2020 Teen Books for National Coming Out Day

October 11 is National Coming Out Day, a time to celebrate LGBT/queer acceptance. For me, coming out in high school was a liberating experience. But if you don’t feel safe, comfortable or ready, that’s totally fine; don’t ever feel that you have to. But maybe you can celebrate with these teen coming out books that came out earlier this year!

How Do We Relationship?: You know how most romance stories end once the couple finally gets together? This graphic novel totally flips that around. Saeko and Miwa become girlfriends at the beginning of the story before figuring out the whole friend thing. Can the relationship succeed as they get to know each other better?

Felix Ever After: About a year after coming out as trans, Felix realizes that although he's definitely not a girl, the identity of "boy" doesn’t completely sit right. Does a perfect label exist, or is the concept of labels too limiting? Felix Ever After is a moving story about friendship, first love and the nuances of gender.

All Boys Aren't Blue: Have you ever watched those videos of gender reveal parties? Pink is for girls, blue is for boys. But not all boys fit the stereotypical boy equals blue mold. George M. Johnson's memoir-manifesto is a beautifully written book about growing up Black and queer. Watch our Speak On It author chat with Johnson to learn more about his life and writing process!

You Should See Me in A Crown: Prom at Liz's high school seems like a popularity contest for students who are rich, white and straight. Liz is none of those things. But winning the title of prom queen could help fund her college dreams, so she decides to compete. It’s an uphill battle against privilege, and there’s another complication too… she starts to fall in love with a competitor.

What are your favorite LGBT/queer teen books? Share below!

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