Irma Cayton Wertz Papers

Dates: 1915-2005
Size: 6 linear feet
Repository: Chicago Public Library, Woodson Regional Library, Vivian G. Harsh Research Collection of Afro-American History and Literature, 9525 S. Halsted Street, Chicago, IL 60628
Collection Number: 2004/10
Provenance: Donated by Irma Cayton Wertz, 2004.
Access: No restrictions
Citation: When quoting material from this collection the preferred citation is: Irma Cayton Wertz Papers, [Box #, Folder #], Harsh Research Collection, Woodson Regional Library, Chicago Public Library
Processed by: Jeanie Child, Harsh Archival Processing Project

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE

Irma Cayton Wertz, through her marriage to Horace R. Cayton, played a significant role in the Chicago Black Renaissance of the 1930s and 1940s. Irma alongside her husband helped foster the work of African American writers and artists. A Fisk University graduate, she helped Horace carry out his groundbreaking research with other scholars in the new “Chicago School” of sociology at the University of Chicago. Irma was employed as a social worker and also volunteered in the settlement house directed by Horace, Good Shepherd (later Parkway) Community Center in Chicago's South Side African American community. After the United States entered World War II she served in the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC, later WAC) as a member of its first “colored” officer's class. There she worked to eradicate the army's segregationist practices. In the 1950s she settled with her second husband, Dr. William John “Jack” Wertz, in Detroit, where she spent over 50 years as a volunteer community leader in arts and education.

Born Irma Irene Jackson on May 8, 1911 in Brunswick, Georgia, she experienced military life in the segregated United States Army early. Her father, Dr. R.N. Jackson, was a physician who served during World War I as captain in the Meharry Medical Group, a segregated African American medical unit stationed at Fort Des Moines in Iowa. As a World War II WAC, Wertz later would recognize the very building at Fort Des Moines in which that group had been stationed. Irma grew up in Brunswick and attended Fisk University. After receiving her B.A. Wertz proceeded with graduate studies in social work. In 1935 she met Horace R. Cayton at Fisk while working as an assistant in the social science department. He had taken a one-year position at Fisk teaching economics and labor issues. The two fell in love and were married in November 1935 in Chicago.

By 1936 they had found housing in Chicago's renowned “Rosenwald,” or Michigan Boulevard Garden Apartments, at 47th Street and South Michigan Avenue. They lived not far from the University of Chicago where Horace Cayton was pursuing his graduate studies with Robert Park, W. Lloyd Warner, Louis Wirth, and other founders of the Chicago School of Sociology. From 1936 to 1939 Horace also was hired to direct a series of research programs carried out by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in Chicago, including sociological research in the urban African American community. He also wrote Black Workers and the New Unions (1939) and published extensively on these topics, especially the issue of residential segregation. Meanwhile Irma attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts, was employed as a social worker at the Children's Placement Bureau, and handled the couple's complicated finances while managing their household. Many of Chicago's academic and artistic community found welcome there. Well-educated, Irma helped Horace organize and write his manuscripts and deal with his research projects while she shared Horace's friendship with such luminaries as Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Paul Robeson, and Katherine Dunham.

The WPA project office was located at 47th Street and South Parkway in the Good Shepherd (Congregational Church) Community Center, renamed Parkway Community Center in the early 1940s. Horace found himself more and more involved with the Center's programs in the community, and so did Irma. She especially contributed to the resident Skyloft Players, a theater company that presented works by such authors as Hughes and Wright.

Having received a Rosenwald Fellowship to study low-cost housing in Amsterdam and London, Horace set sail with Irma for Great Britain in July 1939. They dismissed signs of impending war until Hitler invaded Poland on September 1, and then found themselves nearly trapped in France. After a scramble to acquire tickets on the President Roosevelt they reached American shores at the end of September. Horace returned to his many projects and studies. In December he was chosen to administer the expanding Good Shepherd Community Center, already the largest African American settlement house in the world. This opportunity to combine scholarship and practice represented a dream come true for him, and a fertile source for his writing. Meanwhile Irma taught Red Cross first-aid classes and joined efforts to rescue Jewish refugees. Horace was soon hired to contribute to the Pittsburgh Courier on issues important to him. But his vocal attacks on America's Jim Crow while African Americans volunteered for military duty attracted the notice of the FBI. Although subsequent investigation concluded he probably was not a Communist Party member, the Caytons would continue to be victims of FBI surveillance.

In 1940, however, Irma and Horace's marriage had begun to unravel badly. Not only was he unfaithful, but his emotional state was increasingly volatile and complicated by substance abuse. Irma divorced him in October of 1940, then agreed to a remarriage in April of 1941. As the war worsened, she added Delta Sigma Theta Sorority and the Women’s Defense Corps of America to her volunteer defense agenda. In July 1942 Irma applied for acceptance into the first Officer Training School for African American women, in the new Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAACs, later WACs). As one of four African American women chosen from Chicago, she was sent to Fort Des Moines, Iowa, and began training immediately.

The W.A.A.C. was an auxiliary and not officially within the army's chain of command. However, the blatantly segregated status of the “colored” WAACs at the Fort, beginning with separate “white” and “colored” entrances to the mess hall, spurred Irma to send information about this situation to the outside world. Her husband as a Courier writer was perfectly situated to publicize it. Thereupon the Fort became a destination for curious journalists. Mary McLeod Bethune, then advisor to First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, paid a visit. Slowly the Jim Crow labels disappeared—but Irma had gained a reputation that would hinder her progress in the army.

Upon graduation from officer training at the end of August 1942 Irma was transferred to WAAC headquarters in the office of WAAC director Oveta Culp Hobby in Washington, DC. But she was assigned few duties and soon requested a transfer. Sent back to Fort Des Moines to await further assignment, Irma was promoted to 2nd. Officer, the equivalent to army lieutenant. In November she was posted to Fort Huachuca in Ariz. as officer in charge of the first WAAC Post HQ Company, with her friend Lt. Violet Askins as executive officer. Fort Huachuca was home to some ten thousand African American servicemen training for duty, and the WAACs' arrival in December was met with great excitement. There was a grand military display including military band, post commander inspection, and a march of WAACs to quarters where Irma and other officers welcomed them.

Despite the superior ratings given Irma's unit she was not promoted in the spring of 1943. In August of 1943 the WAAC was incorporated into the army as the Women's Army Corps (WAC), and Irma and the others had the opportunity to re-enlist. She was named Officer in Charge of the new WAC unit.

Its African American personnel called Fort Huachuca "the plantation" because the Post Commander was a southern-born segregationist, and he saw Irma as a “troublemaker.” Segregation existed on many levels, but the primary issue was the inappropriate post assignments given to highly trained WAACs and WACs. These college-educated women had trained for work as chauffeur, truck driver, hospital lab, X-ray & pathology, physical therapy aide, bookkeeper, photographer's assistant, water & sewage analyst, map maker, cook & mess sergeant. Instead, they were relegated to kitchen work, scrubbing the quarters, and other menial tasks. Irma finally sidestepped protocol and requested an official investigation from WAC headquarters. As a result, the post commander was notified he should make appropriate WAC post assignments. Then, in mid-1944 Irma was promoted to captain. Soon after that a request came from Fort Lewis, Wash., for a WAC unit and Irma was chosen to command that group. In December 1944 she led them on the long train journey to Fort Lewis. However, her struggle for proper assignments for her WACs continued.

Irma had divorced Horace Cayton for a second and final time in September 1944. In December she married William John “Jack” Wertz, a lieutenant stationed at Fort Huachuca. After the war ended she was discharged in December 1945. She returned to Fort Huachuca, and the Wertzes traveled to Mexico. Discovering that the GI Bill would cover their college tuition in Mexico City, Irma returned to graduate school to pursue Latin American studies while Jack completed his pre-medical undergraduate work in 1948. Also in 1948 their son Jackson was born, also in Mexico City. From 1948 until 1954 Dr. Wertz completed his medical training at Meharry Medical School followed by psychiatric residencies in Fort Lewis and in Alaska, while Irma returned to Brunswick to care for son Jackson and teach in the local high school. In 1954 Dr. Wertz received an appointment to a psychiatric residency in Detroit, Michigan, and the couple made that city their permanent home.

A self-styled “professional volunteer,” Irma Cayton Wertz immediately became active in the Detroit community, serving as president of the Detroit PTA Council for a number of years and advocating for public education. At the Detroit Repertory Theatre she assumed major responsibility for fundraising and served several decades on the board, continuing her involvement for nearly fifty years until shortly before her death in 2007. Simultaneously she served in the Detroit Receiving Hospital Services League and the Hutzel Hospital Pastoral Care Service. She started her own stationery company, “T's and Totes.”

Dr. William John “Jack” Wertz served as psychiatric administrator for the state of Michigan. He died suddenly in 1975. Irma Cayton Wertz passed away on February 20, 2007 at Providence Hospital in Southfield, Michigan, survived by her son W. Jackson "Jack" Wertz.

Sources

SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE

The Irma Cayton Wertz Papers include official military documents and correspondence, Wertz's own memoir manuscripts about her WAC army experience, and nearly ninety photographs of her and her WAC compatriots at Forts Des Moines, Huachuca, and Lewis (1942-1945). The military correspondence includes her appeal to WAC Command Headquarters for assistance in getting appropriate assignments for the women in her unit. A generous clippings file provides dates and legal context for her years served in the military as well as rosters of African American unit members by name. The clippings, some from the Pittsburgh Courier, include Irma Cayton interviews or statements in which she discussed her strong feeling that it was her patriotic duty to serve in the WAAC/WAC. The few serial publications from Fort Huachuca provide further views of personnel and activities at the post. The photographs, many taken by the U.S. Army's Signal Corps at the various posts, provide a rare view of African American military history, particularly of Fort Huachuca. Some photograph subjects cannot be identified by name at this time. Memorabilia of interest include Irma Cayton's membership card to the Women's Defense Corps of America, Chicago Chapter, 1942.

Throughout the collection, particularly in both clippings and photographs, the researcher will find reference to names of African American women who went on to serve with distinction, including overseas, such as Charity Adams Early, Violet Ward Askins Hill, Mildred Carter, Mary Kearney, Harriet West, Ruth Wade, and Dovey Johnson Roundtree.

The small amount of correspondence from Irma's husband Horace R. Cayton, and their mutual friends, provides just a glimpse of her impact upon Horace's work as an academic, arts supporter, and social activist.

Many of the materials in the Wertz Papers arrived in scrapbook format. A number of photographs, letters, and small memorabilia, originally glued onto black scrapbook photo pages, could not be separated completely from the photo page or from each other. Pending future conservation activity, all these materials are available "as is" in this collection. Some of the scrapbook pages were photocopied before being disassembled, and these photocopies are available for viewing the original arrangement (Box 1, folders 58-60).

The Irma Cayton Wertz Papers are arranged into the following series:

 

Series 1: Cayton Wertz Biographical

Arranged in chronological order. See also Series 4 and 5 for documents that include Irma Cayton Wertz personal information.

Series 2: Manuscripts

Contains two memoirs by Wertz, the second an essay in a published work.

Series 3: Correspondence--general

Arranged in alphabetical order by correspondent. Mostly of a congratulatory nature, sent by friends to Wertz upon her induction into the Officers Training School, July 1942. Includes letters and telegrams from her husband, Horace R. Cayton. Please note that originals of Box 1, folders 10 and 14 are stored in Box 4 (oversize).

Series 4: Correspondence--military

Arranged chronologically. Correspondence in Box 1, folder 22 involves Wertz's attempts to get women in her unit appropriate work assignments commensurate with their ability and training.

Series 5: WAAC/WAC Military Service Material

Arranged chronologically. A variety of documents were generated by bodies within the military chain of command. Please note that they include War Department Orders No. 30 and 34, listing Wertz's name change after marriage to Lt. Wertz and her assignment to court-martial duty.

Series 6: WAAC/WAC Veterans Material

Arranged alphabetically by title. Includes reunion programs, newsletters, etc. that reference WACs documented within other Series.

Series 7: Clippings

Arranged chronologically, except for the article about Dovey Johnson Roundtree by Katie McCabe, clipped from the Washingtonian and placed first in Box 1, folder 44.

Series 8: Serials

Arranged chronologically, but layered in oversize box 4 with other materials.

Series 9: Photographs

Because many of the photographs are not identified or dated, they have been arranged somewhat arbitrarily. An attempt was made to arrange the photographs into either a "personal" or a "military" category, and then chronologically within each category. Please note that photo #8 (Meharry Medical Group scan) is stored in Box 3, out of numerical order.

Series 10: Memorabilia

Listed in alphabetical order by name of object. However, please note that by size and condition some memorabilia items are stored in Box 1, folders 55-61, and others in oversize Box 4, items 4-17.

Related materials at the Chicago Public Library include:

Related materials at other institutions include:

CONTAINER LIST

Series 1: Cayton Wertz Biographical

Box 1 Folder 1 Wertz’s U.S. Army Separation Qualification Record, December 28, 1945
Box 1 Folder 2 Wertz's PTA (Parent Teachers Association of America) clipping, 1970
Box 1 Folder 3 Wertz's Certificate of Military Service, 1976

Series 2: Manuscripts

Box 1 Folder 4 "A First WAC," by Irma Cayton Wertz, undated
Box 1 Folder 5 "Skyloft Theatre and Players," by Irma Cayton Wertz, circa 2005
Box 1 Folder 6 Herstories: Tribute to African American Women . . . During World War II compiled by Gladys S. Carter, National Association of Black Military Women, containing "Irma Cayton Wertz" essay, Great Bridge Press, Inc., undated

Series 3: Correspondence – general

Box 1 Folder 7 Barber, Courtenay Jr., July 17, 1942
Box 1 Folder 8 Barnett, Mae, circa July 19, 1942
Box 1 Folder 9 Bruseaux, Sheridan A., July 10, 1942
Box 1 Folder 10 Carter, Philip M. (Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures), January 18, 1943
Box 1 Folder 11 Cayton, Horace R., July-December 1942 (see also Box 4 folder 18, oversize)
Box 1 Folder 12 Cayton, Horace R. and Lt. Irma J.(Christmas card), 1942 or 1943
Box 1 Folder 13 Felix, Cecil, December 5, 1942
Box 1 Folder 14 Iveson, Annette, July 15, 1942
Box 1 Folder 15 Klein, Lawrence Robert, December 21, 1942 (see also Box 4 folder 18, oversize)
Box 1 Folder 16 Miller, Emily, July 19, 1942
Box 1 Folder 17 Robinson, D. Thelma, August 1943
Box 1 Folder 18 Williams, Frances, 1942
Box 1 Folder 19 [last name not known—possibly Mitchell] Lucille, 1942
Box 1 Folder 20 [Name not given] to Irma Cayton Wertz, May 8, 1944

Series 4: Correspondence – Military

Box 1 Folder 21 [name not given] to Irma Cayton Wertz, 1942
Box 1 Folder 22 Roy L. Ferguson, National Youth Administration (Iowa) to Irma Cayton Wertz, October 20, 1942
Box 1 Folder 23 Irma Cayton Wertz and Helen G. Gardiner, WAC Service Command Director (re morale of “colored” troops), 1944-1945
Box 1 Folder 24 Doris (last name not given) of Ft. Huachuca Signal Corps to Irma Cayton Wertz, undated

Series 5: WAAC/WAC Military Service Material

Box 1 Folder 25 African American WAAC Officer Candidate Selectees, U.S. Army Recruiting and Induction Station, Chicago, July 11, 1942
Box 1 Folder 26 WAAC Enrollee List of Permitted Personal Equipment, circa 1942
Box 1 Folder 27 Notes by Irma Cayton Wertz re military classification, circa 1942
Box 1 Folder 28 Program booklet, “Bi-vo-ac WAAC,” musical comedy directed by Irma Cayton Wertz, Ft. Huachuca, March 1943
Box 1 Folder 29 Pass for Captain LaMoure with vehicle, June 19, 1943
Box 1 Folder 30 “Army Hit Kit of Popular Songs,” U.S. Army Special Services Division, circa 1943
Box 1 Folder 31 War Department pamphlet, “Command of Negro Troops,” February 29, 1944
Box 1 Folder 32 Program booklet, “Closing Exercise, WAC,” Station Hospital No. 1, Ft. Huachuca, May 6, 1944
Box 1 Folder 33 WAAC Clothing and Equipment Procurement Table, Ft. DesMoines, August 15, 1944
Box 1 Folder 34 WAC Section SCU 1922 Roster, with AGCT Scores, October 3, 1944
Box 1 Folder 35 WAC Section SCU 1922 Memo re Transfer of Company Funds, Irma Cayton Wertz to Consuelo Bland, Ft. Huachuca, November 17, 1944
Box 1 Folder 36 Leave of Absence form, Ft. Lewis (blank), circa 1944-1945
Box 1 Folder 37 War Department Special Order No. 30, includes name change Irma Jackson Cayton to Irma Jackson Wertz, February 3, 1945
Box 1 Folder 38 Headquarters 13th Engineering Training group, Ft. Lewis Special Order No. 34, listing Irma J. Wertz appointed summary court-martial, April 13, 1945
Box 1 Folder 39 Memo to Ft. Lewis Commanding Officer from Irma Cayton Wertz re date of physical examination, June 15, 1945
Box 1 Folder 40 Program booklet, special honorary party for Col. F.S. Besson, Ft. Lewis, undated

Series 6: WAAC/WAC Veterans Material

Box 1 Folder 41 Ft. Lewis WACs Reunion, 1985-1986
Box 1 Folder 42 National Association of Black Military Women, 2004
Box 1 Folder 43 Women in Military Service for America Memorial Foundation Inc., 1999-2000
Box 1 Folder 44 Women’s Army Corps Veterans Association, 1982-1988

Series 7: Clippings

Box 1 Folder 45 Article, [“Dovey’s Story”] Dovey Johnson Roundtree, by Katie McCabe, Washingtonian, March 2002
Box 1 Folder 46 Clippings, July 1-19, 1942
Box 1 Folder 47 Clippings, July 20-31, 1942
Box 1 Folder 48 Clippings, August-September, 1942
Box 1 Folder 49 Clippings, October-November, 1942
Box 1 Folder 50 Clippings, December, 1942
Box 1 Folder 51 Clippings, January, 1943
Box 1 Folder 52 Clippings, February, 1943
Box 1 Folder 53 Clippings, March, 1943
Box 1 Folder 54 Clippings, June-December, 1943
Box 1 Folder 55 Clippings, 1944-1945, undated

Series 8: Serials (see Box 4)

Series 10: Memorabilia (see also Box 4)

Box 1 Folder 56 Booklet, “What Where Why When How Who?” Ft. Huachuca Guide, Mountain states Telephone and Telegraph Company, circa 1942-1944
Box 1 Folder 57 Church program, Neighborhood Community Church, Los Angeles, 1940
Box 1 Folder 58 Greeting Card, “Remembering You on Mother’s Day,” to WACs in SCU 1922, signed Irma Cayton C.O., undated
Box 1 Folder 59 Scrapbook cover (copy)
Box 1 Folder 60 Scrapbook pages, with photos, clippings, correspondence, memorabilia (copies), circa 1942-1943
Box 1 Folder 61 Scrapbook pages, text only (copies)
Box 1 Folder 62 Sheet music, “WAAC Songs,” Special Service Branch 9th Service Command, circa 1944

Series 9: Photographs

Box 2 01 Irma Cayton Wertz, portrait, "To my dear with love, Irma," 1942 (with negative)
Box 2 02 Irma Cayton Wertz, "Irma Irene Jackson" as a little girl, circa 1915-1920
Box 2 03 Irma Cayton Wertz (2nd from left), Horace R. Cayton (right), California, circa January 1943
Box 2 04 Richard Bernard "Red" Skelton (left), Irma Cayton Wertz (right), California, circa February 1943 (see also clipping, February 4, 1943)
Box 2 05 Richard Bernard "Red" Skelton (portrait), autographed to Lt. Cayton . . . Always, Red Skelton," circa 1942-1943. Photograph from Red Skelton, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Box 2 06 Hollywood Bowl, circa 1942. Postcard, Brookwell Photo
Box 2 07 Hollywood Bowl, circa 1942. Postcard, Brookwell Photos
---- 08 see box 3
Box 2 09 Lucille Mitchell (left) and Irma Cayton Wertz (right), Women's Defense Corps of America, Dorie Miller Chapter, greeting singer Marian Anderson (center) at train station, 1941. Chicago Daily News Photo (with negative)
Box 2 10 Harriet West (center), with fellow WAAC officers at farewell party before assignment to Washington DC, Ft. Des Moines, September 1942. See also clipping, September 12, 1942 for IDs
Box 2 11 Harriet M. West (left), Irma Cayton Wertz (right), Ft. Des Moines, 1942. See also clipping, September 12, 1942
Box 2 12 2 African American WAACs, not yet identified, Ft. Des Moines (?), circa 1942
Box 2 13 WAAC, African American, not yet identified, Ft. Des Moines (?), circa 1942
Box 2 14 WAAC, African American, not yet identified, Ft. Des Moines (?), circa 1942
Box 2 15 Irma Cayton Wertz image superimposed on Ft. Huachuca scene, circa 1942-1945.With negative.
Box 2 16 African American WAACs arriving by train, Ft. Huachuca, December, 1942. Official U.S. Signal Corps photo
Box 2 17 African American WAACs arriving by truck, Ft. Huachuca, December, 1942. Official U.S. Signal Corps photo
Box 2 18 African American WAACs walking from truck to housing, Ft. Huachuca, December, 1942. Official U.S. Signal Corps photo
Box 2 19 Irma Cayton Wertz, 2nd from right, welcoming African American WAACs as they arrive, Ft. Huachuca, December, 1942. Official U.S. Signal Corps photo
Box 2 20 First African American WAACs report to Ft. Huachuca, with military band & police, and prepare to march to WAAC area, December, 1942. Official U.S. Signal Corps photo
Box 2 21 African American WAACs arrive, in parade formation, Ft. Huachuca, December, 1942. Official U.S. Signal Corps photo
Box 2 22 Captain Frances Alexander, commanding officer 32nd WAAC Company, at attention in preparation of moving off in parade, Ft. Huachuca, December, 1942. Official U.S. Signal Corps photo
Box 2 23 WAAC Mail call, Ft. Huachuca, December 1942. Official U. S. Signal Corps photo
Box 2 24 Commanding officer Frances Alexander (right) interview with WAAC and army soldier, Ft. Huachuca, December, 1942. Official U.S. Signal Corps photo
Box 2 25 Mascot (32nd WAAC Company) dog, "Blitzkrieg” known as “Blitz,” Ft Huachuca, December, 1942. Official U.S. Signal Corps photo
Box 2 26 African American WAAC Quartermaster Motor Corps, “Cow Van” truck repair, December, 1942. Official U.S. Signal Corps photo
Box 2 27 African American WAACs Ruth Wade (left) and Lucille Mayo (right), Quartermaster Motor Corps, truck repair, circa 1942. Official U.S. Signal Corps photo
Box 2 28 African American WAAC Quartermaster Motor Corps, daily inspection, Ft. Huachuca, December, 1942. Official U.S. Signal Corps photo
Box 2 29 African American WAACs at first Christmas program at Ft. Huachuca, 1942. Postcards
Box 2 30 African American WAAC lab technician, Ft. Huachuca (?), 1942. Official U.S. Signal Corps photo
Box 2 31 Mercedes Jordan at piano with other African American WAACs, Jordan’s song “We’re the WAACs,” Ft. Huachuca, 1942. Official U.S. Signal Corps photo
Box 2 32 African American WAACs train as switchboard operators while male personnel they will replace watch, Ft. Huachuca, 1942. Official U.S. Signal Corps photo
Box 2 33 Lucille Mitchell, portrait, “Best wishes, Lucille,” circa 1942
Box 2 34 African American WAAC Violet Askins (?) (left) with jeep and driver, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 2 35 African American WAAC Violet Askins (left), Irma Cayton (2nd from right), H Car with drivers, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 2 36 African American WAACs drilling, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 2 37 Irma Cayton Wertz, saluting commanding officer Frances Alexander at doorway, African American company headquarters, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 2 38 Frances Camille Alexander, commanding officer (right), with 5 African American officers, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1945
Box 2 39 African American WAAC Violet Ward Askins (?) portrait, circa 1942
Box 2 40 African American WAACs marching in formation, with commanding officer Frances Alexander, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 2 41 African American WAAC (not identified), Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 2 42 Mascot (dog) of 32nd Company, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 2 43 Mascot (dog) of 32nd Company, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 2 44 African American WAAC (not identified) with mascot (dog), 32nd Company, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 2 45 Army personnel and African American WAAC (not identified) with mascot (dog) of 32nd Company, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 2 46 African American WAAC (not identified) with mascot (dog) of 32nd Company, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 2 47 Irma Cayton Wertz, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 2 48 Commanding Officer Frances Camille Alexander, with mascot (dog) “Blitz” of 32nd Company, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 2 49 African American WAAC (not identified), Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 2 50 African American WACs gather outside Company 1922 orderly room, Ft. Huachuca, 1943
Box 3 08 Meharry Group, African American Medical Reserve Corps, Ft. DesMoines, circa 1918. May include Dr. R.N. Jackson, father of Irma Cayton Wertz. Scan only. Photo by Sante K.C. Ma—(illegible)
Box 3 51 African American WAAC Violet Askins (?), Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 3 52 Irma Cayton Wertz (left), Violet Askins (?, right) with dachshund, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 3 53 Irma Cayton Wertz, picnic scene with unidentified companions, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 3 54 Violet Askins (?, right), with “Jody” army personnel (left), Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 3 55 Army personnel “Billie B” with tent, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 3 56 African American WAAC (not identified), portrait, undated
Box 3 57 Irma Cayton Wertz (left) with African American WAAC (not identified), Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 3 58 Violet Askins (?, left) and Irma Cayton Wertz (right), Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 3 59 Violet Askins (?) with kitten, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 3 60 Violet Askins (?), Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 3 61 Lena Horne, “Sweetheart of the 92nd” (division), at one of many performances at Mountain View Officer’s Club, Ft. Huachuca, AZ, circa 1942-1945
Box 3 62 WAAC performer at “Bi-Vo-Ac” musical production, 93rd division, Ft. Huachuca, 1943
Box 3 63 African American WAAC area buildings, Ft. Huachuca, 1943
Box 3 64 First African American graduating class, Medical Technicians School, S.C.U. 1922, Ft. Huachuca, 1944
Box 3 65 Cake “To Graduating Class, Hospital Technicians,” Ft. Huachuca, circa 1944
Box 3 66 African American WAC SCU 1922 Orderly Room, with organizational chart, Ft. Huachuca, 1944
Box 3 67 Frances Camille Alexander, commanding officer (right), Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 3 68 Frances Camille Alexander, commanding officer (left), Irma Cayton Wertz (right, saluting), with WAACs in formation, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 3 69 Irma Cayton Wertz (right), with unidentified army personnel (left), Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 3 70 Irma Cayton Wertz (4th from right), Frances Camille Alexander (5th from right), with African American WAACs, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 3 71 Army officer, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 3 72 African American T/Sgt Marguerite Wallace, stirring pot in kitchen, Ft. Huachuca (?), undated
Box 3 73 African American WACs arrive by bus, location not known, undated. Post card
Box 3 74 African American WACs at running track, with army personnel, Ft. Huachuca (?), undated. Post card
Box 3 75 (D. Thelma Robinson?) “to Mother Cayton, Love, Diane,” portrait, undated
Box 3 76 Irma Cayton Wertz (?, left), location not known, circa 1942-1943
Box 3 77 Marriage ceremony, Irma Cayton Wertz (right), participants not identified, Ft. Huachuca, undated. Photo by 92nd Div. 9.5.0.
Box 3 78 2 African American WAC/WAACs with signal flag, Army officer, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1944
Box 3 79 African American WAAC/WAC, not identified, portrait, undated
Box 3 80 African American WAAC/WAC, not identified (right), with young man on left, portrait, undated
Box 3 81 Irma Cayton Wertz, cutting birthday cake with African American WAAC/WAC officers at party, Ft. Huachuca, undated
Box 3 82 Irma Cayton Wertz (5th from left), with 8 African American WAAC/WACs, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1944
Box 3 83 WAAC SCU 1922 mascot (mule), with 4 African American WAACs, army groom and other personnel, Ft. Huachuca, circa 1942-1943
Box 3 84 Irma Cayton Wertz (center), Maj. Gen. Shedd and Col. Gillette, Ft. Lewis, 1944-1945. Photograph by Fort Lewis Sentinel
Box 3 85 African American WACs at Mess, Ft. Lewis, circa 1944. Photograph by Fort Lewis Sentinel
Box 3 86 Irma Cayton Wertz (center), with African American WACs at birthday party, Ft. Lewis, circa 1944. Photograph by Fort Lewis Sentinel
Box 3 87 African American WACs at Mess, Ft. Lewis, circa 1944. Photograph by Fort Lewis Sentinel
Box 3 88 Irma Cayton Wertz (center), with African American WACs at birthday party, Ft. Lewis, circa 1944. Photograph by Fort Lewis Sentinel
Box 3 89 Irma Cayton Wertz (4th from left, front) with African American WACs, Ft. Lewis, circa 1944. With Negative. Photograph by Fort Lewis Sentinel
Box 3 90 African American WACs on transport truck, Ft. Lewis, circa 1944. U.S. Army Signal Corps photo
Box 3 91 African American WACs marching in formation, Ft. Lewis, circa 1944. Photograph by Fort Lewis Sentinel
Box 3 92 African American WACs at attention, in formation, Ft. Lewis, circa 1944. Photograph by Fort Lewis Sentinel
Box 3 93 African American WACs marching in formation, Ft. Lewis, circa 1944. Photograph by Fort Lewis Sentinel
Box 3 94 Irma Cayton Wertz (right), with African American WACs at Easter celebration, Ft. Lewis (?), circa 1944. U.S. Signal Corps photo
Box 3 95 Pfc. Emily Harris, Medical lab, Ft. Lewis, 1945. U.S. Army Signal Corps photo

Series 8: Serials (Oversize)

Box 4 1 Huachuca publication, title not shown, 1 page with photos and poetry, undated
Box 4 2 Apache Sentinel, SCU 1922, Ft. Huachuca, September 22, 1944
Box 4 3 Post Script, SCU 1922, Ft. Huachuca, October 20, 1944

Series 10: Memorabilia (Oversize)

Box 4 4 Gift cards, circa 1942
Box 4 5 ID card, American Red Cross Chicago Chapter, for Irma Cayton, Chairman of First Aid, Washington Park Unit (Chicago), 1942
Box 4 6 ID card, South Side Hospital Service Plan, Inc., for Irma Cayton, 1941
Box 4 7 Membership card, Women’s Defense Corps of America, Chicago Chapter, for Irma Cayton (Wertz), 1942
Box 4 8 Pass to White House, for Irma Cayton (Wertz), October 19, 1942
Box 4 9 Post card, showing African American WAC making emergency repair on vehicle, Ft. Huachuca, undated. Made from U.S. Signal Corps photo
Box 4 10 Program, “General Electric Hour of Charm, dedicated to the WAAC,” DesMoines, Iowa, October 18, 1942
Box 4 11 Program, 3rd Signal Company Dinner Dance, Service Club No. 2, December 11, 1942
Box 4 12 Program, African American WAAC officers first graduation class banquet, Hotel Fort DesMoines, 1942
Box 4 13 Ribbon, red white & blue with starts, undated
Box 4 14 Book, New Testament [and] Psalms, “To Capt. Mildred Osby from Chaplain James C. Grady, Ft. Sam Houston, 1 May 1945”
Box 4 15 Book, My War: W.W.II As Experienced by One Woman Soldier, by Catherine (Bell) Chrisman, Maverick Publications by Northland Press, 1989. Autographed “to Irma”
Box 4 16 Scrapbook front cover, eagle with “Fort Huachuca WAAC,” inside photo of WAAC quarters at Fort Huachuca, undated
Box 4 17 Scrapbook front cover, great seal of the United States with eagle, undated

Series 3: Correspondence – General (Oversize)

4 18 Correspondence, original copies, Horace R. Cayton (copy in Box 1, folder 10) and Robert Klein (copy in Box 1, folder 14). Originals attached to scrapbook page material and to each other.
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