Books for fans of Nicola Yoon’s Instructions for Dancing

Nicola Yoon is known for her tearjerker romances and that continues with her latest release, Instructions For Dancing. Following in the footsteps of Everything, Everything and The Sun Is Also A Star, Yoon brings us another magical love story following Evie Thomas, who’s strictly anti-love after she develops the ability to see exactly how anyone’s relationship ends. However, after enrolling at a dance studio and meeting an intriguing dance partner, Evie’s stance on love is up in the air. Prepare your heart for another swoon-worthy romance. And if just one isn’t enough, check out my recommendations below!


The love doctor is calling in The Secret of A Heart Note! Or if you’re asking the townspeople, the love witch. Mimosa and her mother are aromateurs, using their extreme smelling abilities to help people fall in love. However, their work forces them to neglect their own love interests. When Mimosa starts to fall for a handsome classmate and accidentally gives his mother a love elixir, things get a bit complicated.

I Wanna Be Where You Are is a dancer’s tale of romance, deception and chasing your dreams. When Chloe takes a trip to audition for her dream ballet conservatory, she does so unbeknownst to her mother and with her annoying neighbor who insists on tagging along. This coming-of-age romance will dance across your mind for all the right reasons.

Rebel Belle is an action-packed story that will keep you on the edge of your seat. Harper Price is a regular student until a bathroom encounter at the homecoming dance leaves her with some extreme abilities. She’s tasked with protecting her fellow classmate/archnemesis, David, to make sure an ancient prophecy is fulfilled. Rachel Hawkins gives us action, mystery and romance in this funny yet heartfelt story.

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