Urban League, 1984
Box 16 Folder 3 Chicago Urban League, 1985
Box 16 Folder 4 Chicago Urban League, 1986
Box 16 Folder 5 Chicago Urban League, 1987
Box 16 Folder 6 Chicago Urban League, 1988
Box 16 Folder 7 Chicago Urban League, 1989
Box 16 Folder 8 Chicago Urban League, 1990
Box 16 Folder 9 Chicago Urban League, 1991
Box 17 Folder 1 Chicago Urban League, 1992
Box 17 Folder 2 Chicago Urban League, 1993
Box 17 Folder 3 Chicago Urban League, 1994
Box 17 Folder 4 Chicago Urban League, 1995
Box 17 Folder 5 Chicago Urban League, 1996
Box 17 Folder 6 Chicago Urban League, 1997
Box 17 Folder 7 Chicago Urban League, 1998
Box 17 Folder 8 Chicago Urban League, 1999
Box 17 Folder 9 Chicago Urban League, 2000
Box 17 Folder 10 Chicago Urban League, 2001
Box 18 Folder 1 Chicago Urban League Clippings, 1975-1989
Box 18 Folder 2 Chicago Urban League Publications, 1975
Box 18 Folder 3 Chicago Urban League Publications, 1976
Box 18 Folder 4 Chicago Urban League Publications, 1977
Box 18 Folder 5 Chicago Urban League Publications, 1978
Box 18 Folder 6 Chicago Urban League Publications, 1979
Box 18 Folder 7 Chicago Urban League Publications, 1980
Box 18 Folder 8 Chicago Urban League Publications, 1981
Box 18 Folder 9 Chicago Urban League Publications, 1982
Box 18 Folder 10 Chicago Urban League Publications, 1983
Box 19 Folder 1 Chicago Urban League Publications, 1984
Box 19 Folder 2 Chicago Urban League Publications, 1985-1987
Box 19 Folder 3 Chicago Urban League Publications, 1988-1989
Box 19 Folder 4 Chicago Urban League Publications, 1990-1997
Box 19 Folder 5 Chicago Urban League Publications, 2000-2001
Box 19 Folder 6 Chicago Urban League, National Urban League publications, 1977-1978
Box 19 Folder 7 Chicago Urban League, National Urban League publications, 1981-2000
Box 19 Folder 8 Chicago Urban League, keynote address by Vernon Jordan, National Urban League annual conference, 1978
Box 20 Folder 1 Cosmopolitan Chamber of Commerce, 1973-1989
Box 20 Folder 2 Cosmopolitan Chamber of Commerce, 1990-1998
Box 20 Folder 3 Druids Club, 1980-1999
Box 20 Folder 4 Economic Club of Chicago, 1980-2000
Box 20 Folder 5 Frogs Club, 1981-1989
Box 20 Folder 6 Frogs Club, 1990-1999
Box 20 Folder 7 Greek Leadership Conference, 1983
Box 20 Folder 8 Illinois State Chamber of Commerce, 1980
Box 20 Folder 9 International Association of Official Human Rights Agencies, 1984
Box 20 Folder 10 International Association of Official Human Rights Agencies, 1985
Box 21 Folder 1 Leadership Greater Chicago, circa 1986
Box 21 Folder 2 Minority Ownership and Cable Communications Symposium, circa 1993
Box 21 Folder 3 Morgan Park Savings and Loan Association, 1978-1980
Box 21 Folder 4 NAACP, Chicago Southside Branch, 1978-1989
Box 21 Folder 5 NAACP, Chicago Southside Branch, 1990-1993
Box 21 Folder 6 NAACP, Chicago Southside Branch, 1994-1995
Box 21 Folder 7 NAACP, Chicago Southside Branch, 1997-2000
Box 21 Folder 8 National Insurance Association (NIA), 1970-1979
Box 21 Folder 9 National Insurance Association (NIA), 1980-1989
Box 21 Folder 10 National Insurance Association (NIA), 1990-1994
Box 22 Folder 1 Odontographic Society of Chicago, 1986
Box 22 Folder 2 Quinn Chapel, Dr. Charles Spivey, 1978
Box 22 Folder 3 St. Bernard’s Hospital, 1984
Box 22 Folder 4 South Side Bank, 1981
Box 22 Folder 5 Umbrian Glee Club, 1995
Box 22 Folder 6 United Air Lines, Davis Proposal, 1985
Box 22 Folder 7 United Air Lines, 1985 May
Box 22 Folder 8 United Air Lines, 1985 June-December
Box 22 Folder 9 United Air Lines, 1986

SERIES 4: CORRESPONDENCE

Sub-series D, Quasi-governmental organizations, 1967-1988

Box 22 Folder 10 Chicago City Colleges, 1967-1980
Box 22 Folder 11 Chicago Commission on Human Relations, 1974
Box 23 Folder 1 Chicago Commission on Human Relations, 1984
Box 23 Folder 2 Chicago Economic Development Corporation, 1976-1982
Box 23 Folder 3 Chicago Economic Development Commission, 1983 January-October
Box 23 Folder 4 Chicago Economic Development Commission, 1983 November
Box 23 Folder 5 Chicago Economic Development Commission, 1983 December
Box 23 Folder 6 Chicago Economic Development Commission, 1984
Box 23 Folder 7 Chicago Economic Development Commission, 1984, undated (reports only)
Box 23 Folder 8 Chicago Economic Development Commission, 1985
Box 23 Folder 9 Chicago Minority Business Opportunity Committee, 1978-1979
Box 23 Folder 10 Illinois Board of Governors of State Colleges and Universities, 1967-1988
Box 23 Folder 11 Illinois Commerce Commission, 1980
Box 23 Folder 12 Illinois Commission on Human Relations, 1980

SERIES 5: HIGHLAND COMMUNITY BANK [HCB], 1968-2000

Box 24 Folder 1 HCB 1974 Annual Report
Box 24 Folder 2 HCB 1975 Annual Report
Box 24 Folder 3 HCB 1976 Annual Report
Box 24 Folder 4 HCB 1977 Annual Report
Box 24 Folder 5 HCB 1978 Annual Report
Box 24 Folder 6 HCB 1980 Annual Report
Box 24 Folder 7 HCB 1981 Annual Report
Box 24 Folder 8 HCB 1982 Annual Report
Box 24 Folder 9 HCB 1983 Annual Report
Box 24 Folder 10 HCB 1986 Annual Report
Box 24 Folder 11 HCB 1987 Annual Report
Box 24 Folder 12 HCB Board of Directors (Federal Reserve Bank Report) 1999-2000
Box 24 Folder 13 HCB By-laws, 1970
Box 24 Folder 14 Financial Reports, 1988
Box 24 Folder 15 Expanded Audit Committee (FDIC), 1982
Box 24 Folder 16 Profit-sharing and fees, 1968-1977
Box 24 Folder 17 Stock party, 1975
Box 24 Folder 18 HCB Organization Diagram, 1979
Box 24 Folder 19 HCB Personnel Committee, 1976
Box 24 Folder 20 George Brokemond , biography and PR, 1977-1979
Box 25 Folder 1 George Brokemond, speeches, 1975-1979
Box 25 Folder 2 Director and staff biographies [1970s-1980s]
Box 25 Folder 3 HGB correspondence, 1974-1976
Box 25 Folder 4 HGB correspondence, 1977 January-June
Box 25 Folder 5 HGB correspondence, 1977 July-December
Box 25 Folder 6 HGB correspondence, 1978 January-May
Box 25 Folder 7 HGB correspondence, 1978 June-December
Box 25 Folder 8 HGB correspondence, 1979
Box 25 Folder 9 HGB correspondence, 1980
Box 25 Folder 10 HGB correspondence, 1981 January-April
Box 25 Folder 11 HGB correspondence, 1981 May-December
Box 25 Folder 12 HGB correspondence, 1982 January-June
Box 25 Folder 13 HGB correspondence, 1982 July-December
Box 25 Folder 14 HGB correspondence, 1983
Box 25 Folder 15 HGB correspondence, 1984 January-June
Box 25 Folder 16 HGB correspondence, 1984 July-December
Box 25 Folder 17 HGB correspondence, 1985
Box 25 Folder 18 HGB correspondence, 1986
Box 25 Folder 19 HGB correspondence, 1987
Box 26 Folder 1 HGB correspondence, 1988
Box 26 Folder 2 HGB correspondence, 1989
Box 26 Folder 3 HGB correspondence, 1990
Box 26 Folder 4 HGB correspondence, 1991
Box 26 Folder 5 HGB correspondence, 1992
Box 26 Folder 6 HGB correspondence, 1993 January-April
Box 26 Folder 7 HGB correspondence, 1993 May-December
Box 26 Folder 8 HGB correspondence, 1994
Box 26 Folder 9 HGB correspondence, 1995
Box 26 Folder 10 HGB correspondence, 1996
Box 26 Folder 11 HGB correspondence, 1997 January-June
Box 26 Folder 12 HGB correspondence, 1997 July-December
Box 26 Folder 13 HGB correspondence, 1998
Box 26 Folder 14 HGB correspondence, 1999
Box 26 Folder 15 HGB correspondence, 2000
Box 26 Folder 16 PR, C.A.D.A. press releases, 1974-1978
Box 26 Folder 17 PR, draft article for Dollars & Sense, 1984
Box 26 Folder 18 PR, HCB Newsletter, 1981-1983
Box 27 Folder 1 PR, HCB publications, ads, promos, 1975 -1976
Box 27 Folder 2 PR, billboard advertising, 1975-1977
Box 27 Folder 3 PR, media advertising, 1975-1979
Box 27 Folder 4 PR, Marketing Plan and Agreement (Comark), 1971
Box 27 Folder 5 PR, Marketing Plan (Comark), 1972
Box 27 Folder 6 PR, promotional certificate, 1972
Box 27 Folder 7 PR, Fourth Anniversary promotion,1974

SERIES 6: OBITUARIES AND FUNERAL PROGRAMS, 1979-2000

Box 28 Folder 1 Graham, Carrie Clark, obituary, 1998
Box 28 Folder 2 Grant, Blaine Chester, obituary, 1987
Box 28 Folder 3 Grant, Hattie Goode, obituary [1998]
Box 28 Folder 4 Henderson, Celious, obituary, 1984
Box 28 Folder 5 Hopkins, Barbara C., obituary [1997]
Box 28 Folder 6 Johnson, John Edward, funeral and memorial programs, 1979
Box 28 Folder 7 Kemp, John H., Jr., funeral program, 1983
Box 28 Folder 8 LeCesne, Theodore W., obituary, 1998
Box 28 Folder 9 Lewis, William S. “Bill,” obituary [1986]
Box 28 Folder 10 Neville, Bessie R., obituary [1991]
Box 28 Folder 11 Pope-Turner, Sebelle, obituary and funeral program, 2000
Box 28 Folder 12 Shannon, R. Elizabeth, obituary, 2000
Box 28 Folder 13 Spivey, Arthric “Mama Arthric,” obituary [1992]
Box 28 Folder 14 Stamps, George M., funeral program, 1983
Box 28 Folder 15 Steele, W. Beatrice, obituary [1991]
Box 28 Folder 16 Thomas, Willis A., obituary [undated]

SERIES 7: SUBJECT RESEARCH FILES, 1970-1992

Box 28 Folder 17 Bank annual reports, Chicago area minority ownership, 1976-1980
Box 28 Folder 18 Book, The Story of Seventy-Five years of the Chicago and Northern District Association of Club Women, Inc., 1906-1981
Box 28 Folder 19 Chicago Region PTA, speech by Dr. Epps, 1978
Box 28 Folder 20 Community broadcasting organizations, 1977
Box 28 Folder 21 Event program, Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians 13th Anniversary International Summerfest, 1978
Box 28 Folder 22 Event program, Coordinating Council of Community Organizations (CCCO) Freedom Day Diploma, 1963
Box 28 Folder 23 Event program, Corneal Davis “Roast,” Idlewild Lot Owners Association, 1977
Box 28 Folder 24 Guidebook, An Introduction to Afrikan Languages, by Dr. Biyangekala H.T. Maponyane, 1970
Box 28 Folder 25 News clippings, urban housing, education, employment, civil rights, 1980-1992
Box 28 Folder 26 Newsletters, banking and investment groups, 1976-1981
Box 28 Folder 27 Pamphlet, National Council of Negro Women, “You’re One in a Million” [1980s]
Box 28 Folder 28 Policy study, The Black Community and Revenue Sharing, Joint Center for Political Studies [1973]
Box 28 Folder 29 Policy study, Economic Impact of the Negro Traveler, ed. Clarence Markham, Jr., circa 1970
Box 28 Folder 30 S.B. Fuller, testimonial biography handbill, 1975
Box 28 Folder 31 Serially published policy studies, 1971-1979, undated
Box 28 Folder 32 U.S. Bureau of the Census reports, 1980

SERIES 8: ORAL HISTORY (Audio) 2009

Box 29 Folder 1 Interview of Charles A. Davis, about Chester Commodore and the Chicago Defender, by Michael Flug and Lorin Nails-Smoote (notes only), 2009
Box 29 Audio-cassette 1 Interview of Charles Davis, by Michael Flug and Lorin Nails-Smoote, about Chester Commodore and the Chicago Defender, on September 29, 2009 (1 of 2)
Box 29 Audio-cassette Interview of Charles Davis, by Michael Flug and Lorin Nails-Smoote, about Chester Commodore and the Chicago Defender, on September 29, 2009 (2 of 2)
Box 29 Audio-cassette 3 Interview of Earl Calloway, by Michael Flug and Lorin Nails-Smoote, about Chester Commodore and the Chicago Defender, on September 30, 2009 (1 of 1)

SERIES 9: PHOTOGRAPHS, 1946-2002

Box 30 1 Charles A. Davis, as Chicago Defender reporter at Henry Wallace Press Conference, November, 1946
Box 30 2 Charles A. Davis (portrait), as executive director of National Insurance Association [1966]
Box 30 3 Charles A. Davis (portrait), circa 1970
Box 30 4 Charles A. Davis (portrait) as executive director of National Insurance Association [1970s]
Box 30 5 Charles A. Davis, George Romney, with others, at Minority Housing Conference, Washington DC, 1969
Box 30 6 [Mr.] Burkett, Jim Marx, Charles A. Davis, circa 1970
Box 30 7 Charles A. Davis (portrait), circa 1973
Box 30 8 Charles A. Davis, National Insurance Association (NIA), 1975
Box 30 9 Charles A. Davis, National Insurance Association (NIA), circa 1975
Box 30 10 Charles A. Davis, National Insurance Association (NIA), circa 1975
Box 30 11 Charles A. Davis at podium, unidentified event, circa 1975
Box 30 12 Charles A. Davis at unidentified event, circa 1975
Box 30 13 Charles A. Davis at unidentified event, circa 1975
Box 30 14 Charles A. Davis at podium, unidentified event, [1977-1978]
Box 30 15 Rosalie Davis and Charles A. Davis at Millionaire’s Club, circa 1978
Box 30 16 Charles A. Davis (portrait) [1979-1983)
Box 30 17 Charles A. Davis (portrait) [1979-1983] Negative only
Box 30 18 Charles A. Davis and Mayor Jane Byrne, [1979-1983]
Box 30 19 Charles A. Davis, National Business League annual convention, 1980
Box 30 20 Charles A. Davis, at podium, Chicago City Colleges annual administrator/faculty workshop, 1985
Box 30 21 Charles A. Davis, see also photos 22 and 23 [1980s]
Box 30 22 Clarice Durham, [unidentified], Rosalie Davis, Charles A. Davis [1980s]
Box 30 23 Clarice Durham, [unidentified], Rosalie Davis, Charles A. Davis [1980s]
Box 30 24 Charles A. Davis [informal, undated]
Box 30 25 Charles A. Davis, at podium, Black Public Relations Society meeting [Chicago, late 1990s] (photo by Bill Kenner, BK Productions)
Box 30 26 Charles A. Davis (portrait) [1980s] see also photo 27
Box 30 27 Charles A. Davis at desk [1980s] see also photo 26
Box 30 28 Charles A. Davis (portrait), undated (photo by H.A. Martin)
Box 30 29 Charles A. Davis (portrait), undated (photo by H.A. Martin)
Box 30 30 Charles A. Davis (portrait), circa 2002
Box 30 31 Charles A. Davis (portrait), undated
Box 30 32 Roland M. Gibson, account representative, Charles A. Davis & Associates, circa 1974
Box 30 33 Richard Linyard (portrait) circa 1975
Box 30 34 Richard Linyard, Kermit Lee, Essie Rowell, Chicago Urban League event, 1975
Box 30 35 Coretta Scott King, Al Nellum, Lloyd Davis, at planning committee, Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Non-violent Social Change benefit, 1980
Box 30 36 Charles Ian White, Frances White, Jessica White, Christmas 1982
Box 30 37 George Jones (portrait) undated
Box 30 38 John Edward Johnson (portrait) undated
Box 30 39 Hon. Eddie CIRCA Johnson (portrait) undated
Box 30 40 Hon. Eddie C. Johnson (portrait) undated (negative only)
Box 30 41 Hon. Eddie C. Johnson (portrait) undated (proof sheet only)
Box 30 42 Hon. Eddie C. Johnson (portrait) undated (photo by Dellahoussaye)
Box 30 43 [Mrs.] Eddie C. Johnson, Hon. Eddie C. Johnson (portrait) undated
Box 30 44 [Mrs.] Eddie C. Johnson, Hon. Eddie C. Johnson undated (proof sheets only)
Box 30 45 Edgrick C. Johnson (portrait) 1996
Box 30 46 Edgrick C. Johnson, 1996 (proof sheets only)
Box 30 47 Group photo including Charles A. Davis, Dolores Cross, Etta Moten Barnett, Myrtle Todd, Don Baer, Jacqueline Moore, 1991
Box 30 48 Group photo including Charles A. Davis, Etta Moten Barnett, Don Baer, 1991
Box 30 49 George R. Brokemond (portrait) 1970s
Box 30 50 George R. Brokemond, President, Highland Community Bank (portrait) 1970s
Box 30 51 George R. Brokemond, President, Highland Community Bank (portrait) [1970s] (negative only)
Box 30 52 George R. Brokemond, President, Highland Community Bank, presenting gift from bank to William Harold Hardy, Executive Secretary NAACP (Chicago Southside Branch), 1976
Box 30 53 George R. Brokemond, President, Highland Community Bank, presenting gift from bank to William Harold Hardy, Executive Secretary NAACP (Chicago Southside Branch), 1976
Box 30 54 George R. Brokemond, President, Highland Community Bank, presenting gift from bank to William Harold Hardy, Executive Secretary NAACP (Chicago Southside Branch), 1976
Box 30 55 William P. Jordan, Kraft Inc.; George Brokemond, Highland Community Bank; Robert James, N.B.A.; Herm Willie, Kraft Inc.; at announcement of $4 million National Time Deposit program, 1977
Box 30 56 Charles A. Davis, [unidentified], George Brokemond, Highland Community Bank [1970s]
Box 30 57 Charles A. Davis, George Brokemond, [unidentified], Highland Community Bank [1970s]
Box 30 58 Emmett H. Cooper [Highland Community Bank, 1970s]
Box 30 59 Robert L. Kimbrough, D.D.S. [Highland Community Bank, 1970s]
Box 30 60 Charles F. Moore [Highland Community Bank, 1970s]
Box 30 61 Rev. Malachy Smith [Highland Community Bank, 1970]
Box 30 62 Phillip J. Drotning [Highland Community Bank, 1970s]
Box 30 63 James A. Pate [Highland Community Bank, 1970s]
Box 30 64 Ellis Reid, Esq. [Highland Community Bank, 1970s]
Box 30 65 Rev. Wilbur N. Daniel [Highland Community Bank, 1970s]
Box 30 66 Rev. James Graham [Highland Community Bank, 1970s]
Box 30 67 Floyd Mix, D.D.S. [Highland Community Bank, 1970s]
Box 30 68 James A. Dickey [Highland Community Bank, 1970s]
Box 30 69 George Vrimond [Highland Community Bank, 1970s]
Box 30 70 Harry Rivers [Highland Community Bank, 1970s]
Box 30 71 William Hetler, Rodney Lunford, Eyvonne Moore [Highland Community Bank, 1970s]
Box 30 72 Glen L.Taylor [Highland Community Bank, 1970s]
Box 30 73 Eyvonne Moore, vice president/cashier; Winifred Lowery, vice president/marketing [Highland Community Bank, 1970s]
Box 30 74 Winifred Lowery, vice president/marketing; Eyvonne Moore, vice president/cashier [Highland Community Bank, 1970s]
Box 30 75 Eyvonne Moore (portrait), undated
Box 30 76 Erma N. Cannon, manager/mortgage department [Highland Community Bank, 1970s]
Box 30 77 Gene Armstrong [Highland Community Bank, 1970s]
Box 30 78 [Unidentified, undated] (photo by H.A. Martin Photographic Service)
Box 30 79 Highland Community Bank, teller windows and customers [1970s]
Box 30 80 Highland Community Bank, officers in lobby [1970s]
Box 30 81 Highland Community Bank, drive-up teller window with teller [1970s]
Box 30 82 Highland Community Bank, promotional event with TV and stereo promotional gifts [1970s]
Box 30 83 Highland Community Bank small business bank customer (dry cleaners) [1970s]
Box 30 84 Highland Community Bank small business bank customer (dry cleaners [1970s]
Box 30 85 Highland Community Bank small business bank customer [unidentified; 1970s]
Box 30 86 Highland Community Bank small business bank customer (dental office) [1970s]
Box 30 87 Highland Community Bank small business bank customer (dental office) [1970s]
Box 30 88 Highland Community Bank small business bank customer (moving company) [1970s]
Box 30 89 Highland Community Bank customer (church [1970s]
Box 30 90 Highland Community Bank, customer home (mortgage) [1970s]
Box 30 91 Highland Community Bank building, 1701 W. 87th St., Chicago, 1980
Box 30 92 Highland Community Bank building, 1701 W. 87th St., Chicago, 1976
Box 30 93 Highland Community Bank building, 1701 W. 87th St., Chicago, 1976.
Box 30 94 Highland Community Bank building, 1701 W. 87th St., Chicago, 1976
Box 30 95 Highland Community Bank Building, 1701 W. 87th St., Chicago, 1976
Box 30 96 Highland Community Bank staff and plant [1977-1978] (proof sheets only)

Series 10: Memorabilia, circa 1977-1978

Box 29 1 item Button, “Nothing Says Love Like Insurance,” National Insurance Association (NIA), circa 1977-1978
Print