1938 Blackhawks Win Stanley Cup

The Blackhawks limped into the 1938 playoffs with a 14-25-9 regular season record. The Hawks went on to defeat the Montreal Canadiens and New York Americans in the first and second rounds. Despite their hot streak, the Hawks had a serious issue to contend with as they headed to Toronto for Game One of the Stanley Cup Finals against the Maple Leafs.

Mike Karakas, the Hawks goaltender, injured his foot in the final game of the Americans series. The backup goalie, Paul Goodman, wasn't traveling with the team for the playoffs. The Hawks had few options at this point. The league gave them permission to use Alfie Moore. At the time, Moore was goalie for a minor league club. However, at the exact moment Hawks team captain Johnny Gottslieg tracked him down, he was bellied up to the bar of a Toronto tavern. Moore was hustled over to the rink and presented to Hawks coach Bill Stewart. Stewart was immediately dismissive. How could he place his team's fate in the hands of an inebriated minor league goaltender? Despite his apprehensions, Stewart realized he had no other options.

The Maple Leafs got off to a hot start,  scoring on their first shot, but that would be the only goal Moore would let past. The Hawks would win Game One 3-1. Toronto bounced back in Game Two and walloped the Hawks 5-1 with Goodman now in the net. Karakas was able to return to goal with a steel toe in his skate for Games Three and Four in Chicago. In front of a record-setting crowd at Chicago Stadium, the Hawks took Game Three 2-1. A few day later in front of another huge home crowd, the Hawks scorched the Leafs, beating them 4-1. The fat lady had sung. The Hawks had won the Stanley Cup again.

To learn how much Alfie Moore was paid for helping to win Game One, you'll have to take a look at The Chicago Black Hawks Story by George Vass. You'll also enjoy Hockey Chicago Style by Paul Greenland, which is filled with photographs of the Blackhawks throughout all the years.

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