Charles A. Hayes Papers

Charles A. Hayes Papers, 1944-1997
Dates: 1944-1997
Size: 10 linear feet (10 archival boxes)
Repository: Chicago Public Library, Carter G. Woodson Regional Library, Vivian G. Harsh Research Collection of Afro-American History and Literature, 9525 S. Halsted St., Chicago, IL 60628
Collection Number: 2010/07
Provenance: Donated by Charlene Smith, daughter of Charles A. Hayes, in July 2010. These papers constitute what remained after a basement flood destroyed much of Hayes’ papers that remained in Mrs. Smith’s home.
Access: No restrictions
Citation: When quoting material from this collection, the preferred citation is: Charles A. Hayes Papers [Box #, Folder #], Vivian G. Harsh Research Collection of Afro-American History and Literature, Chicago Public Library.
Processed by: Mapping the Stacks Staff, Melissa Barton, Doron Galili, Moira HInderer, Celeste Day Moore, Traci Parker, Christina Petersen, Marcia Walker.
Supervised by: Michael Flug, Senior Archivist, Vivian G. Harsh Research Collection of Afro-American History and Literature, CPL.

Biographical Note

Charles A. Hayes, 1918-1997

The first trade union leader to be elected to Congress, Charles Arthur Hayes was a longtime labor leader and civil rights activist. Charles A. Hayes was born to Charles Martin Hayes, a farm laborer, and Nevada Irvin, a housewife, in Cairo, Ill., on February 17, 1918. Hayes was the second of 12 children and the first son.

Hayes graduated from Cairo’s all-black Sumner High School in 1935. After high school, Hayes found work with the Civilian Conservation Corps planting trees along the Mississippi River near Cairo and also worked for a short time repairing tracks of the old Missouri & Pacific Railroad line. Shortly thereafter, in 1938, he began working as a machine operator in Cairo for E.L. Bruce Hardwood Flooring Co. He and his fellow laborers founded a local union, Local 1424 of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, to help secure bargaining rights and better wages, and to protest racist hiring and pay practices. He served as the first president of the local, from 1940 to 1942. During this time he met and married his first wife, Emma King. The couple would eventually have two children, Barbara Jean and Charlene Leslie.

In 1942, Hayes and his family left for Chicago, where he found employment with the help of an uncle at a Wilson & Co. meatpacking plant. Hayes became involved with the newly chartered United Packinghouse Workers of America (UPWA) in 1943, working with its grievance committee. In 1944 Hayes led a protracted struggle to achieve recognition of UPWA-CIO Local 25 to bargain on behalf of 3,500 Wilson workers. Ultimately successful, Hayes helped to lead workers, especially minority and women workers, on a campaign to end segregated facilities and discriminatory practices in hiring and promotion in the plant. In 1949 he became a UPWA field representative and in 1954 became district director of UPWA’s District One, which encompassed some 35,000 workers, the majority of whom were in Illinois.

As a leader in the UPWA and District One director, Hayes recruited and mentored more minority and women leaders, including labor leader and women’s rights and civil rights activist the Rev. Addie Wyatt, who worked under Hayes as a field representative and program coordinator. With the leadership of Hayes, Wyatt and others in the UPWA, the union played a role in supporting the integration of public housing, open housing and increased and better employment, as well as health care and civil and political rights in the city of Chicago. District One’s headquarters moved from a location near the meatpacking plants and Back of the Yards neighborhood to a building at 49th Street and Wabash Avenue, formerly Bacon’s Casino, in 1949. The controversial move would accommodate the growing numbers of black union members who resided on the South Side. A new building at the site was constructed by the UPWA in 1957 and dedicated as the District One Headquarters in 1958.

During this time, Hayes led the district’s efforts to raise funds for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s voter registration drive in the South and other Southern civil rights activities and cultivated a professional and personal relationship with King. Hayes worked closely with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference during the 1960s, and the UPWA would for the most part, continue to be a supporter of the Southern civil rights movement. In 1968, the UPWA merged with the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America (AMCBW), taking the name of the latter. Hayes was promoted to the position of international vice president and remained a district director of District 12, which comprised his former district and was expanded to include Indiana and Michigan.

Throughout the 1970s and the early 1980s, Hayes would play a role in major civil rights, labor-based and black political organizations. Hayes was a founding member of Operation PUSH (People United to Save Humanity) and a board member of the Chicago Urban League. In 1972, Hayes was a founding member of the Coalition of Black Trade Unionists (CBTU) and its first executive vice president until 1986. Formed in opposition to the AFL-CIO’s neutral stance in the 1972 presidential election, the CBTU sought to provide a political voice for blacks in the labor movement and sought to improve the conditions and leadership voice of blacks within the labor movement. In Chicago, Hayes supported political candidates outside of the Chicago political machine, such as Harold Washington, and was a founding member of the Committee for a Black Mayor of the City of Chicago. Hayes and Washington became close friends, and Hayes supported Washington’s unsuccessful campaign for mayor in 1977.

Hayes suffered a series of personal setbacks in the 1970s. In 1973, his first wife, Emma died. He remarried two years later in 1975 to Ethel Cooper, who died four years later in 1979. That same year, Hayes’ labor union, the AMCBW, underwent yet another merger, this time merging with the Retail Clerks International Union to form the 1.5 million member union, the United Food and Commercial Workers. Hayes maintained his post as an international vice president.

In 1983, U.S. Rep. Harold Washington made a successful run for mayor of Chicago, leaving vacant his 1st Congressional District seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. An eloquent speaker,a skillful organizer and well-known in the district, Hayes entered the congressional race with the support of Mayor Washington and organized labor. In his first-ever election for public office, Charles Hayes ran as a Democrat against 13 other candidates in the primary including Ralph Metcalfe, Jr., civil rights leader Al Raby and newspaper columnist and community activist Lu Palmer. Hayes won the primary election with 45 percent of the vote. He would go on to defeat his Republican opponent, Diane Preacely, with 94 percent of the vote in the special election August 23, 1993. Hayes was sworn in to the 90th Congress on September 12, 1983 at age 65.

As a representative, Hayes served on the Committee on Education and Labor and the Small Business Committee. He was also a member of the House Committee on Post Office and Civil Service. Hayes was a member of the Congressional Black Caucus and, along with other demonstrators, protested outside the South African embassy in Washington, D.C. against South African apartheid and was one of the first representatives to be arrested in the protest. Hayes’ congressional service was marked by his tireless efforts on behalf of labor and education. He introduced the Dropout Prevention and Reentry Act to encourage teenagers not to drop out of high school and to provide them with job training and support services. The legislation successfully secured $500 million from the federal government allocated to state and local government officials to address the problem. Hayes also sponsored unemployment reduction bills and public works programs, and he urged Congress to strengthen the 1978 Humphrey-Hawkins Full Employment and Balanced Growth Act.

Hayes was subsequently re-elected for four terms, usually winning more than 90 percent of the vote. In 1992 he was narrowly defeated by Bobby Rush, a Chicago City Council member and former Black Panther. Hayes’ tenure in office ended on January 3, 1993. Charles Hayes passed away from complications of lung cancer on April 8, 1997. Twice widowed and once divorced, Hayes had four children and a host of grandchildren. He was a member and a deacon of Antioch Missionary Baptist Church in Chicago. The Charles A. Hayes Post Office on the South Side of Chicago opened under his name in 1996. The Charles A. Hayes Family Investment Center, a nonprofit technology center for disadvantaged Chicago residents, opened in the former UPWA headquarters building in 1999.

Sources

  • “Charles Arthur Hayes.” Black Americans in Congress, 1870-2007 .U.S. House of Representatives. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2008. 546-549.
  • Clay, William L. Just Permanent Interests: Black Americans in Congress, 1870-1991. New York: Amistad Press, 1992.
  • Halpern, Rick and Roger Horowitz. Meatpackers: An Oral History of Black Packinghouse Workers and Their Struggle for Racial and Economic Equality . New York: Monthly Review Press, 1999.
  • “Hayes, Charles Arthur.” The African American Encyclopedia . Ed. Michael W. Williams. Vol. 3. New York: Marshall Cavendish, 1993. 733.
  • Hoskins, James. “Charles Arthur Hayes.” Distinguished African AmericanPolitical and Governmental Leaders . Oryx Press, 1999. 123-125.

Scope and Content Note

This collection has been arranged into three super series: pre-congressional records, congressional records and photographs. The first super series documents aspects of Hayes’ life prior to his congressional campaign and service as a congressman beginning in 1983. The second super series documents Hayes’ run for congressional office in 1983 and his congressional service from 1983 to 1993, and also includes a small amount of materials from his life after his congressional service from 1993 to his death in 1997. The third super series contains over 100 photographs that document aspects of Hayes’ personal life, labor organizing, and congressional campaign and service. Related collections at the Vivian G. Harsh Research Collection include: the Rev. Addie Wyatt and Rev. Claude Wyatt Papers, the Timuel Black Papers and the Coalition of Black Trade Unionists–Chicago Chapter archives.

Super Series 1: Pre-Congressional Records, 1944-1983
This super series includes biography and family records, early manuscripts authored by Hayes and others including manuscripts on the need for the election of a black mayor of the city of Chicago, organization records, serials and pamphlets, clippings and memorabilia. Included in the organization records are materials from the United Packinghouse, Food and Allied Workers of America (UPWA), the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America (AMCBW) and the United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW). Of note are several volumes from the 1960s of the District One Champion, the newspaper of UPWA’s District One, which Hayes directed. Also included in the organization files are records of Hayes’ other organizational affiliations and memberships, including materials from Mayor Harold Washington’s Transition Committee in 1982-1983.

Super Series 2: Congressional Records, 1983-1997
This super series has been subdivided into several series, including congressional campaign, congressional service and post-congressional records. The congressional campaign materials include correspondence, Hayes for Congress committee operational and organizational outlines, and letters of support and concern written to Hayes from citizens and voters. The congressional service records include biographical statements as well as some of Hayes’ statements and addresses on labor and employment legislation as a congressman. These records also include correspondence and Hayes’ congressional financial contributions in the late 1980s and early 1990s, as well as programs, serials, clippings and memorabilia. A small amount of materials document Hayes’ life after Congress from 1993 to 1997, including the dedication of a United States Post Office location in his name. This series also includes audiovisual materials, primarily videotapes featuring Hayes as a congressman.

Super Series 3: Photographs
The majority of the photographs in this collection document Hayes’ life as a congressman and capture his committee work, service and membership in the Congressional Black Caucus. Also included are photos from Hayes’ congressional campaign in Chicago. A small number of photographs date back to the 1950s and feature members and activities of the UPWA.

Container List

Charles A. Hayes, Predominant dates, 1960-1993, Inclusive dates, 1944-1997

Super Series 1: Pre-Congressional Materials
Series 1: Biography and Family Records
Box 1 Folder 1 Charles Hayes, Warranty Deed for home, 1975, 1990
Box 1 Folder 2 Charles Hayes, Birth Certificate, 1976
Box 1 Folder 3 Charles Hayes, Passport Application, 1976
Box 1 Folder 4 Charles Hayes, Funeral Program, 1997
Box 1 Folder 5 Charles Hayes, Death clippings, 1997
Box 1 Folder 6 Ethel Hayes, Passport Application, 1976
Series 2: Manuscripts
Box 1 Folder 7 Hayes, Charles, Speech at The American Negro Emancipation Centennial (Chicago) 1963
Box 1 Folder 8 Hayes, Charles, Speech on the History of Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workman of North America (AMCBW) and Civil Rights before an unknown AMCBW District, c. early 1970s
Box 1 Folder 9 Hayes, Charles, Press Statement of Charles Hayes on the need for a Black Mayor in Chicago, 1974
Box 1 Folder 10 Hayes, Charles, Statement of Charles Hayes, Chairman of the Committee for a Black Mayor (Chicago) 1974
Box 1 Folder 11 Hayes, Charles, Press Statement of the Political Action Conference of Illinois (Chicago) 1981
Box 1 Folder 12 Other Authors, Robeson, Paul, Forge Negro-Labor Unity for Peace and Jobs, National Labor Conference for Negro Rights (Chicago) 1950
Box 1 Folder 13 Other Authors, Washington, Harold, Statement to Committee for a Black Mayor (Chicago) 1974
Box 1 Folder 14 Unknown Author, Mural Ideas for Packinghouse [n.d.]
Series 3: Organization Files
Box 1 Folder 15 United Packinghouse, Food and Allied Workers of America (UPWA), District One Champion, November 1960
Box 1 Folder 16 UPWA, District One Champion, July 1961
Box 1 Folder 17 UPWA, District One Champion, November 1961
Box 1 Folder 18 UPWA, District One Champion, January 1962
Box 1 Folder 19 UPWA, District One Champion, August 1962
Box 1 Folder 20 UPWA, District One Champion, March 1963
Box 1 Folder 21 UPWA, District One Champion, August 1963
Box 1 Folder 22 UPWA, District One Champion, November 1963
Box 1 Folder 23 UPWA, District One Champion, March 1964
Box 1 Folder 24 UPWA, District One Champion, October 1964
Box 1 Folder 25 UPWA, District One Champion, February 1965
Box 1 Folder 26 UPWA, District One Champion, February 1966
Box 1 Folder 27 UPWA, International Constitution, 1960
Box 1 Folder 28 UPWA, Officer’s Reports, District One Council Conventions, 1962-1963, 1966
Box 1 Folder 29 Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America (AMCBW), Agreements, 1974
Box 1 Folder 30 AMCBW, The Butcher Workman, 1971, 1976, 1979
Box 1 Folder 31 AMCBW, Correspondence, 1972-1979
Box 1 Folder 32 AMCBW, International Constitution, 1976
Box 1 Folder 33 AMCBW, Press Release, c. 1970s
Box 1 Folder 34 AMCBW, Programs, 1974-1976
Box 1 Folder 35 United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW), 1979-1980, 1983
Box 1 Folder 36 AFL-CIO, 1966, 1979
Box 1 Folder 37 Charles A. Hayes Labor and Community Center, c. 1981
Box 1 Folder 38 Committee for a Black Mayor, 1974
Box 1 Folder 39 Harold Washington for Mayor Committee, 1982-1983
Box 1 Folder 40 Joint Center for Political Studies, 1983
Box 1 Folder 41 Sojourner Foundation, 1975
Box 2 Folder 1 Mayor Harold Washington’s Transition Committee, 1983 (1)
Box 2 Folder 2 Mayor Harold Washington’s Transition Committee, 1983 (2)
Box 2 Folder 3 Mayor Harold Washington’s Transition Committee, 1983 (3)
Series 4: Serials and Pamphlets
Box 2 Folder 4 Labor’s World—Canadian Labor Congress, c. 1980
Box 2 Folder 5 On the Job in Illinois—Then and Now, 1976
Box 2 Folder 6 Romans—the Gospel for All, 1962
Box 2 Folder 7 Studies in Christian Theology [n.d.]
Box 2 Folder 8 The Times Herald (Washington, D.C.) June 4, 1944
Series 5: Clippings
Box 2 Folder 9 Clippings, 1975-1978
Series 6: Memorabilia
Box 3 Folder 1 Mounted clipping of Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper on Chicago Meatpacking, 1878; Chicago Branch NAACP Certificate of Merit, 1960; AMCBW Briefcase, c. 1968-1979
Super Series 2: Congressional Era Materials, 1983-1993
Series 1: Congressional Campaign
Box 4 Folder 1 Congressional Campaign, May 1983
Box 4 Folder 2 Congressional Campaign, June 1-15, 1983
Box 4 Folder 3 Congressional Campaign, June 16-30, 1983
Box 4 Folder 4 Congressional Campaign, July 1983
Box 4 Folder 5 Congressional Campaign, May-July 1983 (1)
Box 4 Folder 6 Congressional Campaign, May-July 1983 (2)
Box 4 Folder 7 Congressional Campaign, May-July 1983 (3)
Series 2: Congressional Service
Box 4 Folder 8 Biographical Statements, c. 1992
Box 4 Folder 9 Manuscripts, Hayes, Charles, “The Hayes Papers,” c. 1984-1987
Box 4 Folder 10 Manuscripts, Hayes, Charles, “Solutions to the Dilemma Faced by Women and Minority Participation in the 10% set-Aside Program,” 1989
Box 4 Folder 11 Manuscripts, Hayes, Charles, “A Position Paper on the 1992 Chicago’s World Fair,” c. late 1980s
Box 4 Folder 12 Manuscripts, Hayes, Charles, Statement before the U.S. House of Representatives in Support of The Dellums/Waters Amendment to HR 5006, 1992
Box 4 Folder 13 Correspondence, 1983-1985, 1987-1992
Box 5 Folder 1 Financial Contributions, 1983-1984, 1987, 1989
Box 5 Folder 2 Financial Contributions, 1990
Box 5 Folder 3 Financial Contributions, May-August 1991
Box 5 Folder 4 Financial Contributions, September-December 1991
Box 5 Folder 5 Congressional Black Caucus, 1987-1988, 1990
Box 5 Folder 6 Programs, 1983-1984
Box 5 Folder 7 Programs, 1989-1992
Box 5 Folder 8 Re-election Materials, c. 1992
Box 5 Folder 9 Serials, Congressman Charles Hayes Reports from Washington, September 1987
Box 5 Folder 10 Serials, Dollars and Sense, February/March 1987
Box 5 Folder 11 Serials, Roll Call-The Newspaper of Capitol Hill, September 15, 1983
Box 5 Folder 12 Clippings, Black Politicians, 1988, 1992
Box 5 Folder 13 Clippings, Charles Hayes, 1983-1992
Box 5 Folder 14 Post-Congressional Material, 1993-1997
Box 6 AV 001 1st District Congressional Awards (Chicago) 1984 [videocassette]
Box 6 AV 002 1st District Congressional Awards (Chicago) 1985 [beta tape]
Box 6 AV 003 African National Congress—A Time for Candor, 1987 [videocassette]
Box 6 AV 004 The Congress—Ken Burns, 1989 [videocassette]
Box 6 AV 005 A New Way to Share in Chicago’s Future—Continental Bank Corporation, 1989 [videocassette]
Box 6 AV 006 ABC New Nightline on Apartheid, 1990 [videocassette]
Box 6 AV 007 American-Arab Antidiscrimination Committee National Convention, How to Lobby Your Congressman, 1990 [videocassette]
Box 6 AV 008 CNN’s Profiles in Congress on Rep. Charles Hayes, 1988 [videocassette] and C-SPAN, Rep. Charles Hayes Viewer Call-In Program, 1990 [videocassette]
Box 7 AV 009 Joint Meeting of Congress, Nelson Mandela visit, 1990 [videocassette]
Box 7 AV 010 Congressional Black Caucus Foundation (CBCF) 20th Annual Legislative Weekend Prayer Breakfast, 1990 [videocassette]
Box 7 AV 011 CBCF 20th Annual Legislative Weekend Annual Awards Dinner, 1990 [videocassette]
Box 7 AV 012 CBCF Multimedia Presentations, 1990 [videocassette]
Box 7 AV 013 “Oh, What a Time” Black Life During WWII, Roger House, 1996 [audiocassette]
Box 8 Folder 1 Independent Voters of Illinois-Independent Precinct Organization (IVI-IPO) Award, 1992; Coalition of Black Trade Unionists 1988 Convention Bag
Super Series 3: Photographs
Box 9 Photo 001 Rep. Charles Hayes Congressional Portrait, c. early 1990s
Box 9 Photo 002 Rep. Charles Hayes, Rep. Mervyn Dymally, Rep. Cardiss Collins, c. 1983-1993
Box 9 Photo 003 Rep. Charles Hayes, Rep. Mervyn Dymally, Rep. Cardiss Collins, c. 1983-1993
Box 9 Photo 004 Jesse Jackson and Charles Hayes, c. 1980s
Box 9 Photo 005 Rep. Charles Hayes Portrait, c. 1990s
Box 9 Photo 006 Eugene Sawyer, Unknown, Rep. Charles Hayes, John Sengstacke, c. 1990s
Box 9 Photo 007 Rep. Charles Hayes, Unknown, Jesse Jackson, Gus Savage, c. late 1980s
Box 9 Photo 008 Rep. Charles Hayes meeting with Senior Citizens, Yale House, c. late 1980s, early 1990s
Box 9 Photo 009 Rep. Charles Hayes, CBC Scholarship Breakfast, 1988
Box 9 Photo 010 Rep. Charles Hayes, Rossi Banks, 1988
Box 9 Photo 011 Rep. Charles Hayes and choir, 1st Congressional District Annual Family Day Picnic, c. early 1990s
Box 9 Photo 012 Charles Hayes and young men, Operation PUSH, 1983
Box 9 Photo 013 Charles Hayes and young men, Operation PUSH, 1983
Box 9 Photo 014 Robert Patronella and Charles Hayes at AMCBW New England Council’s Business Agent’s Meeting, 1978
Box 9 Photo 015 Robert Patronella and Charles Hayes at AMCBW New England Council’s Business Agent’s Meeting, 1978
Box 9 Photo 016 Charles Hayes for Congress Labor March, 1983
Box 9 Photo 017 Rep. Charles Hayes and Rep. Katie Hall MLK Birthday Radio Broadcast, 1983
Box 9 Photo 018 Rep. Charles Hayes and Yvonne Dye, Congressional Page, 1984
Box 9 Photo 019 Rep. Charles Hayes and Ken Godawa, Congressional Page, 1984
Box 9 Photo 020 Rep. Charles Hayes, Margo Dunlap Dawson and Howard Woodson, 1984
Box 9 Photo 021 Rep. Charles Hayes Portrait, c. 1980s
Box 9 Photo 022 Rep. Charles Hayes Congressional Portrait, c. 1980s
Box 9 Photo 023 Rep. Charles Hayes and Carol Channing, c. 1980s
Box 9 Photo 024 State Senator Richard Newhouse and Rep. Charles Hayes, c. 1980s
Box 9 Photo 025 Rep. Charles Hayes and Robert Starks, c. late 1980s
Box 9 Photo 026 Rep. Charles Hayes and Robert Starks, c. late 1980s
Box 9 Photo 027 Rev. Willie Barrow and Rev. Addie Wyatt, c. late 1980s
Box 9 Photo 028 Rep. Charles Hayes, CBTU Awards Ceremony, 1991
Box 9 Photo 029 Rep. Charles Hayes, CBTU Awards Ceremony, 1991
Box 9 Photo 030 Rep. Charles Hayes, c. 1980s
Box 9 Photo 031 Dr. Jawanza Kunjufu and Rep. Charles Hayes, 1989
Box 9 Photo 032 Rep. Charles Hayes, c. late 1980s, early 1990s
Box 9 Photo 033 Charles Hayes for Congress Labor March, (Chicago, IL) 1983
Box 9 Photo 034 Health and Hospitals Governing Commission of Cook County Plaque, 1978
Box 9 Photo 035 UPWA Old Age Pensioners at Banquet Local #34, 1954
Box 9 Photo 036 UPWA Local #26 (Hammond, IN) Executive Board at Bacon’s Casino, 1956
Box 9 Photo 037 UPWA Children’s Party at Bacon’s Casino, 1954
Box 9 Photo 038 Charles Hayes at a UPWA demonstration against Brennan Packing Co., (Chicago) c. late 1950s, 1960s
Box 9 Photo 039 Addie Wyatt and Charles Hayes at UPWA Demonstration against Brennan Packing Co. (Chicago) c. late 1950s, 1960s
Box 9 Photo 040 Processional outside of UPWA District 1 headquarters (Chicago) c. 1958-1968
Box 9 Photo 041 Children’s Celebration, c. 1950s/1960s
Box 9 Photo 042 Rep. Charles Hayes Barbecue, c. 1980s
Box 9 Photo 043 Children for Charles Hayes (Chicago) 1983
Box 9 Photo 044 Charles Hayes for Congress Flyers (Chicago) 1983
Box 9 Photo 045 Charles Hayes trip to Yugoslavia, c. late 1980s, early 1990s
Box 9 Photo 046 Charles Hayes trip to Yugoslavia, c. late 1980s, early 1990s
Box 9 Photo 047 Charles Hayes trip to Yugoslavia, c. late 1980s, early 1990s
Box 9 Photo 048 Charles Hayes trip to Yugoslavia, c. late 1980s, early 1990s
Box 9 Photo 049 Charles Hayes meeting with local union members, c. 1970s
Box 9 Photo 050 Congressional Black Caucus event, Charles Hayes and Maxine Waters, c. 1993
Box 9 Photo 051 Congressional Black Caucus event, Charles Hayes and Maxine Waters, c. 1993
Box 9 Photo 052 Congressional Black Caucus event, Charles Hayes, c. 1993
Box 9 Photo 053 Rep. Charles Hayes, c. 1980s
Box 9 Photo 054 Rep. Charles Hayes addressing schoolchildren, c. late 1980s, early 1990s
Box 9 Photo 055 House of Representatives Small Business Committee, Parren Mitchell, Chairing, c. 1980s
Box 9 Photo 056 Rep. Charles Hayes greeting two unidentified women, c. 1980s
Box 9 Photo 057 Rep. Charles Hayes and Rep. John Conyers, c. 1980s
Box 9 Photo 058 Rep. Charles Hayes greeting an unidentified man, c. 1980s
Box 9 Photo 059 Charles Hayes, Labor meeting(?), c. 1970s
Box 9 Photo 060 Congressional Birthday Celebration for Rep. Claude Pepper, c. 1980s
Box 9 Photo 061 Rep. Charles Hayes shaking hands with House Speaker Tip O’Neill, c. 1980s
Box 9 Photo 062 Rep. Charles Hayes and unidentified men at his congressional office, c. 1983-1993
Box 9 Photo 063 Rep. Charles Hayes, Unidentified, Rep. Mervyn Dymally, c. 1983-1993
Box 9 Photo 064 Rep. Charles Hayes on Capitol Hill(?), c. early 1990s
Box 9 Photo 065 Rep. Walter Fauntroy and Rep. Charles Hayes, c. 1983-1991
Box 9 Photo 066 Siaka Stevens, President of Sierra Leone, Rep. Mervyn Dymally, Rep. Charles Rangel and Rep. Charles Hayes, c. 1983-1993
Box 9 Photo 067 Rep. Ron Dellums and Rep. Charles Hayes Radio Broadcast, c. 1983-1993
Box 9 Photo 068 Rep. Charles Hayes and Rep. Augustus Hawkins Radio Broadcast, c. 1983-1993
Box 9 Photo 069 Rep. Charles Hayes and Rep. Augustus Hawkins and other congressman at congressional celebration, c. 1983-1993
Box 9 Photo 070 Rep. Charles Hayes, Rep. Nancy Pelosi and congressional committee members, c. 1987-1993
Box 9 Photo 071 Rep. Edolphus Towns, unidentified and Rep. Charles Hayes, c. 1983-1993
Box 9 Photo 072 Rep. Charles Hayes, Rep. Edolphus Towns, Rep. Major Owens, Rep. Charles Rangel, unidentified, Rep. Alton Waldon, Jr., and Rep. Alan Wheat, c. 1986-1987
Box 9 Photo 073 Rep. Charles Hayes and his congressional and campaign staff, c. 1983
Box 9 Photo 074 Dorothy Tillman, Rep. Charles Hayes and others, c. 1985-1993
Box 9 Photo 075 Rep. Charles Hayes and Tanzanian man, c. 1980s
Box 10 Photo 076 Rep. Charles Hayes and United Parcel Service Workers (Chicago), c. 1983-1993
Box 10 Photo 077 Rep. Charles Hayes and women’s group, c. late 1980s, early 1990s
Box 10 Photo 078 Rep. Charles Hayes and others, c. late 1980s, early 1990s
Box 10 Photo 079 John Stroger, Rep. Charles Hayes and others, 1992
Box 10 Photo 080 Rep. Charles Hayes and unidentified, 1992
Box 10 Photo 081 John Stroger, Rep. Charles Hayes and others, 1992
Box 10 Photo 082 Charles Hayes campaigning at Picnic (Chicago), 1983
Box 10 Photo 083 Charles Hayes campaigning at Picnic (Chicago), 1983
Box 10 Photo 084 Charles Hayes campaigning at Picnic (Chicago), 1983
Box 10 Photo 085 Charles Hayes campaigning at Picnic (Chicago), 1983
Box 10 Photo 086 Charles Hayes campaigning at Picnic (Chicago), 1983
Box 10 Photo 087 Rep. Charles Hayes speaking in Seattle, c. 1980s
Box 10 Photo 088 Rep. Charles Hayes and others, c. early 1980s
Box 10 Photo 089 Rep. Charles Hayes and unidentified man (Chicago), 1983
Box 10 Photo 090 Rep. Charles Hayes, Jesse Jackson, Ralph Metcalfe on Dias at Rally, c. late 1960s, early 1970s
Box 10 Photo 091 Rep. Charles Hayes and unidentified man, c. 1980s
Box 10 Photo 092 Rep. Charles Hayes at Women’s Dinner, c. 1980s
Box 10 Photo 093 Rep. Charles Hayes at Women’s Dinner, c. 1980s
Box 10 Photo 094 Rep. Charles Hayes receiving Foster Grandparent Program Award, 1991
Box 10 Photo 095 Rep. Charles Hayes and unidentified man, 1984
Box 10 Photo 096 Charles Hayes and family members, Family Reunion (Gary, IN) 1983
Box 10 Photo 097 Charles Hayes at labor event(?), c. 1980s
Box 10 Photo 098 Charles Hayes at labor event(?), c. 1980s
Box 10 Photo 099 Unidentified woman, c. 1980s
Box 10 Photo 100 Rep. Charles Hayes and group of African women, 1984
Box 10 Photo 101 Rep. Charles Hayes and congressional visitors, c. 1983-1993
Box 10 Photo 102 Rep. Charles Hayes and congressional visitors, c. 1983-1993
Box 10 Photo 103 Rep. Charles Hayes and congressional visitors, c. 1983-1993
Box 10 Photo 104 Rep. Charles Hayes and congressional visitor, c. 1983-1993
Box 10 Photo 105 Rep. Charles Hayes and congressional visitor, c. 1983-1993
Box 10 Photo 106 Rep. Charles Hayes and congressional visitor, c. 1983-1993
Box 10 Photo 107 Rep. Charles Hayes and congressional visitor, c. 1983-1993
Box 10 Photo 108 Rep. Charles Hayes and congressional visitor, c. 1983-1993
Box 10 Photo 109 Rep. Charles Hayes and congressional visitor, c. 1983-1993
Box 10 Photo 110 Rep. Charles Hayes and congressional visitors, c. 1983-1993
Box 10 Photo 111 Rep. Charles Hayes and congressional visitor, c. 1983-1993
Box 10 Photo 112 Rep. Charles Hayes and congressional visitor, c. 1983-1993
Box 10 Photo 113 Rep. Charles Hayes and congressional visitors, c. 1983-1993
Box 10 Photo 114 Rep. Charles Hayes and congressional visitor, c. 1983-1993
Box 10 Photo 115 Rep. Charles Hayes and congressional visitor, c. 1983-1993
Box 10 Photo 116 Corporate/Community Schools of America Children, 1989
Print