Back in Time: Teen Books about Time Travel

Whether they're falling backward, jumping forward or shifting sideways, teen time travel adventures are always fun. While movies like Back to the Future or the new Netflix movie Senior Year come to mind, there are tons of similar books. These are just a few of my favorites.

While visiting Paris, Andi finds a diary written by another teenage girl, Alexandrine, during the height of the deadly French revolution. In Revolution, Andi is drawn deeper into the mystery of what happened to Alex and the parallels between their lives. Things only get stranger when the line between past and present starts to break down.

The Girl From Everywhere has one of the most original time travel mechanics I've come across. Nix's father has a ship that can travel anywhere, any time, so long as he has a map to it. Their odd collection of crewmates, collected from across time, help them liberate some of the world's greatest treasures from their rightful owners.

Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children is not only a time travel story but also takes place almost entirely inside a time loop. Jacob falls back through time and finds himself in World War II England. There he finds a home full of children with unusual powers that live the same day over and over and finds himself facing danger he never could have imagined.

Maybe traveling between dimensions doesn't quite fit the theme, but A Thousand Pieces of You is so great I had to include it anyway. Marguerite's parents are the inventors of a device that allows the user to jump to other universes parallel to our own. When her father is murdered by one of his students, who takes off with one of the devices, she decides to take one herself and hunt him down, no matter how far it might take her.

What other time travel books would you recommend?

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