American Civil War Documents, Manuscripts, Letters and Diaries and Grand Army of the Republic Collections

Dates: 1785-1957, bulk 1860-1866
Size: 10 linear feet, 6 oversize folders
Repository: Chicago Public Library, Harold Washington Library Center, Special Collections, 400 S. State St., Chicago, IL 60605
Collection Number: Multiple accession numbers
Provenance: These materials are gathered together because they are all related to the American Civil War. They were acquired through a variety of means over the years. Those items with accession numbers beginning with “72” were originally part of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) Collection. The items with accession numbers beginning with a number other than “72” were either donated to or purchased by Chicago Public Library.
Access: No restrictions
Citation: When quoting material from this collection, please contact Special Collections for the preferred citation.
Processed by: Johanna Russ, February 2015, February 2018

Historical Note

Near the end of 1860, South Carolina became the first state to secede from the Union. Within a few months, ten more states had seceded. The American Civil War officially began April 12, 1861, at Fort Sumter in Charleston, South Carolina. Illinois participated on the Union side by sending hundreds of thousands of troops into battle. Many military and political leaders trace their roots to Illinois. The war lasted nearly four years, ending on April 9, 1865, when the Confederacy surrendered. A few days later, on April 14, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated.

Not long after the war ended, veterans began forming organizations. One of the longest-lasting was the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR), begun in April 1866 in Decatur, Illinois. Posts were established in different places, grouped under state-level departments, in turn grouped under a national commandery-in-chief. The GAR disbanded in 1956 when the last veteran died.

In Chicago, the GAR Memorial Hall Association shared space with Chicago Public Library (CPL). In 1883, the Library Board chose the corner of Michigan Avenue and Randolph Street as the location for its future building. At the time, the site was vacant and known as Dearborn Park, named for its proximity to the site of Fort Dearborn. Because of this, many people believed the land was reserved for the GAR. Ultimately, legal action determined the library could have the land, but it had to make room for the GAR, which wanted a memorial hall for its members. CPL gave the GAR extensive rooms and signed a fifty year lease that expired in 1947. At that time, the Library took over caring for the GAR's significant collection of art, artifacts, papers, weapons and more. With the GAR’s material as a base, the library has continued to build its Civil War collection over the years, with a focus on the Illinois experience.

Scope and Content

Material in this collection predominantly relates to the American Civil War—its battles, rank and file soldiers, leaders and veterans. A large portion of this material focuses on the experience of soldiers and leaders from Illinois. Included are letters and diaries that capture not only important information about troop movements, battle strategies and leaders’ decisions, but also the often difficult and mundane life of the rank and file soldier marching great distances, waiting for something to happen and missing life back home.

Other major topics in this collection include slavery throughout the world in the centuries leading up to the Civil War; Abraham Lincoln; and the veterans group, the Grand Army of the Republic, especially its Illinois Departments. These subjects are documented through official papers and publications. Further documentation of the Civil War appears in ephemera, songs and poems, patriotic envelopes and currency.

Related Materials

American Civil War Photographs and Images and Grand Army of the Republic Photographs and Images

Arrangement and Series Description

Items have been arranged into two parts: Part 1: Letters and Diaries and Part 2: Documents and other Materials. Within Part 1, many letters and diaries were acquired as sets because of a central, common author or recipient. Thus, Part 1 is organized alphabetically by last name of the common author or recipient. Sometimes items that are neither letters nor diaries are included because they relate to the same individual and were acquired as part of the sets. Occasionally, items related to the same individuals were acquired not as part of the same set. Those have been included with the individual.

Letters and diaries that are not part of a larger set have been grouped under “Series 29: General Letters” and “Series 30: General Diaries, Narrative Accounts and Minute Books.” Items within Series 29 and 30 have been organized alphabetically by author’s last name. Items within the other series in Part 1 have been organized chronologically.

A listing of authors and correspondents arranged by regiment follows the item list, at the end of the finding aid.

Part 2 has been organized into series by format or subject. The series are listed alphabetically. Within most series, items are listed chronologically.

Brief series summary

Part 1: Letters and Diaries

Series 1 Henry Backus, 14th Illinois Infantry, Company D, 1861-1864 – 7 diaries
Series 2 Marshall Chase, 63rd Illinois Infantry, Company A, 1864-1865, 1912, 1919, undated – 4 items, including 1 diary and 1 personal history
Series 3 George P. Cumming, 102nd Illinois Infantry, Company H, 1862-1864, undated – 15 letters
Series 4 James M. Doig, 17th New York Infantry, 1861-1863 – 3 letters
Series 5 Frank W. Fuller, 74th Illinois Infantry, Company I, 1862-1865 – 23 letters; 7 diaries; 2 account books
Series 6 Ulysses S. Grant, General and United States President, 1861-1880, undated – 14 Letters, 2 additional items
Series 7 Rosell M. Hough, 9th Illinois Cavalry, 1861-1882 – 12 items, including letters and official orders
Series 8 William T. Humphrey, 101st Illinois Infantry, 1863-1865, undated – 10 items, including 1 diary and 4 letters
Series 9 Nathaniel Colver Kenyon, 11th Illinois Infantry, 1862-1865 – 2 diaries
Series 10 Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon, 36th Illinois Infantry, Company B, 1862-1863 – 12 letters
Series 11 Geza Mihalotzy, 24th Illinois Infantry, 1861-1864, undated – 31 items, including letters, official orders and other documents
Series 12 David W. Morris, 126th Illinois Infantry, Company H, 1862-1867 – 36 letters, 1 diary
Series 13 Annie F. Noble (Otis M. Moody, 51st Illinois Infantry, Headquarters detachment), 1852-1905, undated – 30 letters, 16 from Moody
Series 14 E.N. Palley, Army of the Potomac, 1862-1863 – 4 letters
Series 15 R.D. Parker, Civilian, 1896-1901 – 31 letters
Series 16 Fitz-John Porter, General, 1869-1951 – 4 letters, 1 report
Series 17 John W. Potter, 35th Indiana Infantry, Company B, 1865 – 17 letters
Series 18 Richard Realf, 88th Illinois Infantry, 1861-1864, undated – 12 items, including letters and poems
Series 19 William Starke Rosecrans, General, 1862-1863, 1907 – 4 letters
Series 20 Philip Henry Sheridan, General, 1872-1879, undated – 2 letters, 1 autograph
Series 21 William T. Sherman, General, 1863-1874 – 6 letters, 1 autograph
Series 22 John Corson Smith, 96th Illinois Infantry, 1862-1865 – 4 diaries
Series 23 John B. Spiller, 31st Illinois Infantry, Company C, 1862-1863 – 9 letters
Series 24 David S. Stanley, General, 1862-1864 – 3 items
Series 25 Jonathan Stewart, 74th Illinois Infantry, Company I, 1863-1865 – 2 diaries
Series 26 Flora Weaver, 1862-1865, undated – 12 letters
Series 27 James M. Welch, 16th Illinois Infantry, Company D, 1862-1865 – 2 diaries
Series 28 William R. Wilder, 9th Illinois Cavalry, Company F, 1862-1865 – 21 letters
Series 29 General Letters, 1847-1924, undated, bulk 1861-1865 – 43 letters
Series 30 General Diaries, Narrative Accounts and Minute Books, 1860-1886 – 13 diaries

Part 2: Documents and Other Material

Series 1 Currency, 1856-1864, undated – 100 items
Series 2 Elections, 1862-1877 – 11 items
Series 3 Patriotic Envelopes, 1861-1865, undated – 27 items
Series 4 Ephemera, 1861-1911, undated – 44 items
Series 5 Grand Army of the Republic:
Subseries A: Grand Army of the Republic and other Civil War Veterans Groups, 1866-1957, undated – 46 items
Subseries B: Grand Army of the Republic Enlistment Forms, 1866 – 80 items
Series 6 Abraham Lincoln, 1841-2005, undated – 31 items
Series 7 Publications, Forms, Certificates, Official Documents, 1851-1912, undated – 111 items
Series 8 Slavery, 1785-1884, undated – 40 items
Series 9 Songs and Poems, 1861-1876, undated – 59 items
Series 10 Supervisory Committee for Recruiting Colored Regiments, 1863-1864 – 13 items

Series Description, Part 1

Series 1: Henry Backus, 14th Illinois Infantry, Company D, 1861-1864 – 7 diaries

Henry Backus was from Green County, Illinois, and enlisted in June 1861. Backus’s diaries account for the 14th Illinois Infantry’s movements throughout the war, from Missouri to Mississippi. The diaries are marked by Backus’s bitter sentiments about his fellow soldiers and officers. A serious sense of duty to the Union’s cause and to his tasks as a soldier is also apparent in his writings.

Backus describes the difficult winter of 1862-1863, when the 14th was camped in Lafayette, Tennessee before entering Mississippi in May 1863 to participate in the Vicksburg Campaign. Once there, Backus describes the siege of Vicksburg, which lasted until early July. From there, he tells of the march to Jackson, Mississippi. After a furlough in August, Backus joined the Meridian Campaign under Sherman, which employed some of the brutal techniques later on display in the March to the Sea. Backus did not reenlist, and, after thirty-seven months of service, he returned home to Illinois.

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Series 2: Marshall Chase, 63rd Illinois Infantry, Company A, 1864-1865, 1912, 1919, undated – 4 items, including 1 diary and 1 personal history

Chase’s diary covers 1864-1865 and includes accounts of the battle at Missionary Ridge, Tennessee; Sherman’s March to the Sea; Savannah, Georgia; and a good deal on the end of the war. Also included in this series are a personal book Chase wrote some years later as his memoirs of the war and A History of the Civil War, written by Benson Lossing in 1912, with a hand-painted portrait of Marshall Chase pasted inside the front cover.

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Series 3: George P. Cumming, 102nd Illinois Infantry, Company H, 1862-1864, undated – 15 letters

George P. Cumming was born around 1832 in Tennessee. He was a married farmer when he enlisted on August 13, 1862 at Truro, Illinois. He mustered into the 102nd Illinois Infantry, Company H on September 2, 1862. Cumming was wounded at the front line before the siege of Atlanta (July 22, 1864-August 25, 1864) and was subsequently given a furlough. He was killed in a train accident near Lafayette, Indiana on October 31, 1864 while going home, survived by his widow and three children. There are fifteen letters, mostly addressed to his mother and sisters, dated between September 1862 and September 1864.

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Series 4: James M. Doig, 17th New York Infantry, 1861-1863 – 3 letters

The letters describe camp life among the “Conklin Rifles,” as Doig’s regiment was called, and comment on war.

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Series 5: Frank W. Fuller, Sergeant, 74th Illinois Infantry, Company I, 1862-1865 – 23 letters; 7 diaries; 2 account books

Fuller was a member of Company I, 74th Illinois Infantry and 4th Corps Ammo Train. He was from Freeport, Illinois and mustered in at Rockford, Illinois. His letters are primarily written to his fiancée, Mary M. Cable. His diaries include several drawings. His writings are lengthy and give in-depth descriptions of events, battles and deaths. These writings really give a sense of Fuller, especially because they include time before and after the war. His diaries and letters tell of his time in Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama and include details on battles and camp life.

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Series 6: Ulysses S. Grant, General and United States President, 1861-1880, undated – 14 letters, 2 additional items

Ulysses S. Grant was born in Ohio in 1822. He went to West Point and served in the Mexican-American War under General Zachary Taylor (who later became President in 1849). When the Civil War broke out, Grant was working for his father in Galena, Illinois. He was appointed to command a volunteer regiment. By September 1861, he had been promoted to Brigadier General of Volunteers.

In February 1862, Grant led successful campaigns against Fort Henry and Fort Donelson, earning him another promotion to Major General of Volunteers. He was less successful at the Battle of Shiloh in April 1862, but he continued to enjoy President Lincoln’s support. Grant went on to win major battles at Vicksburg, Mississippi, and Chattanooga, Tennessee. Lincoln appointed him General in Chief in March 1864.

In this role, Grant directed General Sherman to march through the south while he commanded the Army of the Potomac in Northern Virginia. On April 9, 1865, he accepted the Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s surrender. Grant went on to serve as United States President from 1869 to 1877. He died in 1885.

This series contains one autograph, one application to a veterans’ group, and 14 letters, one of which was written by Grant’s father. Those written by Grant himself were composed during the Civil War and after it. The letters written during the Civil War discuss tactics in great detail.

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Series 7: Rosell M. Hough, 9th Illinois Cavalry, 1861-1882 – 12 items, including letters and official orders

Rosell M. (R.M.) Hough was aide-de-camp of General David Hunter. Hunter was Commander of the Department of the South, and his father-in-law was John Kinzie, an early resident of Chicago. In civilian life, Major Hough was a prominent Chicago meatpacker. Many of his letters are concerned with such business matters. According to the Illinois muster records, Hough resigned from the military in April 1862.

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Series 8: William T. Humphrey, 101st Illinois Infantry, 1863-1865, undated – 10 items, including 1 diary and 4 letters

William T. Humphrey was a fife major with the 101st Illinois Volunteers. He joined the military in Jacksonville, Illinois, in August 1862. He served as a musician until he mustered out in June 1865. This series contains a diary and letters by Humphrey, as well as orders and certificates related to Humphrey’s service.

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Series 9: Nathaniel Colver Kenyon, 11th Illinois Infantry, 1862-1865 – 2 diaries

Nathaniel Colver Kenyon was born in Salem, New York. He joined the military as a sergeant in 1861 in LaSalle, Illinois. He was promoted to the rank of 1st Lieutenant a few months later. In 1863, he attained the rank of Captain while serving in Lake Providence, Louisiana. In 1864, he became Lieutenant Colonel, the rank at which he mustered out in 1865. During his service, he was taken prisoner at Fort Donelson, Tennessee, and suffered a head wound at Vicksburg, Mississippi.

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Series 10: Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon, 36th Illinois Infantry, Company B, 1862-1863 – 12 letters, 4 envelopes

Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon (February 3, 1838-September 19, 1863) was born in Adams County, Ohio. According to The Monmouth College Oracle, a publication of Illinois’s Monmouth College, McCutcheon entered the College in 1858. He enlisted in the 36th Illinois Infantry at Monmouth and traveled with the troops to Aurora, Illinois, where they were mustered into United States service on September 23, 1861. McCutcheon served in the 36th’s Missouri campaign and at the battle of Stones River near Murfreesboro, Tennessee. He was killed in the opening battle of Chickamauga, near Chattanooga, Tennessee, on September 19, 1863. His body was never recovered.

He had two brothers, John A. McCutcheon and James Fulton McCutcheon, who also served in the Civil War. John also died in battle. James, to whom most of these letters are written, survived the war. He went on to become a surgeon and mayor of Monmouth, Illinois. He died in 1911 in Indiana.

Throughout various official records, his name is spelled differently, sometimes “McCutcheon,” sometimes “McCutchan,” sometimes “McCutchen.” Further, he is listed in the Illinois muster as “Nathaniel P.” These letters are mostly written to his brother James F. who was also fighting at the time, and they describe his experiences as a soldier.

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Series 11: Geza Mihalotzy, 24th Illinois Infantry, 1861-1864, undated – 31 items, including letters, official orders and other documents

Geza Mihalotzy was born in Buda, Hungary sometime in the mid-1820s. He immigrated to the United States, settling in Chicago, where he joined the military to fight in the Civil War. He eventually served as colonel of the 24th Illinois Infantry. He died in battle in late February or early March 1864.

These letters are mostly written to Mihalotzy and document the administrative duties of a military leader. They include receipts for supplies, papers about equipment shipments, letters excusing soldiers from service for medical reasons and letters of discharge and resignation. Also included are communications to his wife, Hannah, when he was wounded and eventually died.

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Series 12: David W. Morris, 126th Illinois Infantry, Company H, 1862-1867 – 36 letters, 1 diary

David W. Morris joined Company H, 126th Illinois Volunteer Infantry in Coal Valley, Illinois. He wrote most frequently to Mary Thomas of Coal Valley, whom he eventually married. He sent letters from various locations, including Camp Douglas in Chicago, Bolivar, Tennessee, and DeValls Bluff, Arkansas, where he described a July 1864 battle. Morris described activities and experiences in camp and at war.

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Series 13: Annie F. Noble (Otis M. Moody, Company K, 51st Illinois Infantry, Headquarters detachment), 1852-1905, undated – 30 letters, 16 from Moody

This set of letters was written primarily to Annie F. Noble, mainly by Otis M. Moody, though letters between other correspondents and letters to Noble from other correspondents also appear. The Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection at Allen County Public Library in Indiana holds an additional set of 31 letters, mostly between Annie and Otis. The finding aid they created provides information about that collection.

Born in Massachusetts in 1829, Otis Moody moved to Chicago and enlisted in the 51st Illinois Volunteers on September 20, 1861. He became 1st lieutenant of Company K. He later became acting assistant adjutant general of the brigade under Luther Bradley and performed largely administrative duties. On September 19, 1863, Bradley led his troops into the battle at Chickamauga, near Chattanooga, Tennessee. On his way to dispatching Bradley’s orders, Moody was shot, and he died September 20, 1863.

Annie Fenwick Noble was born in England, on September 8, 1838. After her father, a Royal Navy commander, died during the Opium Wars in China, Annie and her mother moved to the United States in 1859. Annie lived in Brooklyn, New York, and was involved in Henry Ward Beecher's Plymouth Church. It is not known how Annie and Otis met, but their letters imply a religious connection. Annie married Charles Eliphalet Walbridge, a Civil War veteran and businessman in 1868, and they settled in Buffalo, New York. Annie died on September 28, 1910.

The religious connection Otis and Annie shared explains the use of the epithets “sister” and “brother” among the correspondents, despite sharing no blood relation. Additional correspondents in this set of letters are difficult to identify as they rarely include their last names. One additional letter of note in this set is written to Annie from Luther P. Bradley, colonel of the 51st Illinois, offering condolences on the death of Otis, and providing a description of the events surrounding his death.

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Series 14: E.N. Palley, Army of the Potomac, 1862-1863 – 4 letters

This set of letters were written to Palley’s wife and children from various locations in Virginia. His letters describe the hardship of war, including illness, night watch and marching.

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Series 15: R.D. Parker, Civilian, 1896-1901 – 31 letters

These letters, written to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, relate individual remembrances of the Battle of Sharpsburg in Maryland, more commonly known as Antietam. It appears that R.D. Parker was seeking firsthand accounts of the Battle of Antietam. Parker placed advertisements in a publication in Alabama requesting information on the Battle. Many responded to this ad, while others wrote to Parker because friends referred them. In correspondence back and forth, Parker would frequently send a map he was compiling and ask them to contribute information to the movements of troops on the map. Occasionally the letters are from soldiers who did not serve at Sharpsburg due to illness or injury in an earlier battle. These letters provide interesting Confederate perspective on actions they had participated in roughly 30 years earlier.

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Series 16: Fitz-John Porter, General, 1869-1951 – 4 letters, 1 report

Fitz-John Porter was born in New Hampshire in 1822. He graduated from West Point and served in the Mexican-American War. Porter began the Civil War as a colonel in the 15th U.S. Infantry. He was quickly promoted to Brigadier General in command of a division of the Army of the Potomac. In July 1862, Porter was promoted again to Major General of Volunteers. He was sent to reinforce Major General John Pope’s Army of Virginia.

Pope and Porter did not get along. They repeatedly disagreed about the disposition of troops at the Second Battle of Manassas (Bull Run). The battle ended in disaster for the Union, and Porter was relieved of duties in November 1862. In January 1863, Porter lost his court martial, resulting in dismissal from the Army.

Porter worked for the rest of his life to have this decision reversed and his rank reinstated. He also spent time as New York City Commissioner of Public Works, Police Commissioner and Fire Commissioner. In 1878, a special government commission exonerated Porter, finding his actions very likely saved the Army from suffering further damages. In 1886, President Chester A. Arthur reversed the 1863 decision, and Porter’s original rank as colonel was reinstated. He died in New Jersey in 1901. These letters and reports, written after the Civil War, are a part of Porter’s efforts to clear his name.

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Series 17: John W. Potter, 35th Indiana Infantry, Company B, 1865 – 17 letters

John W. Potter was born around 1826. A carpenter from Kendallville, Indiana, Potter began his military service in November 1864. He was sent to join the 35th Indiana Infantry in Tennessee, where it had been reduced to inactivity by heavy losses. The revitalized regiment fought in the battles of Franklin and Nashville, and pursued the Confederate General John Bell Hood. At the war's end, the 35th was sent to Texas where it was mustered out in September 1865.

The letters are written mostly to Potter’s wife, between 4 January and 14 July 1865. Potter, 37 at the time of his enlistment, had several children, and his letters reveal anxiety over his absence from home and the difficulty of communication.

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Series 18: Richard Realf, 88th Illinois Infantry, 1861-1864, undated – 12 items, including letters and poems

Realf, the son of a police constable, was born in 1834 and grew up in Sussex, Great Britain. He began writing poetry as a child, and, at 17 he became secretary to a Brighton physician and his wife, who introduced him to the literary circle of Lady Byron. In 1852, they arranged for the publication of his Guesses at the Beautiful, apparently the only volume of Realf's poetry to appear in his lifetime. In 1854, following a scandal, he immigrated to America, where he held a wide variety of jobs but continued writing throughout his life.

Upon his arrival, he became a teacher and administrator in New York, working with social outcasts and orphans. In 1856, he traveled to Kansas where he met John Brown and drilled with Brown's anti-slavery “army” until shortly before Harper's Ferry. In July 1862, he joined the 88th Illinois Infantry Volunteers at Chicago and served through the Civil War. He then served briefly as an officer in the 50th U.S. Colored Troops, which was disbanded after six months. He taught in a school for freed slaves and worked for the Internal Revenue Service in South Carolina. Between 1869 and 1875, Realf was on the editorial staff of the Pittsburgh Commercial. He lectured on slavery, the Civil War, temperance and literature. Realf frequently spoke at GAR reunions, and wrote the lyrics to the GAR anthem, “Rally.” In his later life, the behavior of his ex-wife, who followed him from town to town and caused public scenes, tormented him. In 1878, he moved to San Francisco, but his ex-wife followed him and stole or destroyed many of his papers. Realf committed suicide. The letters and poems in this series were composed during Realf’s service in the Civil War.

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Series 19: William Starke Rosecrans, General, 1862-1863, 1907 – 4 letters

William Starke Rosecrans was born in Ohio in 1819. He graduated from West Point and went on to teach there for several years. He was successful in civilian business life before returning to the military during the Civil War, beginning in the 23rd Ohio Infantry. He quickly climbed in rank, earning general by May 1861.

Rosecrans’s leadership was on display at many important battles including Rich Mountain, Iuka, Corinth, Stones River, Tullahoma and Chickamauga. Strategic and communication difficulties resulted in a major Union defeat at Chickamauga in September 1863, and Rosecrans was effectively removed from power. He was moved to Missouri in 1864 and helped resist some Confederate campaigns. He mustered out of service in 1866. Rosecrans moved to California in later life and was elected Congressman 1881-1885. He also served as the federal Register of the Treasury 1885-1893. He died in 1898.

These letters primarily relate to an encoded message sent by Rosecrans to General A.E. Burnside at the beginning of the Battle of Chickamauga. Included is a 1907 translation of the encoded message.

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Series 20: Philip Henry Sheridan, General, 1872-1879, undated – 2 letters, 1 autograph

Philip Henry Sheridan was born in Albany, New York, in 1831, and grew up in Ohio. He graduated from West Point. He fought in the Civil War, rising to command the Union’s Cavalry by the time the war ended. He led a campaign through the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia called “The Burning.” The tactics were brutal, but successful in decimating the Confederates’ supply lines and stores. He later helped win a decisive victory at Petersburg that hastened Lee’s surrender.

Following the Civil War, Sheridan went west and fought many battles against Native Americans on the plains. He was known for punishing tactics similar to those he employed during the Civil War. In 1871, he oversaw relief efforts following the Chicago Fire. He became Commanding General of the United States Army in 1883, and, just a few months before he died in 1888, he was promoted to General of the United States Army. These letters were written following the Civil War.

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Series 21: William T. Sherman, General, 1863-1874 – 6 letters, 1 autograph

William Tecumseh Sherman was born in Ohio in 1820. He graduated from the United States Military Academy. He resigned from the military in 1853 to pursue banking and law. When the Civil War broke out, he reenlisted and entered the 13th U.S. Infantry in 1861. Sherman rose through the ranks, leading troops at important battles such as First Bull Run, Shiloh, Vicksburg and Chattanooga.

Sherman is probably most famous for his devastating attack on Atlanta and his subsequent “March to the Sea,” during which he cut across Georgia to Savannah, burning anything he encountered. He turned north and continued his brutal tactics into the Carolinas, helping bring about the surrender of large numbers of Confederate soldiers.

Following the Civil War, Sherman commanded operations in the Missouri District that encompassed all land between the Rocky Mountains and the Mississippi River. In this capacity and in his later position as Commanding General of the United States Army, he waged many brutal battles against the Native Americans of the plains. He retired from the military in 1884 and died in New York City in 1891. This collection includes correspondence written during and after the Civil War.

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Series 22: John Corson Smith, 96th Illinois Infantry, 1862-1865 – 4 diaries

John Corson Smith was born in Philadelphia in 1832. He trained in carpentry and building and moved to Galena, Illinois, in 1854. He married and worked there leading construction projects until 1862 when he enlisted as a private in a volunteer company. The unit was mustered into the 96th Illinois Infantry as Company I, with Smith at the rank of major. In 1863, he was promoted to lieutenant colonel. In 1865, he was again promoted to brevet brigadier general for meritorious service.

After the war, he was appointed assessor for the Department of Revenue until 1872. In 1870 he moved to Chicago. He was elected Illinois State Treasurer in 1878 and 1882. He was Illinois Lieutenant Governor 1885-1889. He died in Chicago in 1910.

These diaries cover battles, marches, administrative duties and national events such as the assassination of President Lincoln. Especially noteworthy is his account of the Atlanta Campaign, during which he was wounded.

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Series 23: John B. Spiller, 31st Illinois Infantry, Company C, 1862-1863 – 9 letters

John B. Spiller was a private with the 31st Illinois Volunteer Infantry’s Company C. Spiller, enlisted in the 31st on August 30, 1862. A farmer from Williamson County, Illinois, the 44-year-old traveled from Camp Yates, Springfield, Illinois, to Jackson, Tennessee, to meet his regiment. His letters were sent from LaGrange, Tennessee and Vista Plantation, Louisiana. The last two letters include important mention of the Vicksburg campaign, including a description of the supply boats running the batteries. While Spiller’s accounts of military events are useful, the letters also provide a fascinating view into the details of Spiller’s domestic economy. The letters include frequent discussions of money—how much he is owed, methods by which he is sending it to his wife, how she should spend it—revealing that Spiller’s volunteering to serve was not simply motivated by patriotism. Spiller died at Young’s Point, Louisiana, on August 3, 1863.

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Series 24: David S. Stanley, General, 1862-1864 – 3 items

Evidently, a Mrs. Binney had asked General Stanley for some official document, possibly to raise money for a sanitary fair. One of these letters is from Stanley to Mrs. Binney stating that he does not have his official papers with him in the field but has asked his wife in Ohio to send a document to her. Another of the letters is from Mrs. Stanley to Mrs. Binney and includes the third item, a detailed report of the Battle of Iuka, written four days after the event by Stanley who served as division commander during the battle.

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Series 25: Jonathan Stewart, 74th Illinois Infantry, Company I, 1863-1865 – 2 diaries

Jonathan Stewart was living in Rock Run, Illinois, with his wife Nancy and his two daughters Ida and Jane when he enlisted in 1862. Sometime in the first half of 1863, he was either sick or injured and spent time in a hospital in Louisville, Kentucky. His recovery was never complete because in July of 1863 he was transferred to the Veterans Reserve Corps (VRC), which had formerly been named the Invalid Corps and was largely comprised or soldiers too disabled to fight on the front lines, but still able to fulfill some duties. As part of the VRC, Stewart served as a prison guard in Washington, D.C. in 1865. He returned to Illinois following the war.

These diaries have sparse entries that mostly comment on the weather and the mail he sent and received, with some mention of his health, activities and events of the war.

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Series 26: Flora Weaver, 1862-1865, undated – 12 letters, 2 envelopes

This series contains twelve letters addressed to Miss Flora A. Weaver of Lena, Illinois, from six soldiers in various Illinois units, 1862-1865. It appears that the soldiers and Miss Weaver were all friends and schoolmates back home. Biographical information for some of the correspondents follows.

Flora A. Weaver was born in Ohio around 1848, the eldest of four sisters and two brothers. By 1860, the family had moved to Lena, Illinois. Weaver married William Winter in Lena in 1870 with whom she had a son and daughter. In the early 1900s, she and her husband lived with their grown children in Rockford, Illinois. It is uncertain when she died.

Denison J. Griffing, a farmer born in Massachusetts, mustered into the 67th Illinois Infantry, Company H, as a private, on June 13, 1862 at Freeport, Illinois. His residence is listed as Lena, Illinois. He reenlisted on December 31, 1863, in Minnesota as a Private in the 1st Independent Battery Light Artillery. His name is spelled differently in different military databases.

John S. Pickard was born in Ohio around 1843. Later, living in Lena, Illinois, as a farmer, he mustered into the 67th Illinois Infantry, Company H, as a private, on June 13, 1862, in Chicago, Illinois. He reenlisted as a Private in the 14th Illinois U.S. Cavalry on November 6, 1862, in Lena, Illinois, and was mustered in on January 7, 1863 in Peoria, Illinois. He died on March 29, 1863, in Peoria.

David E. Rice was born in Indiana, Pennsylvania. Living in Lena, Illinois, as a young man, he enlisted in the 67th Illinois Infantry, Company H, on June 2, 1862. On October 23, 1862, he joined the 14th Illinois Cavalry, Company E. He later transferred to Company I where he remained until he mustered out on July 31, 1865, in Pulaski, Tennessee.

George S. Roush was born in Center County, Pennsylvania around 1840. He lived in Waddams, Stephenson County, Illinois, with his family in 1850. He enlisted as a corporal on September 10, 1861, in Freeport, Illinois, and was mustered into the 46th Illinois Infantry, Company B, on September 13, 1861, at Camp Butler, Illinois. He was promoted to Full 2nd Lieutenant and Full 1st Lieutenant before he resigned on April 18, 1862. He reenlisted for three years on December 23, 1863, at Camp Cowen, Mississippi. He died December 5, 1909.

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Series 27: James M. Welch, 16th Illinois Infantry, Company D, 1862-1865 – 2 diaries

James M. Welch of Carthage, Illinois, enlisted in the 16th Illinois Infantry, Company D, on May 24, 1861. He reenlisted December 23, 1863, and rose to the rank of sergeant. He was appointed 2nd Lieutenant July 3, 1865, but was then discharged with his regiment. As a veteran, Welch joined Grand Army of the Republic Post #96 in Quincy, Illinois. He died January 28, 1917.

Welch’s diaries represent several different kinds of records, including ledger book, unofficial muster roll and company diary. Welch’s accounts of small unit actions reveal details not easily found elsewhere. He fought in the Siege of Corinth, April-June, 1862; at Farmington, Mississippi on May 3 and May 9, 1862; in Western and Middle Tennessee; and in Sherman’s Carolinas Campaign, including the battles at Averysboro and Bentonville.

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Series 28: William R. Wilder, 9th Illinois Cavalry, Company F, 1862-1865 – 21 letters

These letters were written between April 12, 1862 and October 30, 1865. William R. Wilder enlisted in the 9th Regiment Illinois Cavalry Volunteers on October 7, 1861. He was promoted to bugler in Company F. He mustered out on October 31, 1865.

Most of these letters were written to Wilder’s aunt. He discusses troop movements, daily camp life, skirmishes, illness and the dead and dying. He mentions an African American regiment in one letter. Wilder refers to his regiment as Brackels Cavalry, Company F. Brackels was an officer in the unit. The unit moved through Missouri, Tennessee, Mississippi and Alabama.

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Series 29: General Letters, 1847-1924, undated, bulk 1861-1865 – 43 letters

This series represents a variety of participants in the Civil War: Union and Confederate, ranked leaders and common soldiers. They cover a number of contexts, as well. Some of the leaders appearing here are John Bragg, James B. McPherson, Andrew Johnson, Franz Sigel, Benjamin Butler, Albert Sidney Johnston, William Denison, James A. Garfield, John Hunt Morgan, Daniel Ruggles, E. Kirby Smith, Abner Doubleday, James Longstreet, Horace Porter and John Alexander McClernand. Letters are arranged alphabetically by author’s last name.

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Series 30: General Diaries, Narrative Accounts and Minute Books, 1860-1886 – 13 diaries

These 13 items are written mostly by rank and file soldiers fighting for the Union during the Civil War. An item that gives a different perspective is a minute book from a Soldiers’ Aid Society formed by women in Ohio. Items are arranged alphabetically by author’s last name.

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Series Description, Part 2

Series 1: Currency, 1856-1864, undated – 100 items

This series contains Confederate currency, federal postage/fractional currency and state and regional bank currency issued before and during the Civil War. During the Civil War, coins fell out of use as people and banks held onto them for the value of the metal out of which they were made. As a result, it was difficult to make change under $1.00. Anything of a set value less than $1.00 was accepted to make change, with postage stamps becoming the preferred currency. F.E. Spinner, U.S. Treasurer at the time, adopted the use of postage stamps for fractional currency by pasting them onto slips of paper. The Post Office and Congress both authorized this use of stamps as currency. This postal currency was succeeded by fractional currency, printed money in denominations less than $1.00. Fractional currency was used until 1876 when the widespread issuance of metal to make coins was resumed. Many examples of this postage and fractional currency appear in this collection. Pre-Civil War currency comes chronologically at the beginning of this series, followed by Confederate currency arranged chronologically, and then United States Treasury currency arranged chronologically.

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Series 2: Elections, 1862-1877 – 11 items

This series contains material related to presidential elections in the years during and surrounding the Civil War. Included are officially published platforms, instructions to election inspectors and admissions tickets to the 1869 inauguration and the 1877 vote counting session. Of note are the platform listings for the 1864 presidential election in which Abraham Lincoln won reelection with Andrew Johnson as his running mate. Items are arranged chronologically.

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Series 3: Patriotic Envelopes, 1861-1865, undated – 27 items

During the Civil War, mailing envelopes were printed with patriotic images, sayings and poems. This series collects a number of these envelopes. Union envelopes are listed first, followed by Confederate envelopes.

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Series 4: Ephemera, 1861-1911, undated – 44 items

This series includes newspapers, newsletters, newspaper clippings, train tickets, military passes, admission tickets, stamps, recruitment posters, a Negro passport, broadsides, advertisements, railroad timetables and a canceled check. The newspapers and newsletters were often created by soldiers, and of particular note is an issue of The Prisoner Vidette, produced in Camp Douglas Prison, Chicago, Illinois. Items are arranged chronologically.

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Series 5: Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) and other Civil War Veterans Groups

Subseries A: Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) and other Civil War Veterans Groups, 1866-1957, undated – 46 items

This subseries contains information related to the formation and operation of the GAR and other Civil War veterans groups. The GAR departments described are usually based in Illinois and Chicago. Items are arranged chronologically.

Subseries B: Grand Army of the Republic Enlistment Forms, 1866 – 80 items

This subseries includes 80 enlistment forms for the GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1 in Decatur, Illinois, the post that first established the GAR. Items are arranged sequentially by accession number.

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Series 6: Abraham Lincoln, 1841-2005, undated – 31 items

This series contains material about Abraham Lincoln. It includes a manuscript property deed from 1841; transcripts of speeches he gave in a variety of settings, including before he became president; published general military orders; scholarly works about Lincoln; information on his funeral events, including orders of procession in a number of cities and addresses and sermons delivered at memorial services; brochures from posthumous birthday celebrations and from the dedication of his presidential library and museum; and schoolwork completed by his grandson. Items are arranged chronologically.

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Series 7: Publications, Forms, Certificates, Official Documents, 1851-1912, undated – 111 items

Here are collected a variety of publications and officially printed forms, certificates and documents. This series includes published military reports; published special and general military orders; soldiers’ discharge papers; certificates of military service; oaths of allegiance; blank forms; published pamphlets of speeches, statements, addresses, correspondence, orders and similar materials compiled on particular subjects; a prayer book; an almanac; scholarly lectures; an historical guidebook to Gettysburg; recommendations and endorsements for promotion, discharge and transfer; logs of supplies and clothing distributed to soldiers; soldier attendance logs; and a log kept by a surgeon with the Iowa 26th of medical treatment and prescriptions, along with a list of casualties. Items are arranged chronologically.

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Series 8: Slavery, 1785-1884, undated – 40 items

This series contains notices, bills, receipts and correspondence related to the sale and purchase of individual slaves. Also included in this series are a number of published speeches and treatises on the topic of slavery all over the world. The publications include items related to slavery in the United States, as well as a number of pamphlets published in London, Great Britain, discussing slavery in the British colonies, Haiti, Jamaica, France, the West Indies and the Gold Coast in Africa. Items are arranged chronologically.

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Series 9: Songs and Poems, circa 1820s-1876, undated – 59 items

This series includes a variety of songs and poems written before, during and about the Civil War or American slavery. Most are published, while some are handwritten.

The songs with the accession numbers beginning “91.17” were purchased together as a set and include eight British ballad broadsides relating to American slavery, circa 1820s-1830s. Woodcut illustrations appear at the top of each, with the text appearing below. Most songs were popular at the time. They include, “Come Back, Massa’s in de Cold Ground;” “Miss Lucy Long;” “The Boatman of the Ohio;” “Billy Pattison;” “I’m Off to Charlestown;” and “Happy Are We Niggers So Gay.”

Other items of note are the Hopkins’ New Orleans 5 Cent Song Book and poems by William Lloyd Garrison, Frances Anne Kemble, Kate Putnam Osgood, Frederick George Root, Adeline D.T. Whitney and others. Items are arranged chronologically.

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Series 10: Supervisory Committee for Recruiting Colored Regiments, 1863-1864 – 13 items

This series contains material related to the Supervisory Committee for Recruiting Colored Regiments and the affiliated Free Military School. Included are form letters, reports, by-laws and announcements. Items are arranged chronologically.

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Item List: Part 1

Series 1: Henry Backus, 14th Illinois Infantry, Company D, 1861-1864

2009.9.2 Box 18 Diary 1, written by Henry Backus, 1861 June 1-1862 March 20. Transcription available.
2009.9.3 Box 18 Diary 3, written by Henry Backus, 1862 December 1-1863 January 18. Transcription available.
2009.9.4 Box 18 Diary 4, written by Henry Backus, 1863 January 19-1863 May 17. Transcription available.
2009.9.5 Box 18 Diary 5, written by Henry Backus, 1863 May 18-1863 July 17. Transcription available.
2009.9.6 Box 18 Diary 6, written by Henry Backus, 1863 July 18-1864 February 3. Transcription available.
2009.9.7 Box 18 Diary 7, written by Henry Backus, 1864 February 4-1864 March 16. Transcription available.
2009.9.8 Box 18 Diary 8, written by Henry Backus, 1864 March 17-1864 June 29. Transcription available.

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Series 2: Marshall Chase, 63rd Illinois Infantry, Company A, 1864-1865, 1912, 1919, undated

2007.58 Box 15 Diary, written by Marshall Chase, 1864 January 1-1865 December 31. Written in Huntsville, Alabama. Appears to have been used for 1864 and 1865. The diary is printed with 1864 dates, but some entries are from 1865. Includes lists and accounts at the end.
2007.59.A-B Box 15 Book, A History of the Civil War, 1861-1865, and the causes that led up to the great conflict by Benson J. Lossing; Mathew B. Brady; Henry A. Ogden. Published by The Tomkins Art & Portfolio Co., Yonkers, New York, 1912. Painted portrait in front of book of Marshall Chase.
2007.60 Box 15 Personal history written by Marshall Chase, 1919 September 11. “Personal, Military, and Civil History: dedicated by Marshall Chase as an Heirloom to Posterity.” Copyright 1902. Presented to Frank and Annie Chase. Includes certificates, photographs and handwritten personal reminisces.
2007.57 Box 15 Notes on Marshall Chase’s collection, undated

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Series 3: George P. Cumming, 102nd Illinois Infantry, Company H, 1862-1864, undated

2007.61.O Box 15 Letter written by George P. Cumming to unknown recipient, [1862]. Discusses his improved health; a soldier sent out to guard cattle, promising to bring back a chicken; Paul Vanwinkle being gravely ill at Scottville; two 102nd soldiers being sick.
2007.61.B Box 15 Letter written by George P. Cumming to his sisters, 1862 September 9. Written in Knoxville, Tennessee. Discusses how he doesn’t know when they’ll leave; he indicates that the sisters had visited him; he expects approval of a $50 advance; he discusses the difficulty of writing letters while on a horse.
2007.61.C Box 15 Letter written by George P. Cumming to his sister, 1862 September 22. Written in Galesburg, [Illinois]. Discusses attending a conference and how half of the regiment left for Peoria that morning.
2007.61.D.1-2 Box 15 Letter written by George P. Cumming to his sister, 1862 October 21-22. Written in Frankfort, Kentucky. Discusses that he has had diarrhea; describes travel from Peoria to Jeffersonville [Jeffersontown near Louisville, Kentucky]; states that many are sick and collapse on marches; tells how they marched 17 miles to Lawrence Bay expecting Morgan’s cavalry to be there [John Hunt Morgan?]; tells how Morgan escaped but many men were captured; describes marching, camping, lack of clean water and meals; relates a Confederate defeat at a bridge outside Shelbyville [Kentucky].
2007.61.A Box 15 Letter written by George P. Cumming to his sisters and mother, 1862 December 27. Written in Gallatin, Tennessee. Tells about recent letters; how Confederates vandalized train tracks; that he has had a cold and diarrhea; about building fortifications west of the town; how 102nd had one battery of six guns; about promotions and resignations in the 102nd; describes his tent; discusses people at home; recommends his mother rent the farm, may not be back by spring.
2007.61.E.1-2 Box 15 Letter written by George P. Cumming to his sisters and mother, 1863 February 4. Written in Gallatin, Tennessee. Fragile paper. States his health is improved; gives news of other soldiers; says he has received a package from home; discusses prices of food; discusses railroad running from Louisville for the last three days; requests newspapers, the Knox Republican; describes the process of drawing rations and preparing food; states his company hasn’t had to fight yet; tells of the pursuit of Morgan [John Hunt Morgan?]; says he sent money by William Thomas to ship his son’s remains to Elmwood but doesn’t have enough.
2007.61.F Box 15 Letter written by George P. Cumming to his sisters, 1863 February 28. Written in Gallatin, Tennessee. Discusses working in commissary; health is good; receives letters from wife every week; regiment doesn’t have its own hospital; recommends she not leave home; tells of soldiers wounded or killed; tells about a job opening in a hospital paying $9.00 a month.
2007.61.G Box 15 Letter written by George P. Cumming to his sisters and mother, 1863 April 19. Written in Gallatin, Tennessee. Discusses that his health is good; farmers in the area aren’t planting too many crops; company hasn’t had to fight yet; soldiers going to Carthage with mail and cattle were fired on and the cattle stolen; the campground is pleasant, describes how he fixed up his tent; tells of an Indiana soldier being captured; his wife has sold most of their property; has drawn 4 months wages and sent most home; gives the cost of articles of clothing.
2007.61.H Box 15 Letter written by George P. Cumming to his sisters and mother, 1863 July 16. Written in Fort Overall, Tennessee. Discusses that he is feeling lonely; had diarrhea again but is better; company is in very good health; captain is not well respected; thinks prospects are good for victory; says Lee is going to Tennessee and Morgan to Indiana; asks about people at home.
2007.61.I Box 15 Letter written by George P. Cumming to his sister Sarah, 1863 July 28. Written in Fort Overall, Tennessee. Discusses fresh fruit is abundant; letters he’s received; good news about the war, how that affects the soldiers; Morgan has been captured; Lieutenant Tucker and 102nd soldiers captured a group of Confederates shooting black men in the area; describes cannon balls, shell debris and damage to trees at an old battleground; tells of a soldier sent to guard a house nearby; he is on guard duty every four days.
2007.61.J Box 15 Letter written by George P. Cumming to his sisters and mother, 1863 November 5. Written in Fort Overall, Tennessee. Discusses that he is in good health; has had no fighting; tells of a stockade and bridge three miles from Murfreesboro taken by the Confederates; discusses wounded and lost soldiers in other Illinois units; describes improvements to quarters; describes bread he makes for group with whom he eats; expects regiment to be mounted and possibly moved farther south; may soon get Spencer rifles; subscribed to the Knoxville Whig newspaper.
2007.61.K Box 15 Letter written by George P. Cumming to his mother, 1864 February 12. Written in Fort Overall, Tennessee. Discusses that his health is good; unit recently had marching orders, later countermanded; anxious to get news from home and George Berry; 22nd Company Wisconsin there with them still; sent money home, wants to know if it was received.
2007.61.M Box 15 Letter written by George P. Cumming to his mother, 1864 June 14. Written in battlefield between Acworth and Marietta, Georgia. Discusses short rations for three weeks, forged an order to buy food; unit has been in this camp a week; raining a lot for two weeks, hard to move artillery; 89th camping near, learned from them of May 29th battle [Picket’s Mill, Georgia], Thomas Berry’s death, others wounded; visited the camp of the 112th Illinois; conversed with a Confederate prisoner from Rock Springs, [Tennessee?], where Cumming once lived; expects the war to end soon; unit dwindled to 25 men, 4 have been killed; wounded men at Chattanooga, Tennessee.
2007.61.L Box 15 Letter written by George P. Cumming to his sisters and mother, 1864 July 9. Written in sight of Atlanta, Georgia. Discusses how he thinks he was southwest of Marietta when he last wrote; describes front line, Confederate sharpshooters; skirmishes with Confederates on road to Marietta; had diarrhea; positions of the 23rd, 20th, and 14th Corps in relation to the river; describes the abandoned Confederate fort; received news the 23rd crossed the river; expects to be camped here 10-20 days; Confederates have been crossing the river; requests writing paper and envelopes; describes new vegetable soup rations.
2007.61.N Box 15 Letter written by George P. Cumming to his sisters and mother, 1864 September 20. Written in Atlanta, Georgia. Discusses that he was in hospital, 3rd Division; wounds are healing; about 200 soldiers in the hospital; expecting the paymaster, most men haven’t been paid for months; 1st Brigade is in the city, 102nd camped a half mile away; men wish Elliot would resign; not hopeful about getting a furlough; wants to be detailed with the commissary or quartermaster.
2007.61.P Box 15 Photograph, carte de visite of George P. Cumming, undated

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Series 4: James M. Doig, 17th New York Infantry, 1861-1863

86.30.1.A-B Box 9 Letter written by James M. Doig to Cousin William, 1861 October 27. Written in Booneville, New York.
86.30.2.A-B Box 9 Letter written by James M. Doig to Cousin [William], 1862 January 19. Written in Booneville, New York.
86.30.3.A-B Box 9 Letter written by James M. Doig to M.J. Doig, 1863 April 5. Written in camp near Stafford, Virginia.

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Series 5: Frank W. Fuller, Sergeant, 74th Illinois Infantry, Company I, 1862-1865

2007.54.X.1 Box 14 Diary written by Frank W. Fuller, 1862 May 26 - 1862 June 12
2007.54.Y.1 Box 14 Diary written by Frank W. Fuller, 1862 August 27 - 1863 February 22. Written at "Camp Fuller," Rockford, Illinois; Bowling Green, Kentucky; Jeffersonville.
2007.54.A.1-3 Box 14 Letter written by Lydia Fuller to Frank W. Fuller, brother, 1862 December 21. Written in Thornburn Farms. 2007.54.A.3 is envelope to Mary M. Cable. Also includes brief transcribed excerpt.
2007.54.Z.1-2 Box 14 Diary written by Frank W. Fuller, 1863 February 23-1864 January 28. Written in Chattanooga, Tennessee (Mission Ridge); Murfreesboro, Tennessee; Winchester, Tennessee. Entries in the back are out of sequential order. Includes a list of his correspondence as well as a wish for the diary to be sent to Mary Cable, should he die in battle.
2007.54.AA.1 Box 14 Diary written by Frank W. Fuller, 1864 February 15-1864 March 26. Written in London, Tennessee. Includes list of correspondence and brief note to Mary Cable, as he is sending this diary to her.
2007.54.B.1-3 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1864 February 19. Written in London, Tennessee.
2007.54.C.1-2 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1864 March 13. Written in London, Tennessee.
2007.54.BB.1-3 Box 14 Diary written by Frank W. Fuller, 1864 March 27 - 1864 September 12. Written in London, Tennessee; Resaca, Georgia (Buzzard's Roost). Includes two reproductions of sketches; list of equipment and supplies; list of correspondence; poem.
2007.54.D.1-2 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1864 April 7. Written in London, Tennessee.
2007.54.E.1-2 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1864 June 15. Written in Altoona Mountains, near Acworth, Georgia. Difficult to read.
2007.54.F.1-3 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1864 July 10. Written near the Chattahoochee River in Georgia. Includes newspaper clipping of poem "To Mary" written for the Waverley Magazine by Joseph Bowes.
2007.54.G.1-2 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1864 August 17. Written near Atlanta, Georgia during the siege.
2007.54.H.1-2 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1864 August 23. Written near Atlanta, Georgia.
2007.54.CC.1 Box 14 Diary written by Frank W. Fuller, 1864 September 13 - 1865 June 16. Written in Atlanta, Georgia; Chattanooga, Tennessee. Includes an account of ammunition issued and a list of correspondence.
2007.54.I.1-3 Box 14 Letter written by Lydia Fuller to Frank W. Fuller, brother, 1864 October 27. Written in Baldwinsville, New York.
2007.54.J.1-2 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1864 November 21. Written in Pulaski, Tennessee.
2007.54.K.1-2 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1865 January 11. Written in Huntsville, Alabama.
2007.54.L.1-3 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1865 January 25. Written in Huntsville, Alabama.
2007.54.M.1-2 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1865 February 2. Written in Huntsville, Alabama.
2007.54.N.1-2 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1865 February 15. Written in Huntsville, Alabama.
2007.54.O.1-3 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1865 March 2. Written in Huntsville, Alabama.
2007.54.P.1-2 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1865 March 9. Written in Huntsville, Alabama.
2007.54.Q.1-3 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1865 March 13. Written in Huntsville, Alabama. Includes partial transcription describing a visit to a plantation being run by the Union government where the former slaves worked the land, with the males getting paid.
2007.54.R.1-3 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1865 April 3. Written in Bulls Gap, Tennessee. Includes partial transcription describing a train accident on their way north, and his brief views of Knoxville.
2007.54.S.1-2 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1865 April 23. Written in Knoxville, Tennessee. Includes partial transcription stating that they are on their way home.
2007.54.T.1-2 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1865 May 19. Written in Camp Harker, near Nashville, Tennessee. A long letter describing how they are awaiting orders for mustering out. He believes the armies that marched to Washington must begin first before they will receive their orders. So, he can't predict when he will return home. Much of the letter describes a relationship with the daughter of a family friend, assuring his fiancée it was only ever friendship.
2007.54.U.1-3 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1865 May 27. Written in Camp Harker, near Nashville, Tennessee. Includes partial transcription relating that he will go to Chicago to collect his pay and muster out. He says it won't be long before they are on their way home.
2007.54.V.1-3 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1865 June 5. Written in Camp Harker, near Nashville, Tennessee. Discusses the logistics of returning. First to Chicago to be paid, then to Rockford, possibly with the Company. He regrets that they must reunite with crowds of people around them.
2007.54.W.1-2 Box 14 Letter written by Frank W. Fuller to Mary M. Cable, fiancée, 1865 June 8. Written in Camp Harker, near Nashville, Tennessee. Includes partial transcript reporting that he has been mustered out of the service of the U.S. He goes on to report he expects to be home within a couple of weeks, with a stop in Chicago to get paid.
2007.54.DD.1 Box 14 Diary written by Frank W. Fuller, 1865 June 17-1866 April 1. Includes his return home, his wedding to Mary Cable, their months-long honeymoon east to visit family and friends in Rochester, New York; Syracuse, New York; Stockbridge and Pittsfield, Massachusetts; New York, New York; Newark, New Jersey; Cleveland, Ohio. Includes poems in the back.
2007.54.EE.1 Box 14 Account book kept by Mary M. Cable, 1862 August 5-1864 May 21. Written in Pecatonica, Winnebago County, Illinois. Account book kept by Mary M. Cable of money sent to her by her fiancé Frank W. Fuller who was fighting in the Civil War. Includes information on amounts and deposits.
2007.54.FF.1 Box 14 Book listing correspondence kept by Mary M. Cable, 1862 October 4-1865 June 16. Written in Lysander, Winnebago County, Illinois. A book listing correspondence between Mary M. Cable and her fiancé Frank W. Fuller who was fighting in the Civil War. Also includes recipes for medicines for horses and a poem written to Frank from his sister Lydia.

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Series 6: Ulysses S. Grant, General and United States President, 1861-1880, undated

72.277 Box 1 Letter written by Jesse Root Grant [father of U.S. Grant] to Judge Edward Bates, 1861 April 25. Written in Covington, Kentucky. When the Civil War began, Ulysses S. Grant was living in Galena, Illinois, a retired army captain. He wished to serve in the war, and so he asked his father to help him obtain an appointment. In this letter, Jesse Grant writes to Edward Bates, then U.S. Attorney General, seeking his help.
72.280 Box 1 Letter written by Ulysses S. Grant to Major General William T. Sherman, 1862 August 8 [?]. Written in Corinth [?], Tennessee. Extremely faded and difficult to read.
72.284 Box 1 Letter written by Ulysses S. Grant to Gen. William S. Rosecrans, 1862 September 15. Written in Corinth, [Mississippi]. This letter asks that an accompanying letter be sent via a flag of truce to a Confederate officer regarding a prisoner exchange.
72.285 Box 1 Letter written by Ulysses S. Grant to Brigadier General J. McArthur, 1863 February 8. Written at Headquarters Department of the Tennessee before Vicksburg [Mississippi]. The letter discusses that cotton speculators should be prohibited from leaving camp to purchase cotton.
72.279 Box 1 Letter written by Ulysses S. Grant, 1863 February 24; 1863 March 13. Endorses McArthur for promotion. Also endorsed and signed by Illinois governor Richard Yates and [illegible], Army Major General.
72.281 Box 1 Letter written by Ulysses S. Grant to his father, Jesse Root Grant, 1863 April 21. Written in Milliken's Bend, Louisiana. Discusses the criticism appearing in the press of his second campaign against Vicksburg, Mississippi. Also refuses to give his father a permit to buy cotton, explaining the problems with cotton speculators abusing the situation.
72.283 Box 1 Letter written by Ulysses S. Grant to Major General N.P. Banks, 1863 October 5. Written in Vicksburg, Mississippi.
89.1.2 Box 8 Letter written by Ulysses S. Grant to H.W. Halleck, General in Chief, Washington, D.C., 1863 December 7. Written in Chattanooga, Tennessee. [Not written in Grant's hand.] Discusses leaving a small force at Chattanooga to hold the area during the rainy season as the roads won't be passable and it's unlikely the Confederates could move back into Tennessee. He'd then take a larger force by way of New Orleans to attack Mobile, Alabama. He hopes this would force Lee to abandon Virginia and North Carolina in order to assist. Awaits response from Halleck before acting.
89.1.3 Box 8 Letter written by Ulysses S. Grant to H.W. Halleck, General in Chief, Washington, D.C., 1863 December 17. Written in Chattanooga, Tennessee. [Not written in Grant's hand.] Discusses Sherman and Burnside's forces also in East Tennessee. It seems there is enough bread and meat in the country there to sustain the troops through the winter. They are accumulating supplies via steamship and rail, and Grant plans to travel to Nashville and Louisville to shore up defenses. He discusses morale being low among Bragg's forces. He hopes to be able to set the course in the spring instead of having the Confederates dictate.
89.1.5 Box 8 Letter written by Ulysses S. Grant to H.W. Halleck, General in Chief, Washington, D.C., 1864 January 7. Written in Nashville, Tennessee. [Not written in Grant's hand.] Recommends abandoning a move on Richmond and instead move on Raleigh, starting from Suffolk and eventually using New Bern as the base. Ultimately, Wilmington would be secured, which was then a vital Confederate port. Expounds on the merits of this plan.
89.1.4 Box 8 Letter written by Ulysses S. Grant to G.H. Thomas, Major General, at Chattanooga, 1864 January 19. Written in Nashville, Tennessee. [Not written in Grant's hand.] Discusses his ideas for the strategy in the spring. Immediately, though, Longstreet is still in East Tennessee, and so they must deal with him. Ultimately, Grant envisions a line from Chattanooga to Mobile, with Montgomery and Atlanta as points between. He recommends against attacking Richmond, rather securing sites on North Carolina's coast. Thomas should keep up appearances of preparing to mount an advance from Chattanooga so that the Confederates won't realize they're working on Mobile instead.
72.287 Box 1 Letter written by Ulysses S. Grant to Major General Parke, 1864 September 4. Written in City Point, Virginia. This letter directs commanders to arrange firing a salute in honor of Sherman’s capture of Atlanta.
72.286 Box 1 Letter written by Ulysses S. Grant to General Meigs, 1867 February 15. Written in Washington, D.C.
72.299 Box 1 Note written by Ulysses S. Grant to [Secretary of War], 1871 February 19. "Grant as President. Memorandum to Scty."
72.303 Box 1 Application for membership by Ulysses S. Grant, 1880 October 2. Written in Chicago, Illinois. Application for membership in the Chicago Union Veteran Club.
72.827 Box 4 Autograph by Ulysses S. Grant.

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Series 7: Rosell M. Hough, 9th Illinois Cavalry, 1861-1882

72.1028 Box 4 Orders No. 3. Head Quarters, First Regiment, Western Cavalry. 1861 September 14. Appointment of Rosell M. Hough to rank of Major.
72.1027 Box 4 Orders No. 5. Head Quarters, Western Department. Springfield, Illinois, 1861 November 4. Orders for R.M. Hough to arrest Major Phinney and send him and “whatever public money may be in his possession” back to Headquarters.
72.551.A-B Box 3 Letter written by David Hunter to R.M. Hough, 1861 December 2. Written in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.
72.1026 Box 4 Form letter written by Ed. W. Smith for Major General David Hunter, 1861 December 7. Written in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Leave of absence request for R.M. Hough.
72.1022 Box 4 Letter written by E.W. Smith to R.M. Hough, 1862 January 27. Written in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.
72.1025 Box 4 Letter written by Ed. W. Smith to R.M. Hough, 1862 January 29. Written in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.
72.1020 Box 4 Special Orders No. 11, signed by Charles Halpine. Hilton Head, Port Royal, South Carolina, 1862 April 5. Orders for R.M. Hough to report to Colonel J. Wilson Shaffer for duty as Superintending Officer, with Captains D.W. Thompson and W.R. Dole reporting to Hough.
72.549 Box 3 Letter written by George W. Moon to R.M. Hough, 1862 April 11. Written in Chicago, Illinois.
72.1024 Box 4 Special Orders No. 24, signed by Charles Halpine. Hilton Head, South Carolina, 1862 April 17. Orders for R.M. Hough to escort 180 prisoners captured at Fort Pulaksi, Georgia, to Fort Columbus, New York.
72.1021 Box 4 Letter written by A.H. Covert to R.M. Hough, 1862 April 21. Written in Chicago, Illinois.
72.1023 Box 4 Letter written by Richard Ward to R.M. Hough, 1862 May 20. Written in New York.
72.1029 Box 4 Letter written by David Hunter to R.M. Hough, 1882 January 11. Written in Washington, D.C.

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Series 8: William T. Humphrey, 101st Illinois Infantry, 1863-1865, undated

72.1032 Box 4 Orders written by Charles H. Fox, 2nd Illinois Battalion to William T. Humphrey, 1863 April 29. Written in Paroled Men Benton Barracks, Missouri.
72.543 Box 3 Special Order No. 63 written by Colonel Bonneville, 1863 May 18. Written in Benton Barracks, Missouri. "William Humphrey Co. D, 101st Illinois Infantry is hereby detailed on duty with the Post Band and will immediately report to William McGowan, leader for orders."
72.1034 Box 4 Special Orders No. 82 written by Benjamin Bonneville, Head Quarters, Camp of Instruction, 1863 June 15. Written in Benton Barracks, Missouri. Regarding William T. Humphrey's assignment.
72.1033 Oversize Folder 3 Letter written by William T. Humphrey to parents, 1864 December 16
  Box 3 Diary written by William T. Humphrey, 1863 July 23-1865 June 20. Written in Atlanta, Georgia. Humphrey was a fife major for the 101st Illinois Infantry. In this diary he recounts his experiences from the day he enlists to day he is discharged. He was present at the capture of Atlanta and marched with Sherman to Savannah.
72.542 Box 3 Letter written by William T. Humphrey to parents, 1865 April 17. Written in Raleigh, North Carolina. Announces end of war.
72.1030 Box 4 Certificate of appointment written by W.H. Watson, 1865 October 20. Written in Atlanta, Georgia. For William Humphrey from the Office Assessor, Internal Revenue.
72.541 Box 3 Letter written by William T. Humphrey to parents, 186[?] December 24. Written in Savannah, Georgia.
72.1031 Oversize Box 23 Form for Grand Army of the Republic Record Book, William T. Humphrey, circa 1890
72.1037 Box 4 Letter written by William T. Humphrey, undated. Only page 2 exists.

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Series 9: Nathaniel Colver Kenyon, 11th Illinois Infantry, 1862-1865

2007.65.A Box 15 Diary written by Nathaniel Colver Kenyon, 1862
2007.65.B Box 15 Diary written by Nathaniel Colver Kenyon, 1864-1865. Includes account and soldier listings.

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Series 10: Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon, 36th Illinois Infantry, Company B, 1862-1863

2007.67.A Box 16 Letter written by Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon to brother, 1862 February 7. Written in camp near Salem, Tennessee. Discusses that they have taken more than 50 conscripts, many deserters from the Confederate army; Rosecrans is seen as “master spirit” of army; recruits from convalescent camps; making fortifications; forage expeditions go out ten miles; Siege of Donelson; how he would not like being a field officer in a “Darkie Regiment,” but says there is no dishonor in it.
2007.67.B Box 16 Letter written by Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon to brother Jim [James Fulton McCutcheon, 2nd Iowa Infantry, Company H], 1862 March 24. Written in Camp Rolla, Missouri. Describes some members of regiment; describes clothes and blankets; discusses news they’ve received from the front; admires his Captain, Silas Miller.
2007.67.C Box 16 Letter written by Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon to brother Jim [James Fulton McCutcheon, 2nd Iowa Infantry, Company H], 1862 May 29. Written in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Includes envelope. Describes a reenlisted soldier’s experience with surgeons.
2007.67.D Box 16 Letter written by Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon to brother Jim [James Fulton McCutcheon, 2nd Iowa Infantry, Company H], 1862 June 20. Written in Rienzi, Mississippi. Discusses how they are almost finished making fortifications; there are frequent alarms but no skirmishes; mentions a local man saying he had lost $25,000 “in the shape of Ebonies”; contains humorous observations on the recent naval battle of Memphis.
2007.67.E.1-2 Box 16 Letter written by Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon to brother Jim [James Fulton McCutcheon, 2nd Iowa Infantry, Company H], 1862 July 15. Written in Mississippi. Includes envelope. States they were sent to Boonsville to support the First Missouri Battery; exchanged fire with the enemy but they kept out of sight; a Negro whose master had been killed gave information to the general but his account of the number of troops was unreliable. Recounts story in dialect.
2007.67.F.1-2 Box 16 Letter written by Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon to brother Jim [James Fulton McCutcheon, 2nd Iowa Infantry, Company H], 1862 July 17. Written in Cowin Station, Tennessee. Includes envelope. States that they marched from picket line; Sheridan and Branson had found Tullahoma evacuated; describes fortifications of rifle defenses and abatis there; came across many deserters; ate a harvest of blackberries and huckleberries.
2007.67.G.1-2 Box 16 Letter written by Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon to brother Jim [James Fulton McCutcheon, 2nd Iowa Infantry, Company H], 1862 July 26. Written in Rienzi, Mississippi. Tells how they made a well at camp; he is in favor of Pope’s plan of “subsisting off the enemy”; soldiers on picket shoot off their fingers.
2007.67.H.1-2 Box 16 Letter written by Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon to brother Jim [James Fulton McCutcheon, 2nd Iowa Infantry, Company H], 1862 November 20. Written in Nashville, Tennessee. Includes envelope. Laments that it has been 15 months since he’s seen a woman; discusses people at home; acknowledges the men’s spirits are low.
2007.67.I Box 16 Letter written by Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon to brother Jim [James Fulton McCutcheon, 2nd Iowa Infantry, Company H], 1862 December 18. Written in camp on Nolensville Pike five miles south of Nashville, Tennessee. Discusses men surrendering at Huntsville; discusses challenges to Union in East Tennessee.
2007.67.J Box 16 Letter written by Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon to brother Jim [James Fulton McCutcheon, 2nd Iowa Infantry, Company H], 1863 January 16. Written in Tennessee, Camp on Stones River. Describes Battle of Stones River at Murfreesboro; says there were 46 killed and 154 wounded; lists some casualties by name and nature of wound.
2007.67.K Box 16 Letter written by Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon to brother Jim [James Fulton McCutcheon, 2nd Iowa Infantry, Company H], 1863 April 28. Written in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Discusses scouting parties; recruits from convalescent camps; opinion of General Grant; opinion of the “negro matter.”
2007.67.L Box 16 Letter written by Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon to brother Jim [James Fulton McCutcheon, 2nd Iowa Infantry, Company H], [1863] July 7. Written [near Rienzi, Mississippi]. Discusses regiment at Rienzi with the 1st Missouri Regimental Battery; he is in suspense about matters at Richmond.
2007.67.M Box 16 Envelope sent by [Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon] to J.F. McCutcheon, Camp McLellan, Davenport, Iowa, 1863 July 22. Sent from Nashville, Tennessee.
2007.67.N Box 16 Envelope sent by [Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon] to J.F. McCutcheon Esq., Washington, Iowa, 1864 January 13. Sent from Nashville, Tennessee.
2007.67.O Box 16 Envelope sent by [Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon] to J.F. McCutcheon, Co. H, Second Iowa Volunteer Infantry, [illegible] Cairo Ill., 1862 July 16; stamped: received 1863 July 18. Sent from North Henderson, Illinois.
2007.67.P Box 16 Envelope sent by [Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon] to J.F. McCutcheon Esq., Washington, Iowa, [Illegible date]. Sent from Illinois.

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Series 11: Geza Mihalotzy, 24th Illinois Infantry, 1861-1864, undated

89.18.3 Box 9 Letter written by Geza Mihalotzy to General T.S. Mather, 1861 March 25. Written in Chicago, Illinois. Regarding equipment.
89.18.4 Box 9 Note written by R.G. Rutherford to Quartermaster McKay, 1861 May 18. Written in Cairo, Illinois (Camp Defiance). Requests transportation for rations.
89.18.6 Box 9 Grant of furlough written by J. Brandecker, 1861 November 1. Grant of furlough to Charles Neiderhauser, 24th Infantry, Illinois.
89.18.5 Box 9 Letter written by [illegible] to Colonel Geza Mihalotzy, 1861 November 15. Written in Louisville, Kentucky.
89.18.7 Box 9 Cover letter and medical certificate written by J.V. Horn to Colonel Geza Mihalotzy, 1862 January 18. Written in Louisville, Kentucky. Declares certain soldiers unfit for field duty, but fit to help in the hospital.
89.18.9 Box 9 Letter written by S. Peter Hammerich to Colonel Geza Mihalotzy, 1862 July 4. Written in Battle Creek, Michigan. Gives a report of the forage guard expedition on 1862 July 2-3.
89.18.10.A-B Box 9 Letter written by Samuel Smith to Colonel Geza Mihalotzy, 1862 July 6. Written in Battle Creek, Michigan. Tenders his resignation.
89.18.11 Box 9 Bill written by Robert Wetherwell to Colonel Geza Mihalotzy, 1862 August 9. Written in Chicago, Illinois.
89.18.12 Box 9 Certification written by Dr. Xavier Ritzinger, 1862 August 14. Written in Chicago, Illinois. Certification of doctor for release from duty for Albert Mauns. Notarized by Conrad Diehl.
89.18.13 Box 9 Note written by Albert Mauns to Colonel Geza Mihalotzy, 1862 August 24. Written in Chicago, Illinois. Tenders his resignation due to disability as certified in 89.18.12.
89.18.14 Box 9 Letter written by [Illegible - C. Vocke ?] to Colonel Geza Mihalotzy, 1862 September 11. Written in camp near Bowling Green, Kentucky. Regards charges brought against him by another lieutenant.
89.18.21 Box 9 Note written by unknown author, 1863 January. Written in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Discusses wounded furlough time.
89.18.15 Box 9 Receipt written by Charles H. Randall to Colonel Geza Mihalotzy, 1863 February 25. Written in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Receipt for weapons.
89.18.16 Box 9 Document written by Henry Wendt to Colonel Geza Mihalotzy, 1863 March 6. Written in camp near Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Document certifying his inability to furnish any forage for February 1863.
89.18.17 Box 9 Receipt written by Jacob Poull to Colonel Geza Mihalotzy, 1863 March 31. Written Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Receipt for weapons and equipment.
89.18.18 Box 9 Receipt written by William Vocke to Colonel Geza Mihalotzy, 1863 May 6. Written in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Receipt for $39.00 - forfeited three months' pay for one of his company's soldiers.
89.18.22 Box 9 Note written by Levi P. Holden, 88th Illinois Infantry, 1863 November 14. Written in Nelson County, Kentucky (Camp Lytle). Discusses receipt of letter and package.
89.18.23 Box 9 Note written by Edward E. Babcock, 88th Illinois Infantry, 1863 November 14. Written in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Discusses receipt of letter.
89.18.24 Box 9 Certification written by Geza Mihalotzy, 1863 December 24. Written in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Certification about not being able to furnish proper vouchers due to capture and burning of wagon storing these records. Includes witness vouching by H. Koch and W.J. Vance.
89.18.25 Box 9 Special Order No. 73 written by Geza Mihalotzy, 1863 December 26. Written in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Quarter Master Seargant Henry Wendt is to furnish a duplicate invoice for a horse.
89.18.26 Box 9 Letter written by H.G. Keefer to T.S. Bowers, 1864 January 2. Written in Bowling Green, Kentucky (U.S. General Hospital). Requests a descriptive list and account of pay and clothing for soldier Henry Dietze, 24th Illinois.
89.18.27 Box 9 Notice written by George Balchel to Colonel Geza Mihalotzy, 1864 January 21. Written in Washington, D.C. Notice that fourth quarter 1861 stores were examined and have been sent to the Second Auditor because no vouchers were furnished along with the records.
89.18.28 Box 9 Letter written by Geza Mihalotzy to E.B. French, 2nd Auditor, 1864 February 7. Written in Chattanooga, Tennessee. [See also 89.18.27.] Explains that he is furnishing certified invoices because the originals burned.
89.18.29 Box 9 Letter written by Joseph Kiss to Colonel Geza Mihalotzy, 1864 February 29. Written in Springfield, Illinois (Camp Butler). [Written in German?]
89.18.30 Box 9 Letter written by Ludwig Toser to Colonel Geza Mihalotzy, 1864 February 22. Written in Nashville, Tennessee (Hospital near). [Written in German?]
89.18.31 Box 9 Telegraph written by Henry Wendt to Mrs. Hannah Mihalotzy, 1864 February 26. Written in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Informs her that her husband was fatally wounded and she should come see him immediately.
89.18.32.A-B Box 9 Letter written by Edward Bornemann to Mrs. Hannah Mihalotzy, 1864 March 15. Written in Tyner's Station, Tennessee. Includes copies of resolutions passed by officers honoring her recently deceased husband.
89.18.19 Box 9 Receipt written by G. Rascher to Colonel Geza Mihalotzy, 1864 March 18. Written in Tyner's Station, Tennessee. Receipt for whiskey and cigars for Lieutenant H. Wendt.
89.18.20 Box 9 Letter written by Friedrich Kringke to Colonel Geza Mihalotzy, 1863 July 24. Written in Washington, D.C. From member of regimental band. Letter describes how he was captured and held by the Confederates for a while and was then released through a prisoner exchange. He received medical treatment and has been at a distribution camp for months with the promise of returning to his regiment. He asks his Colonel to request his return so as to speed up the process.
89.18.1 Box 9 Note written by L.M. Turchin to Colonel Geza Mihalotzy, undated.
89.18.2 Box 9 Note written by Chas. T. Larner to Colonel Geza Mihalotzy, undated. Regarding officers discharged from his regiment.

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Series 12: David W. Morris, 126th Illinois Infantry, Company H, 1862-1867

2007.68.II Box 16 Letter written by Charles B. Stone to Mr. H.H. Stone, Concord, Lake County, Ohio, 1861 August 22. Written in Fort Runger, Virginia. Includes envelope. To: "Dear Parents & Brothers."
2007.68.A Box 16 Letter written by F.D. Curtis [?] to "Friend Brown," 1862 May 29. Written in Washington, D.C.
2007.68.B Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1862 September 3. Written in Camp Dixon, Illinois.
2007.68.C Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1862 October 1. Written in Chicago, Illinois (Camp Douglas).
2007.68.D Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1862 November 26. Written in Bolivar, Tennessee.
2007.68.E Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1863 January 5. Written in Humboldt, Tennessee.
2007.68.F Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1863 January 25. Written in Humboldt, Tennessee.
2007.68.G Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to [Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois], 1863 February 10. Written in Humboldt, Tennessee.
2007.68.H Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1863 April 7. Written in camp near Jackson, Tennessee.
2007.68.I Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1863 May 6. Written in Johnson Mills, Tennessee (near Jackson).
2007.68.J Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1863 July 22. Written in Haynes Bluff, rear of Vicksburg, Mississippi.
2007.68.K Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to [Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois], 1863 September 6. Written in DeValls Bluff, Arkansas.
2007.68.L Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to [Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois], 1863 October 20. Written in Little Rock, Arkansas.
2007.68.M Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1863 November 26. Written in DeValls Bluff, Arkansas.
2007.68.N Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1864 January 1. Written in Devalls Bluff, Arkansas.
2007.68.O Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1864 March 7. Written in DeValls Bluff, Arkansas.
2007.68.P Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1864 April 9. Written in DeValls Bluff, Arkansas.
2007.68.Q Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1864 May 5. Written in DeValls Bluff, Arkansas.
2007.68.R Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to [Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois], 1864 June 5. Written in DeValls Bluff, Arkansas.
2007.68.S Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1864 July 12. Written in DeValls Bluff, Arkansas.
2007.68.T Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1864 September 12. Written in Pine Bluff, Arkansas.
2007.68.U Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1864 November 1. Written in Pine Bluff, Arkansas.
2007.68.V Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1864 December 5. Written in Pine Bluff, Arkansas.
2007.68.W Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1864 December 24. Written in Pine Bluff, Arkansas.
2007.68.X Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1865 March 5. Written in Little Rock, Arkansas.
2007.68.Y Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to parents, 1865 March 11. Written in Little Rock, Arkansas.
2007.68.Z.A-B Box 16 Letter written by Emma Jo Humphrey to cousin Cynthia Coe, Dunlapsville, Union Co, Indiana, 1865 March 23. Written in Rochester, Illinois. Includes envelope.
2007.68.AA Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1865 April 23. Written in Saint Charles, Arkansas.
2007.68.BB Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1865 May 30. Written in Arkansas (Mouth White River).
2007.68.CC.A-B Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1865 September 30. Written in Emporia, Kansas.
2007.68.DD Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1865 December 24. Written in Little Stranger, Kansas.
2007.68.EE Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1866 February 27. Written in Emporia, Kansas.
2007.68.FF Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1866 April 24. Written in Emporia, Kansas.
2007.68.GG Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1866 August 29. Written in Coal Creek "Farm," Lyon County, Kansas.
2007.68.HH Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1867 February 23. Sent from Ridgeway P.O., Osage County, Kansas.
2007.68.JJ Box 16 Letter written by David W. Morris to Mary Thomas, Coal Valley, Rock Island County, Illinois, 1867 February 10. Sent from Ridgeway P.O., Osage County, Kansas. [Photocopy.]
2007.68.KK Box 16 Typescript of diary written by David W. Morris, 1867 April 27-1867 May 26. “(This is a copy of a diary that Dad kept from the time he left Emporia, [Kansas] in the Spring of 1867 to go to Coal Valley, [Illinois] to marry Mother. - Warren)”

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Series 13: Annie F. Noble (Otis M. Moody, Company K, 51st Illinois Infantry, Headquarters detachment), 1852-1905, undated

2007.66.A Box 15 Letter written by Ellen to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1852 August 19. Written in New York.
2007.66.B Box 15 Letter written by Otis M. Moody to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1858 June 25. Written in Chicago, Illinois.
2007.66.C.1-2 Box 15 Letter written by Otis M. Moody to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1859 December 27. Written in Chicago, Illinois.
2007.66.D.1-3 Box 15 Letter written by Otis M. Moody to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1860 February 14. Written in Chicago, Illinois.
2007.66.E Box 15 Letter written by Otis M. Moody to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1860 March 13. Written in Chicago, Illinois.
2007.66.F Box 15 Letter written by Otis M. Moody to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1860 March 23. Written in Chicago, Illinois.
2007.66.G Box 15 Letter written by Otis M. Moody to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1860 October 19. Written in Lake Forest, Illinois.
2007.66.BB Box 15 Letter written by [illegible] to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1861 February 10. Difficult to read.
2007.66.H.1-2 Box 15 Letter written by Otis M. Moody to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1861 April 29. Written in Chicago, Illinois. Includes envelope.
2007.66.I.1-2 Box 15 Letter written by Otis M. Moody to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1861 May 6. Written in Chicago, Illinois.
2007.66.J.1-2 Box 15 Letter written by Otis M. Moody to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1861 May 13. Written in Chicago, Illinois.
2007.66.K.1-2 Box 15 Letter written by Martin to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1861 June 5. Written in Wilmington, North Carolina.
2007.66.L.1-2 Box 15 Letter written by Otis M. Moody to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1862 June 28-29. Written in Corinth, Mississippi (near Camp Big Springs). Includes envelope.
2007.66.M Box 15 Letter written by Otis M. Moody to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1862 August 12. Written on Memphis & Charleston Railroad, near Decatur, Alabama. Discusses novel Shirley by Charlotte Brontë, as well as camp and soldier life.
2007.66.N Box 15 Letter written by [Louis?] to George, 1862 November 13. Written in Minden, Louisiana (Camp Allen).
2007.66.O.1-2 Box 15 Letter written by Otis M. Moody to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1862 November 15-16. Written in Nashville, Tennessee. Includes envelope.
2007.66.P Box 15 Letter written by Hannah to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1862 November 18. Written at "Home."
2007.66.Q.1-5 Box 15 Letter written by Otis M. Moody to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1862 November 24. Written on picket guard near Nashville, Tennessee.
2007.66.R Box 15 Letter written by Anna Southwick to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1863 [no month listed].
2007.66.S Box 15 Letter written by Otis M. Moody to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1863 March 23. Written in Camp Schaeffer, near Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Otis writes on his birthday about a visit and inspection from numerous generals and officers, as well as generals' wives. He is pleased because General Rosecrans declares theirs the best Division in his Army. Describes the ceremony and review. Reflects on turning 33 and having met Annie only 8 years earlier.
2007.66.T Box 15 Letter written by Pat to "Friend Reynolds," 1863 October 6. Written in [Cascadia?].
2007.66.U.1-2 Box 16 Letter written by L.P. Bradley to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1863 December 24. Written in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Discusses how much he misses their mutual friend Otis Moody and describes the circumstances under which he died in battle in September 1863.
2007.66.V Box 16 Letter written by [illegible – a doctor] to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1864 May 5. Written in Bowling Green, Kentucky. Likely same author as 2007.66.X.1-2
2007.66.W Box 16 Letter written by Annie F. Noble to Captain Moore, 1864 September 24. Written at 277 Adelphi Street [New York].
2007.66.X.1-2 Box 16 Letter written by [illegible – a doctor] to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1864 November 3. Written in Deckerd, Tennessee. Likely same author as 2007.66.V
2007.66.Y.1-2 Box 16 Letter written by Isaac S. Signor, County Judge & Surrogate, Orleans County, Albion, New York to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, 1887 December 3. Written in Albion, New York.
2007.66.Z Box 16 School assignment by Margaret Buffun, 1905 February 22. About George Washington.
2007.66.AA Box 16 Letter written by P. Anstruther [?] to Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York, undated.
2007.66.CC Box 16 Partial letter written by Otis M. Moody to [Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York], undated. Seems to be missing page[s]. Presumably written to Annie.
2007.66.DD Box 16 Partial letter written by Otis M. Moody to [Annie F. Noble, Brooklyn, New York], undated. Seems to be missing page[s]. Presumably written to Annie.

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Series 14: E.N. Palley, Army of the Potomac, 1862-1863

89.20.4 Box 9 Letter written by E.N. Palley to "My Dear Wife and Children," 1862 November 11. Written in camp near Warrenton, Virginia. Includes partial transcription. He writes about long, hard marches and wishes he had not come to the war. He goes on to write of family matters.
89.20.1 Box 9 Letter written by E.N. Palley to "My Dear Wife," 1863 March 18. Written in camp near Falmouth, Virginia. Includes partial transcription. Writes disparagingly of a Dr. Hull whom Palley felt was not helpful to him when Palley was ill while they were under heavy fire for days. He goes on to write of family matters.
89.20.2 Box 9 Letter written by E.N. Palley to "My Dear Wife and Children," 1863 March 19. Written in camp near Falmouth, Virginia. Includes partial transcription. Writes while the “cannons are roaring in every direction.” Bemoans the war and wishes to come home. He goes on to write of family matters.
89.20.3 Box 9 Letter written by E.N. Palley to "My Dear Wife and Children," 1863 June 8. Written in United States Yard. Includes partial transcription. Writes about overnight marches and lack of knowledge about destinations. He constantly hears guns and cannons. He also discusses their food. He goes on to write of family matters.

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Series 15: R.D. Parker, Civilian, 1896-1901

90.15.1 Box 11 Letter written by John H. Thompson, Confederate Artillery Captain to General E.A. Carmen, 1896 April 9. Written in Portsmouth, Virginia. Discusses Grimes Battery at Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862. Includes a mini map with Grimes’s location marked in red. Includes transcription.
90.15.2 Box 11 Letter written by Frank Higbee, New York Infantry, Company B to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1899 August 9. Written in Downers Grove, Illinois. Discusses military positions during Civil War. Includes transcription.
90.15.3 Box 11 Map with notations by [Frank Higbee, New York Infantry, Company B], written to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1899 August 9. Written in Downers Grove, Illinois.
90.15.4 Box 11 Letter written by Thomas Ellett, Grand Camp Confederate Veterans, Virginia Department to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1899 November 2. Written in Richmond, Virginia. Requests obtaining a roster of the Society of the Association of Northern Virginia.
90.15.5 Box 11 Letter written by R.T. Bennett, Former Colonel 14th North Carolina to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1899 November 15. Written in Wadesboro, North Carolina. Discusses Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862.
90.15.6 Box 11 Letter written by Walter Clark, 35th North Carolina to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1899 November 27. Written in Raleigh, North Carolina. Discusses particular movements and sequence of events of Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862. Includes transcription.
90.15.7 Box 11 Letter written by D.H. Hurth, Major, 2nd North Carolina State Troops to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1899 November 27. Written in Goldsboro, North Carolina. Discusses the position of the 2nd North Carolina State Troops at Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862. Includes transcription.
90.15.17.2 Box 11 Map by Z. Abney, Captain, 11th Alabama, Company I to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1899 November 28. Written in Prattville, Alabama. Map of the Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862.
90.15.8 Box 11 Letter written by F.M. Parker, Lieutenant Colonel, 30th North Carolina to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1899 November 30. Written in Empire [?], North Carolina. Discusses particular movements and sequence of events of Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862.
90.15.9 Box 11 Letter written by Z. Abney, Captain, 11th Alabama, Company I to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1899 December 8. Written in Prattville, Alabama. Discusses Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862 and Wilcox Brigade. Includes transcription.
90.15.10 Box 11 Letter written by H.L. Stevenson, Private, 10th Alabama to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1899 December 9. Written in Jacksonville, Alabama. Discusses the Wilcox Brigade at Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862. Includes names and addresses of some of the members of the 8th, 10th, 11th, and 13th Alabama regiments. Includes transcription.
90.15.11 Box 11 Letter written by Ward V. Houghton, 2nd Georgia to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1899 December 9. Written in Birmingham, Alabama. Discusses the Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862 and Rodes and Wilcox Brigades.
90.15.12 Box 11 Letter written by A. Jackson, 6th Alabama, Company E to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1899 December 10. Written in Spring Hill, Alabama. Discusses the 6th Alabama. Includes transcription.
90.15.13 Box 11 Letter written by A.L. Bennett, Watkins Mercantile and Banking Company to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1899 December 11. Written in Faunsdale, Alabama. Discusses Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862 and Rhodes [sic] Brigade.
90.15.14.A-B Box 11 Letter written by Vines E. Turner, 23rd North Carolina Infantry to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1899 December 11. Written in Raleigh, North Carolina. Discusses Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862. Includes transcription.
90.15.15 Box 11 Letter written by J.B. Hughes, 11th Alabama Infantry, Company J to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1899 December 11. Written in Jasper, Alabama. Discusses Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862. Includes transcription.
90.15.16 Box 11 Letter written by Samuel J. Jones, 6th Alabama, Company G to Adjutant General H.H. Brandon of Montgomery, Alabama, 1899 December 16. Written in Autaugaville, Alabama. Discusses request of R.D. Parker of Downers Grove for information about the Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862.
90.15.18 Box 11 Letter written by W.L. Fagan, 8th Alabama, Company K, Wilcox Brigade, R.H. Anderson Division to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1899 December 20. Written in Havana, Alabama. Discusses the Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862. Includes transcription.
90.15.17.1 Box 11 Letter written by Z. Abney, Captain, 11th Alabama, Company I to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1899 December 22. Written in Prattville, Alabama. Discusses the Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862.
90.15.19 Box 11 Letter written by A. Jackson, 6th Alabama, Company E to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1899 December 27. Written in Spring Hill, Alabama. Discusses the Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862. Includes transcription.
90.15.20 Box 11 Letter written by James C. MacRae, 5th North Carolina to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1900 January 1. Written in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Discusses the Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862.
90.15.21 Box 11 Letter written by P.H. Fry, County Clerk of Orange County, Virginia to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1900 January 8. Written in Orange County, Virginia. Informs Parker that they don't have a map of the area noting property owners before and during the Civil War. Directs him to elderly citizens who fought in the Confederate Army for assistance.
90.15.22 Box 11 Letter written by Edward S. Marsh, 4th North Carolina State Troops, Company I to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1900 January 16. Written in Bellhaven, North Carolina. Discusses his wounds that he received in the Battle of Chancellorsville on May 3, 1863. Includes transcription.
90.15.23 Box 11 Letter written by A. Jackson, 6th Alabama, Company E to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1900 January 20. Written in Spring Hill, Alabama. Discusses the Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862.
90.15.24 Box 11 Letter written by J.B. Hughes, 11th Alabama Infantry, Company J to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1900 January 31. Written in Jasper, Alabama. Discusses Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862.
90.15.25 Box 11 Letter written by William Woodward Brandon, Alabama, Office Adjutant General to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1900 February 13. Written in Montgomery, Alabama. Includes a short biography.
90.15.26 Box 11 Letter written by Francis P. Fleming, Attorney to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1900 February 24. Written in Jacksonville, Florida. Discusses the Florida Infantry in the Civil War.
90.15.27 Box 11 Letter written by J.B. Hughes, 11th Alabama Infantry, Company J to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1900 February 25. Written in Jasper, Alabama. Discusses Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland (Antietam) on September 17, 1862.
90.15.28 Box 11 Letter written by P.A. Klipstein, Marshall Chemical Co. to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1900 March 1. Written in Marshall, Virginia. Discusses a map of Fauquier County, Virginia and roads and movements of various military units in the County during the Civil War.
90.15.29 Box 11 Letter written by James Aikeer to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1900 December 29. Written in Gadsden, Alabama. Discusses how he didn't fight in the battles at Sharpsburg (Antietam) and Gettysburg because he was wounded at the earlier Battle of Seven Pines.
90.15.30 Box 11 Letter written by William G. Britton, 5th Alabama, Company D to R.D. Parker of Downers Grove, Illinois, 1901 January 3. Written in Tunstall, Alabama. Discusses how he didn't fight at Sharpsburg because he was ill. Also describes wounds he received at other battles such as Chancellorsville.

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Series 16: Fitz-John Porter, General, 1869-1951

86.40.13 Box 8 Letter written by Fitz-John Porter to Sidney Webster, Esq., 1869 May 1. Written in New York, New York.
91.4.22 Box 12 Letter written by Fitz-John Porter to Col. Charles Marshall of Baltimore, 1869 June 11. Written in New York, New York. Discusses compiling reports and letters for published presentation in an appeal to the President. He hopes to get Marshall's permission to use one of Marshall's letters.
86.40.14 Box 8 Letter written by Fitz-John Porter to Hon. Edward S. Rollins, U.S. Senate, 1882 June 13. Written in Morristown, New Jersey.
92.57.1 Box 12 Letter written by Fitz-John Porter to Thomas Dimwork [Dimmork?], Esq., 1892 December 3. Written in New York, New York.
92.57.2 Box 12 Report, 1951 March 31. Written in Chicago, Illinois. "Report of the Fact-Finding Conference in the Case of General Fitz John Porter."

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Series 17: John W. Potter, 35th Indiana Infantry, Company B, 1865

73.2.1 Box 6 Letter written by John W. Potter to wife Mary, 1865 January 4. Written in Elktonville, Tennessee. In this letter, Potter recounts his frightening experiences during the Battle of Nashville and discusses his desire for the war to end.
73.2.2 Box 6 Letter written by John W. Potter to wife Mary, 1865 January 26. Written in Huntsville, Alabama.
73.2.3 Box 6 Letter written by John W. Potter to brother, 1865 February 21. Written in Huntsville, Alabama.
73.2.4 Box 6 Letter written by John W. Potter to wife Mary, 1865 March 6. Written in Pontoon, Bulls Gap, [Tennessee].
73.2.5 Box 6 Letter written by John W. Potter to wife Mary, 1865 March 14. Written in Huntsville, Alabama.
73.2.6 Box 6 Letter written by John W. Potter to wife Mary, 1865 March 19. Written in Huntsville, Alabama. In this letter, Potter complains about how isolated the soldiers are in camp, especially from news sources. He also discusses his company’s retreat from the Battle of Franklin, Tennessee.
73.2.7 Box 6 Letter written by John W. Potter to wife Mary, 1865 March 28. Written in Knoxville, Tennessee.
73.2.8 Box 6 Letter written by John W. Potter to wife Mary, 1865 April 10. Written in Bulls Gap, Tennessee.
73.2.9 Box 6 Letter written by John W. Potter to wife Mary, 1865 April 18. Written in Bulls Gap, Tennessee. Potter discusses the poverty of the civilians in Tennessee. He also writes of the mood in camp over the as-yet-unconfirmed rumors of Lincoln’s assassination.
73.2.10 Box 6 Letter written by John W. Potter to wife Mary, 1865 April 24. Written in Knoxville, Tennessee.
73.2.11 Box 6 Letter written by John W. Potter to wife Mary, 1865 May 13. Written in Nashville, Tennessee.
73.2.12 Box 6 Letter written by John W. Potter to wife Mary, 1865 May 30. Written in Nashville, Tennessee.
73.2.13 Box 6 Letter written by John W. Potter to uncle, 1865 May 31. Written in Nashville, Tennessee.
73.2.14 Box 6 Letter written by John W. Potter to wife Mary, 1865 July 2. Written in New Orleans, Louisiana.
73.2.15 Box 6 Letter written by John W. Potter to wife Mary, 1865 July 3. Written in New Orleans, Louisiana.
73.2.16 Box 6 Letter written by John W. Potter to wife Mary, 1865 July 12. Written in New Orleans, Louisiana.
73.2.17 Box 6 Letter written by John W. Potter to wife Mary, 1865 July 14. Written in New Orleans, Louisiana.

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Series 18: Richard Realf, 88th Illinois Infantry, 1861-1864, undated

72.1018 Box 4 Poem written by Richard Realf, 1861 April 23. “Apocalypse.” “Private Arthur Ladd, 6th Regt. Mass. Vols. First Martyr in War for liberty of 1861-5. Murdered, Baltimore, Md., April 19, 1861.” Private Ladd’s regiment was passing through Baltimore on its way to Washington when it was attacked by a secessionist mob. Ladd was killed. On the verso of the first page are eight lines of an unknown poem and the last fourteen lines of “Mollie” in Realf's hand, signed but undated.
72.547.A-B Box 3 Letter written by Richard Realf to Marian Gaines, 1862 August 25. Written in “Camp Fuller, Chicago, Illinois.” Signed "Volunteer."
72.1016 Box 4 Letter written by Richard Realf, 1863 November 3. Written in Chattanooga, Tennessee.
72.1014 Box 4 Letter written by Richard Realf to “My dear friends,” 1864 January 11. Written 25 miles east of Knoxville, Tennessee.
72.1013 Box 4 Letter written by Richard Realf, 1864 January 31.
72.544 Box 3 Letter written by Richard Realf to “My dear friend,” 1864 February 9. Written in Loudon, Tennessee. Realf expresses his admiration for the personal qualities and policies of President Abraham Lincoln.
72.548 Box 3 Letter written by Richard Realf to “My dear friend,” 1864 March 31. Written in Loudon, Tennessee. Supports Lincoln for re-election.
72.1015 Box 4 Letter written by Richard Realf, 1864 May 6. Written in Coosa [?] Springs, Georgia. This letter was written at the beginning of Sherman’s march through Georgia.
72.1019 Box 4 Letter written by Richard Realf to General William D. Whipple, 1864 September 17. Written in Atlanta, Georgia. In this letter, Realf seeks to apply to become an officer overseeing a black regiment. The letter includes endorsements from four commanding officers for Realf’s appointment.
72.1012 Box 4 Letter written by Richard Realf, 1864 November 13. Written in Pulaski, Tennessee.
72.1017 Box 4 Poem written by Richard Realf, undated. "A Soldier's Psalm to Woman."
89.12.10 Box 8 Poem written by Richard Realf, undated. "In Memory". Includes transcript.

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Series 19: William Starke Rosecrans, General, 1862-1863, 1907

72.443 Box 2 Letter written by William Starke Rosecrans to Mrs. F.P. Taylor, 1862 March 12. Written in Wheeling, Virginia. Thanks her for sending a bouquet.
72.406 Box 1 Dispatch written by C. Goddard to General G.D. Wagner [?], 1863 September 18. Written in Crawfish Springs, Georgia. Directs sending enclosure to General Burnside.
72.407.1 Box 1 Encoded dispatch written by William Starke Rosecrans to Major General Ambrose E. Burnside, 1863 September. Written in Chickamauga, Georgia.
72.407.2 Box 1 Translation of 1863 September encoded dispatch from W.S. Rosecrans to Major General A.E. Burnside. Translated by James McCarney, 1907 December 19.

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Series 20: Philip Henry Sheridan, General, 1872-1879, undated

72.828 Box 4 Autograph by Philip Henry Sheridan, 1879 January 22. Written in Chicago, Illinois.
86.40.16 Box 8 Letter written by Philip Henry Sheridan to “My dear Ord,” 1872 December 12. Written in Chicago, Illinois. Discusses Camp Douglas.
72.436 Box 2 Letter written by Philip Henry Sheridan to General McArthur, undated. Written in Chicago, Illinois [?]. Written on envelope addressed to General Sheridan, Army Headquarters, Chicago.

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Series 21: William T. Sherman, General, 1863-1874

72.397 Box 1 Letter written by William T. Sherman to General McArthur, 1863 June [?]. Written near Vicksburg, Mississippi.
72.402 Box 1 Letter written by William T. Sherman to General McArthur, 1863 July 2. Written in Camp on Bear Creek. Regarding the placement of gun batteries to protect troops moving down the Mississippi to take Vicksburg.
72.401 Box 1 Letter written by William T. Sherman to General McArthur, 1863 July 3. Written in camp near Vicksburg, Mississippi.
86.37 Box 8 Letter written by William T. Sherman to Gen. L. Thomas, 1864 July 24. Written near Atlanta, Georgia. Letter in secretary's hand with Sherman's signature. Discusses General James B. McPherson's death. Includes transcription.
72.392 Box 1 Letter written by William T. Sherman to Col. L.H. Whittlesy, 1867 September 27. Written in St. Louis, Missouri. 2nd sheet missing. This letter accompanies 100 of Sherman’s signatures made for the Soldier’s Fair in Chicago. Sherman states he is “always glad to aid such Fairs to the utmost of my ability.”
86.40.17 Box 8 Letter written by William T. Sherman to J.E. Williams, 1869 March 25. Written in Washington, D.C.
72.826 Box 4 Autograph by William T. Sherman, 1874 January 30. Written in Washington, D.C.

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Series 22: John Corson Smith, 96th Illinois Infantry, 1862-1865

2013.4.A Box 19 Diary written by John Corson Smith, 1862 August 9-1862 December 31
2013.4.B Box 19 Diary written by John Corson Smith, 1863 January 1-1863 December 31
2013.4.C Box 19 Diary written by John Corson Smith, 1864 January 1-1864 December 31. In June 1864, Corson was injured and had to leave the battle.
2013.4.D Box 19 Diary written by John Corson Smith, 1865 January 1-1865 October 12

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Series 23: John B. Spiller, 31st Illinois Infantry, Company C, 1862-1863

2008.11.1 Box 17 Letter written by John B. Spiller to wife Clarisa, 1862 October 16. Written in Springfield, Illinois (Camp Yates).
2008.11.2 Box 17 Letter written by John B. Spiller to wife Clarisa and children, 1862 October 24. Written in St. Louis, Missouri (Camp Jackson).
2008.11.3 Box 17 Letter written by John B. Spiller to wife Clarisa, 1862 October 26. Written in St. Louis, Missouri (Camp Jackson).
2008.11.4 Box 17 Letter written by John B. Spiller to wife Clarisa and children, 1862 November 10. Written in LaGrange, Tennessee.
2008.11.5 Box 17 Letter written by John B. Spiller to wife Clarisa, 1863 April 7. Written in Vista Plantation, Louisiana.
2008.11.6 Box 17 Letter written by John B. Spiller to wife Clarisa, 1863 April 15. Written in Vista Plantation, Louisiana.
2008.11.7 Box 17 Letter written by John B. Spiller to nephew; wife Clarisa, 1863 April 16. Written in Vista Plantation, Louisiana. Letter to nephew includes a note on the last page to his wife Clarisa regarding money he sent along.
2008.11.8 Box 17 Letter written by John B. Spiller to wife Clarisa and children, 1863 April 24. Written in Milliken's Bend, Louisiana.
2008.11.9 Box 17 Letter written by John B. Spiller to nephew; wife Clarisa, 1863 June 1. Written in Vicksburg, Mississippi. One letter with two messages: one to nephew and one to wife.

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Series 24: David S. Stanley, General, 1862-1864

92.2.4 Box 12 Letter written by David S. Stanley to Colonel H.G. Kennett, Chief of Staff of Mississippi, 1862 September 24. Written near Jacinto, Mississippi. This battle report describes movements, stores and activities of troops.
92.2.2 Box 12 Letter written by David S. Stanley to Mrs. Ames Binney of Baltimore, 1864 April 4. Written in Blue Springs, Tennessee. States he has no official papers to contribute to Mrs. Ames's album to raise money for a sanitary fair. He will ask his wife to check his papers at home.
92.2.3 Box 12 Letter written by Mrs. Stanley to Mrs. Ames Binney of Baltimore, 1864 April 13. Written in Yellow Springs, Ohio. Describes accompanying battle report (92.2.4) that she sends to fulfill request for his official papers.

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Series 25: Jonathan Stewart, 74th Illinois Infantry, Company I, 1863-1865

2007.72 Box 16 Diary written by Jonathan Stewart, 1863 May 1-December 1. Entries include commentary on the weather, evidence of his being a devout Christian, of his injury or illness and recovery, of the mail he wrote and received from his wife and daughters, the price and purchase of eggs and his becoming a Mason. At the beginning of the diary is a list titled “Statistics” that discusses subjects like world population and the population of each race. These “statistics” are followed by a listing of various dates and famous people who died in those years.
2008.4 Box 17 Diary written by Jonathan Stewart, 1865 January 1-April 28. These entries continue to comment on the weather and his incoming and outgoing mail. He frequently mentions sending the Washington Chronicle to his wife and Waverly Magazine and Godey’s Lady’s Book to his daughter Ida. He also discusses his duties as guard at the Carroll and Old Capitol prisons. He mentions attending Lincoln’s second inauguration. He also mentions hearing news of Johnston’s surrender to Sherman.

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Series 26: Flora Weaver, 1862-1865, undated

2008.1.A Box 17 Letter written by John S. Pickard; John M. Latheon [?], 67th Illinois Regiment, Company H to Flora A. Weaver, Lena, Stephenson County, Illinois, 1862 June 22. Written in Chicago, Illinois (Camp Douglas). Written on letterhead with a graphic and verse, “The Girl I left Behind Me.” Also contains note from John M. Latheon at the end. Discusses how he read Flora’s last letter repeatedly; there are many rules at camp; some soldiers and women exchange photographs.
2008.1.B Box 17 Letter written by John S. Pickard, 67th Illinois Regiment, Company H to Flora A. Weaver, Lena, Stephenson Co., Illinois, 1862 August 12. Written in Chicago, Illinois (Camp Douglas). Discusses how many men enlist at Lena, Illinois; some soldiers sick with typhoid; he sees Eugene Way every day.
2008.1.C.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by John S. Pickard, 67th Illinois Regiment, Company H to Flora A. Weaver, Lena, Stephenson Co., Illinois, 1862 August 22. Written in Chicago, Illinois (Camp Douglas). Includes envelope. Discusses how he hasn’t had any money for four weeks and that he is contemplating quitting.
2008.1.D Box 17 Letter written by Eugene Way, 72nd Illinois Regiment, Company H to Flora A. Weaver, Lena, Stephenson Co., Illinois, 1862 October 1. Written in Columbus, Kentucky. Discusses how four companies of his regiment left three days ago going downriver and asks if a regiment left Rockford recently.
2008.1.E Box 17 Letter written by F. Wait, 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Corps to Flora A. Weaver, Lena, Stephenson Co., Illinois, 1864 June 20. Written in Headquarters, 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Corps [near Petersburg, Virginia]. Discusses how they’ve been under fire most of the time for four weeks; there have been false reports that Union has taken the city; ink is scarce; signs “Brother F. Wait.”
2008.1.F Box 17 Letter written by George S. Roush, 46th Illinois, Company B to Flora A. Weaver, Lena, Stephenson Co., Illinois, 1864 August 19. Written in Morganza, Louisiana. States that he hasn’t received a letter from Flora for more than a month; requests a photograph for his album; is situated 200 miles south of Vicksburg; expects their colonel to receive a general commission.
2008.1.G.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by Denison J. Griffing, 67th Illinois Regiment, Company H to Flora A. Weaver, Lena, Stephenson Co., Illinois, 1864 September 24. Written in Camp Burnside [Kentucky?]. Includes envelope. Has "Mr. Denison J. Griffing" written on the front, and "Mr. George S. Roush" on the back. Postmarked Indianapolis, Indiana. Mentions the death of Euguene Way; states that he received the photograph she sent; discusses the draft, substitutes cost up to $2400.
2008.1.H.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by Denison J. Griffing, 67th Illinois Regiment, Company H to Flora A. Weaver, Lena, Stephenson Co., Illinois, 1864 October 17. Written in Camp Burnside [Kentucky?]. Includes envelope addressed. Discusses how soldiers have been building new barracks for the regiment; states that he is lonely and talks about parties at home.
2008.1.I Box 17 Letter written by Denison J. Griffing, 67th Illinois Regiment, Company H to Flora A. Weaver, Lena, Stephenson Co., Illinois, 1864 December 9. Written in Camp Burnside [Kentucky?]. Asks about people at home; asks about Mr. Way’s parents.
2008.1.J.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by D.E. Rice, 14th Illinois Cavalry, Company I to Flora A. Weaver, Lena, Stephenson Co., Illinois, 1865 January 27. Written in Camp Smith, Nashville, Tennessee. Includes envelope. Discusses tearing down the buildings at Camp Smith to move them to Edgefield; drawing double rations; mentions Charles Haggart and Captain Baeke.
2008.1.K Box 17 Letter written by George S. Roush, 46th Illinois, Company B to Flora A. Weaver, Lena, Stephenson Co., Illinois, 1865 March 30. Written in Camp in the field, Alabama. States their march to Mobile ended; working at Spanish Fort 12 to 15 miles from Mobile on the Bay; on bridge building duty the previous week; they have the enemy surrounded on land; Union gunboats trying to cross, one sunk by torpedo; Confederates charged last night, repulsed by 50th Indiana Regiment; has frequent picket duty; captain is sick so Roush is in command.
2008.1.L.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by George S. Roush, 46th Illinois, Company B to Flora A. Weaver, Lena, Stephenson Co., Illinois, 1865 May 22. Written in Macon, Mississippi. Includes envelope. States that company is 200 miles from Mobile; it is guarding government property; many young ladies in the town offering invitations; many paroled Confederate soldiers in town who are friendly; arrived in Mobile, Alabama on May 24 and go to Texas soon.
2008.1.M Box 17 Envelope sent to Flora A. Weaver, Lena, Stephenson Co., Illinois, undated. Sent from Indianapolis, Indiana.
2008.1.N Box 17 Envelope sent to Flora A. Weaver, Lena, Stephenson Co., Illinois, [Illegible date].

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Series 27: James M. Welch, 16th Illinois Infantry, Company D, 1862-1865

2008.12.1 Box 17 Diary written by James M. Welch, 1862 April 22-1862 December 25; 1865 January 1-1865 January 3. Accounts of engagements at Farmington, Mississippi on May 3 and 9, 1862. Entries written in Hamburg, Tennessee, in camp by a swamp in Mississippi, in Farmington, Mississippi, on the march to Corinth and in Boonville, Mississippi.
2008.12.2 Box 17 Diary written by James M. Welch, 1865 February 22 - 1865 June 30. Accounts of battles at Averasboro and Bentonville, North Carolina.

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Series 28: William R. Wilder, 9th Illinois Cavalry, Company F, 1862-1865

2008.3.A Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to brother Frank J. Wilder, North Scituate, Rhode Island, 1862 April 12. Written in Pattersonville, Missouri. States that they left Camp Douglas for St. Louis on 19 February 1862. A week later left for Pilot Knob. Then on to Black River. Then to Pattersonville. Complains of an unnamed Captain in Company F. Mentions brother Asaph, Harriet, Cousin Warren, Uncle Charles.
2008.3.B.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to brother Frank J. Wilder, North Scituate, Rhode Island, 1862 May 23. Written in Pattersonville, [Missouri]. Includes envelope. Tells story of enlistment. Identifies his captain as Bernard A. Stampoffski, and repeats his criticisms of the first letter and gives details of the captain's arrest. He likes the company and the other officers.
2008.3.U.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by Frank J. Wilder [brother], Rhode Island 12th, Company A to uncle Charles M. Wescott, North Scituate, Rhode Island, 1862 October 25. Written in Washington, D.C. Includes envelope.
2008.3.C.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to aunt Mary A. White, Butler, Illinois, 1863 June 5. Written in Germantown, Tennessee. Includes envelope. States that he was in the hospital for twenty days with typhoid fever but has recovered. He spent a month in the hospital in May-June of 1862, and was rescued by his father, who came and arranged a furlough home on 26 June 1862 through Christmas. Discusses enlistment, and difficulty with mail to and from his brother Frank, who has since enlisted and died.
2008.3.D.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to aunt Mary A. White, Butler, Illinois, 1863 June 21. Written in Germantown, Tennessee. Includes envelope. States he has plenty of food, is recovering and has light duty. Apparently he was made sick from eating very sour cherries. He likes his company and his officers. He believes the cavalry has the hardest job.
2008.3.E.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to grandmother Lydia I. Wescott, North Scituate, Rhode Island, 1863 July 27. Written in Germantown, Tennessee. Includes envelope. States that he has recovered and has light guard duty once a week.
2008.3.F.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to aunt Mary A.W. White, Butler, Illinois, 1863 September 5. Written in LaGrange, Tennessee. Includes envelope. Describes a raid and skirmish, August 13-22, at Granada, Tennessee where they destroyed railroad equipment and captured provisions. Both railroad bridges over the Yalabusha River were burnt by the enemy. He mentions the presence of "negro regiments" and the rumor of the regiment being mustered out next June.
2008.3.G.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to aunt Mary A.W. White, Butler, Montgomery County Illinois, 1863 November 25. Written in Colliersville, Tennessee. Includes envelope. States that he received a box.
2008.3.H.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to aunt Mary A.W. White, Butler, Montgomery County Illinois, 1863 December 21. Written in Colliersville, Tennessee. Includes envelope. Describes his officers. States that most of the company has re-enlisted for veterans, but he will not. Passes his respects to Uncle Jacob.
2008.3.I.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to aunt Mary A.W. White, Butler, Montgomery County Illinois, 1864 January 28. Written in Colliersville, Tennessee. Includes envelope. Says his father advises he re-enlist, but he expects the war to end in the spring campaign, though he expects guerilla warfare to continue, requiring veterans, or re-enlistees, to remain in the field.
2008.3.J.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to aunt Mary A.W. White, Butler, Montgomery County Illinois, 1864 February 6. Written in Germantown, Tennessee. Includes envelope. States that he did not re-enlist.
2008.3.K.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to aunt Mary A.W. White, Butler, Montgomery County Illinois, 1864 May 18. Written in camp near Memphis, Tennessee. Includes envelope. States that his regiment was reviewed by General Grierson.
2008.3.L.1-4 Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to aunt Mary A.W. White, Butler, Montgomery County Illinois, 1864 July 23. Written in camp near Memphis, Tennessee. Includes envelope. Gives a long account of a 26 day skirmish and states that he received his photograph.
2008.3.M.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to aunt Mary A.W. White, Butler, Montgomery County Illinois, 1864 August 17. Written in camp at Colliersville, Tennessee. Includes envelope. States that many regimental comrades were wounded and one killed near Oxford a day or two ago. Abby in Rhode Island has written with fears that he has been wounded. Mentions he likes being a bugler, although Abby wrote that she thought he should not accept the position.
2008.3.N.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to aunt Mary A.W. White, Butler, Montgomery County Illinois, 1864 September 29. Written in camp at White Station, Tennessee. Includes envelope. States that he’s now out of the hospital. A salute was fired in honor of Sheridan's victory over Early. Expects the war to end with the year. Rebel deserters arrive in camp "most every day." The hospital now "gets sanitary supplies." Copperhead papers are prohibited from going to the soldiers.
2008.3.O.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to aunt Mary A.W. White, Butler, Montgomery County Illinois, 1864 December 4. Written in camp at Nashville, Tennessee. Includes envelope. States he has been to Alabama and retreated back to Nashville in front of Hood. The regiment saved General Hatch from capture. His orderly sergeant and another were killed. Hood is determined to take the North but cannot. There are 9l Union cavalry regiments present and an unknown number of infantry.
2008.3.P.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to aunt Mary A.W. White, Butler, Montgomery County Illinois, 1865 February 16. Written in camp at Eastport, Mississippi. Includes envelope. He states that they are out of the wilderness now and discusses how he practices the bugle twice a day on top of playing at roll call four times a day.
2008.3.Q.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to aunt Mary A.W. White, Butler, Montgomery County Illinois, 1865 March 22. Written in camp at Eastport, Mississippi. Includes envelope. States that they bury “five or six most every day” who have died from diarrhea.
2008.3.R.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to aunt Mary A.W. White, Butler, Montgomery County Illinois, 1865 April 19. Written in camp at Eastport, Mississippi. Includes envelope. Discusses learning of Lincoln’s assassination, though he does not believe it is true. Confederate soldiers and refugees come into camp every day.
2008.3.S.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to aunt Mary A.W. White, Butler, Montgomery County Illinois, 1865 September 20. Written in camp in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Includes envelope. States that since they were paid, many men have deserted, “taking their horses and arms with them.”
2008.3.T.1-2 Box 17 Letter written by William R. Wilder to aunt Mary A.W. White, Butler, Montgomery County Illinois, 1865 October 30. Written in camp in Selma, Alabama. Includes envelope. States that he is sick with ague, fever and shakes. Expects to be in Springfield in about two weeks.

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Series 29: General Letters, 1847-1924, undated, bulk 1861-1865

72.112 Box 1 Letter written by John G. Bragg to “My Dear Sergeant Mc,” undated. Thanks him for the photograph.
72.479 Box 2 Letter written by Benjamin F. Butler, General, Department of the Gulf to General M.J. Thompson, 1862 September 17. Written in New Orleans, Louisiana. Includes typed transcription.

2007.62.A.1-2

2007.62.B.1-4

Box 15 Letter written by Mrs. John M. Chilton to Confederate General Daniel Ruggles, 1862 May 2. Written in Clinton, Hinds County, Mississippi. Includes copy of letter from Mrs. Shepherd Brown of New Orleans, sister of Mrs. Chilton. Mrs. Brown implores Ruggles to help her nephew who is talented and dedicated but sickly. She asks the general to find him a post that will allow him to contribute while remaining in good health. Mrs. Chilton follows up with her own comments about the city of New Orleans and how it has fared during the war. 2007.62.B is an annotated transcription of Mrs. Chilton and Mrs. Brown’s letters.
2009.7.1 Box 18 Letter written by Albert H. Colby, 92nd Illinois Infantry, Company A to brother Leonard, 1864 March 31. Written in Chicago, Illinois (Camp Douglas). Discusses getting to know Chicago and enjoying meeting women there. Bemoans lack of money.
86.40.12 Box 8 Letter written by A.M. Davis to brother, [1863] July 19. Written in Brooklyn, New York. Ms. Davis writes her brother of home life and possibly draft riots in New York City.
72.535 Box 3 Letter written by William Dennison, Governor of Ohio to General B. Wright, 1861 November 4. Written in Columbus, Ohio. Requests assistance for Hugh Cole as he travels to recover the body of his son, killed in battle.
89.1.1 Box 8 Letter written by Abner Doubleday, 1st Division, 1st Corps, Brigadier General to C.B. Comstock, Chief Engineer, Army of the Potomac, 1862 December 4. Includes transcript and sketches. Gives description of Ely’s Ford above Falmouth, Virginia. This letter from Doubleday to Comstock offers intelligence information about Ely’s Ford, near Fredericksburg. The communication was received shortly before the Battle of Fredericksburg, 13 December 1863, in which Union forces were defeated. Doubleday was stationed at Fort Sumter in 1861 and commanded the artillery unit which first fired on the Confederates. He saw action in Second Bull Run, Antietam and Gettysburg, as well as Fredericksburg. He retired from the army in 1873, and is regarded by some to have invented baseball.
72.552 Box 3 Letter written by Charles E. Emery, 3rd Assistant Engineer, U.S.S. Richmond to E.W. Parks, 1861 October 31. Written on the Mississippi River. Describes the battle on the Mississippi River between Confederate ram Manassas and the Union’s U.S.S. Richmond and Vincennes.
86.40.21.A-B Box 8 Letter written by Charles Fates, Army of the Potomac, 2nd Division, 3rd Corps to sister, 1863 July 27. Written in Warrenton, Virginia. Includes envelope.
91.11 Box 12 Letter written by Charles Figgat, Headquarters 2nd Army Corps to wife, 1864 April 17.
86.40.26.1 Box 8 Letter written by Esther Goodwin to cousin, 1864 August 29. Written in Middlebury. Letter between cousins discussing the war and the death of Philemon Sloat, including the letter 86.40.26 written by Sloat just before he died in battle to C.G. [Charles Goodwin] and C.G.'s wife--probably Esther Goodwin. Includes transcript. [See also 86.40.26.A-B.]
86.40.7 Box 8 Letter written by T.C. Holland, United Confederate Veterans to J.E. Breve, 1924 March 31. Written in Steedman, Missouri. Recounts his experiences in Civil War battles with various commanders. Includes transcript.
72.539 Box 3 Letter written by Warren Hutchinson, 104th Illinois Infantry to H.H. Wild, 1861 June 9. Written in Tonica, Illinois. Very faded and difficult to read.
76.2 Box 6 Letter written by Adolphus Jeffrey, United States Army Corps, 12th Hospital to Mr. Word, 1862 January 28. Written in Harpers Ferry, Virginia.
72.442 Box 2 Fragment written by Andrew Johnson, Vice President of the United States, undated. [Probably not an original signature. Looks like a fragment clipped by an autograph seeker.]
86.40.8 Box 8 Letter written by William Preston Johnston, Confederate soldier, to Mrs. John Morgan, 1863 September 22. Written in Richmond, Virginia. Reassures her of her husband's safety.
72.493 Box 2 Letter written by Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston to General Breckinridge, 1862 March 25. Written in Corinth, Tennessee. Johnston wrote on the blank side of a Memphis and Charleston Railroad ticket, with Breckinridge replying on the printed side. The message discusses troop movements.
86.40.22 Box 8 Letter written by Merritt W. Kingsbury to brother Martin H. Kingsbury, 1864 November 8. Written in Strausburg, Virginia.
72.385.A-B Box 1 Letter written by Nelly [Nellie] Lee to any soldier who did not receive mail that day, 1864 April 15. Written in Hudson, Michigan. Includes envelope.
89.1.6 Box 8 Letter written by James Longstreet, Confederate General to Ulysses S. Grant, 1865 June 8. Written in Lynchburg, Virginia. Requests the release of four prisoners of war, and urging that government policy should be to release all prisoners of war, now that the war is over, but especially these four men.
72.472 Box 2 Letter written by George McClellan to Dr. Ellis, 1863 April 10.
2014.3 Box 19 Bound volume written by John Alexander McClernand, Commander of the Army of the Mississippi, 1862-1864. Contains handwritten copies of communication to and from McClernand. Includes documentation of McClernand’s efforts to restore his reputation and rank after being relieved of duty.
72.440 Box 2 Letter written by James B. McPherson, General, Army of the Tennessee to General John MacArthur, 1864 June 30. Written near Kennesaw Mountain, Tennessee.
86.40.11 Box 8 Telegram written by John Hunt Morgan, Confederate General to Mrs. John Morgan, 1864 May 10. Written in Glade Springs, Virginia. [In telegram office clerk’s hand.]
86.40.3 Box 8 Letter written by Thomas J. Moore, Confederate Soldier to cousin, 1865 May 9. Written in Johnson's Island, Ohio. Discusses state of his family. Includes transcription.
2007.70.A-C Box 16 Letters written by H.W. Pemmke and S. Pemmke to Peter Stainbrook, 1865 April 22. Written in Chicago, Illinois. Includes envelope addressed to Mr. Peter Stainbrook, Philo Post Office, Mashingum County, Ohio. The first letter describes events in Chicago following Lincoln's assassination, the reward offered for the capture of John Wilkes Booth and celebrations held at the capture of Richmond and the surrender of Lee. The second letter seems to be written by the recipient’s sister and wife to the author of the first letter. She describes their five week old baby and asks about marriages and babies in the family.
2009.7.2 Box 18 Report written by Lafayette Pettibone, 74th Illinois Infantry, Chaplain to Officers, 1865 February 1. Written in camp near Huntsville, Alabama. Reports on January 1865.
86.40.23 Box 8 Letter written by Thomas Peyton, Union Soldier to Mattie, undated. Written near Nags Head, North Carolina. Discusses his views on the war and black people, as well as his present camp position.
91.10 Box 12 Letter written by Horace Porter, General to “Sir & Comrade,” 1897 April 9. Written in New York, New York. Regarding a Tiffany commemorative medal. Includes a brief biography of his activities during the Civil War.
86.40.24 Box 8 Letter written by T.C. Prescott, 8th New Hampshire Infantry to Cyrus, 1863 April 5. Written in camp near Algiers, Louisiana. Discusses his brigade's various movements in Louisiana. Also discusses the sinking of the gunboat USS Mississippi.
72.439 Box 2 Letter written by John H. Roe, 16th Illinois Infantry to A.K. Stiles, Esquire, Sycamore, Illinois, 1862 February 6. Written in Paducah, Kentucky. Regarding property.
72.432 Box 2 Letter written by George C. Rogers, 15th Illinois Infantry to L. Thomas, Adjutant General, 1865 May 25. Written near Washington, D.C. Regarding commission for George Muslin [?].
86.40.4 Box 8 Letter written by E.H. Ross, Confederate Soldier to wife, 1862 February 5. Written in Bell's Tavern, Barren City, Kentucky.

72.491

72.492

Oversize Box 22 Two notebooks containing copies of 172 telegrams, each endorsed by Confederate General Daniel Ruggles, sent to various recipients from camps in Louisiana and Mississippi, 1862 August 21-October 23. The telegrams deal with military activities, including the fortification of Port Hudson, Louisiana; the attack upon Ponchatoula, Louisiana; and preparations for the capture of Holly Springs, Mississippi.
86.40.15 Box 8 Orders written by Daniel Ruggles, Confederate General to Major W.J. Anderson, Major St. Cuny, Major J.M. Quinlan, Captain Quitman, Captain Dashiell, Lieutenant H.H. Price, 1864 February 19. Written in Columbus, [North Carolina ?]. Orders to move troops, possibly in code.
86.40.25.A-B Box 8 Letter written by Luther G. Sherman, 209th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company D to Samuel Gillen, brother, 1864 October 8. Written in camp near Point of Rocks, Virginia. [See also 86.40.26.1.]
72.446 Box 2 Letter written by Franz Sigel, General, Army of Virginia, I Corps to Colonel Ruggles, Chief of Staff to Major General Pope [?], 1862 August 14. Written in camp near Robertson River, Virginia.
86.40.26.A-B Box 8 Letters written by Philemon Sloat, 45th Pennsylvania Infantry to Charles Goodwin and wife [Esther], 1864 June 30. Written in battlefield near Virginia. Includes transcript.
86.40.19.A-B Box 8 Letter written by J. Gerry Smith to brother [Luke?], 1862 September 12. Written in Bluffton, Indiana. Discusses home life and how everyone is leaving to go to war or waiting to hear if they will be drafted. He writes from the Banner office. Includes envelope.
86.40.20 Box 8 Copy of letter written by E. Kirby Smith, Confederate General to Mr. President [Jefferson Davis], 1862 November 8. Written in Department of East Tennessee. Recommends Colonel John H. Morgan be promoted to Brigadier General. Concurred by Braxton Bragg.
86.40.27 Box 8 Letter written by Lucas F. Smith, 101st Indiana Infantry, Company G to home, 1865 May 8. Written in camp near Richmond, Virginia. Describes the march home after the war has ended. He was in the Atlanta campaign, and more recently had marched from Raleigh, North Carolina to Richmond. Soon they would head on to Washington, D.C. and then their unit would be discharged. He talks about getting a pass to go into Richmond to visit friends. He talks about President Johnson's actions and about hearsay about John Wilkes Booth. He mentions the destruction he sees in the South and how it is hard to return home when the Confederates have no homes to return to. He discusses the honorable goal of restoring the Union.

[Back to summary.]

Series 30: General Diaries, Narrative Accounts and Minute Books, 1860-1886

89.22 Box 9 Diary written by John M. Burgh, 1862 August 14; 1863 March - 1863 September. A soldier who enlisted in Oskaloosa, Iowa.
91.4.4 Box 12 Diary written by George H. Butler, 12th Wisconsin Infantry, Company G, 1864 January 1-December 31. Written in Natchez, Mississippi.
89.23.1 Box 20 Minute book of the Ellsworth Guard Zoaves of San Francisco, California, 1861 June 25-1866 June 4. Meeting minutes cover the establishment of this militia unit in California. Though some soldiers from California fought in the Civil War, it does not appear that this unit was ever deployed.
89.19 Box 9 Manuscript written by Stephen French, 111th Illinois Infantry, 1886 December 20. Written in Springfield, Illinois. "Recollections of Five days in the Forest of Georgia 1864. Escape from Andersonville Prison. Recaptured and final Release."
2014.3 Box 19 Handwritten account written by Frank M. Goodman, Sergeant, Company K, 117th Illinois Infantry, circa 1870. "The Red River Campaign of 1864." Includes typed, annotated, and supplemented transcript.
2007.69 Box 16 Diary written by Myron E. Palmer, 83rd Illinois Infantry, Company A, 1864 January 1-1864 November 17. Written in Clarksville, Tennessee. Includes account and correspondence listings in back.
72.428 Box 20 Minute book kept by the Soldiers’ Aid Society of Selma, Ohio, 1863 June 23-1865 June 24. Includes constitution and description of activities of women’s group in support of the troops fighting in the war.
72.538 Box 3 Diary written by Leroy Van Horne, United States, 18th Regular Army, 1863 June 22-1863 December 12. Musician.
2008.2 Box 17 Diary written by Lucian H. Wells, 72nd Illinois Infantry, Company E, 1860 March 6-1867 December 31. Has suffered water damage. 1860-1862 entries written in Cass, Illinois. In mid-1862, he enlists, and travels to Tennessee. In 1863, he serves in St. Louis and Keokuk, Iowa and marches to Vicksburg, Mississippi. In 1864, he is stationed in Mississippi. He also travels on furlough to upstate New York, where he was born, before returning to posts in Tennessee. In 1865, he travels throughout the south in Tennessee, Mississippi, New Orleans, and Alabama before mustering out in August and returning to Illinois and spending time in upstate New York. Entries from 1866 and 1867 are written in Lemont, Illinois.

[Back to summary.]

Item List: Part 2

Series 1: Currency, 1856-1864, undated

92.45.1 Oversize Folder 5 District of Richmond, Pennsylvania $500 bond, 1853 February 10
72.518.3 Box 2 Exchange Bank of Tennessee currency. Value of $1.00, 1856 January 1
72.518.4 Box 2 Exchange Bank of Tennessee currency. Value of $5.00, 1856 July 1
72.518.2 Box 2 Exchange Bank of Tennessee currency. Value of $5.00, 1857
72.518.8 Box 2 North Western Bank of Georgia currency. Value of $5.00, 1857 February 12
72.516.C Box 2 Bank of Greensborough currency. Value of $10.00, Greensborough, Georgia, 1858 December 7
72.518.7 Box 2 Bank of Greensborough currency. Value of $5.00, Greensborough, Georgia, 1858 December 7
72.516.D Box 2 People's Bank of Kentucky currency. Value of $3.00, 1860
72.517 Box 2 New Orleans, Jackson, & Great Northern Railroad Company currency. Value of $3.00, undated
72.518.6 Box 2 State of Missouri currency. Value of $1.00, Confederate States of America. Missouri Defence [sic] Bond, 1861
86.33 Oversize Box 23 Confederate States of America currency. Value of $50.00, Montgomery, Alabama, 1861 May 1
91.14 Box 12 Confederate States of America currency. Value of $20.00, Richmond, Virginia, 1861 September 2
87.5.5 Box 8 State of North Carolina currency. Value of $0.10, Raleigh, North Carolina, 1861 October 1
87.5.3 Box 8 State of North Carolina currency. Value of $0.20, Raleigh, North Carolina, 1861 October 1
72.521.3 Box 3 State of North Carolina currency. Value of $2.00, Confederate States of America. Raleigh, North Carolina, 1861 October 2
72.521.1 Box 3 State of North Carolina currency. Value of $2.00, Confederate States of America. Raleigh, North Carolina, 1861 October 4
72.521.8 Box 3 State of North Carolina currency. Value of $1.00, Confederate States of America. Raleigh, North Carolina, 1861 October 12
72.521.7 Box 3 State of North Carolina currency. Value of $1.00, Confederate States of America. Raleigh, North Carolina, 1861 October 16
72.516.G Box 2 State of Missouri currency. Value of $20.00, Confederate States of America. Torn in multiple pieces. 1862 January 1
72.516.A Box 2 Granville Alexandrian Society currency. Value of $3.00, Confederate States of America, Granville, Ohio, 1862 February 8
2007.63.F Box 15 Confederate States of America currency. Value of $100.00, Richmond, Virginia, 1862 June 21
87.5.1 Box 8 State of North Carolina currency. Value of $1.00, Raleigh, North Carolina, 1862 September 1
87.5.2 Box 8 Greensboro Mutual Life Insurance and Company life insurance certificate. Value of $0.25, North Carolina. Greensboro, North Carolina, 1862 September 1
92.31.1 Box 12 Confederate States of America currency. Value of $5.00, Richmond, Virginia, 1862 December 2
72.520 Box 3 Confederate States of America currency. Value of $100.00, 1862 December 2
72.521.4 Box 3 State of North Carolina currency. Value of $1.00, Confederate States of America. Raleigh, North Carolina, 1863 January 1
72.521.2 Box 3 State of North Carolina currency. Value of $2.00, Confederate States of America. Raleigh, North Carolina, 1863 January 1
72.521.5 Box 3 State of North Carolina currency. Value of $50.00, Confederate States of America. Raleigh, North Carolina, 1863 January 1
92.6.1 Box 12 State of Alabama currency. Value of $0.05, Confederate States of America. Montgomery, Alabama, 1863 January 1
92.6.2 Box 12 State of Alabama currency. Value of $0.10, Confederate States of America. Montgomery, Alabama, 1863 January 1
72.521.6 Box 3 State of Alabama currency. Value of $0.50, Confederate States of America. Montgomery, Alabama, 1863 January 1
87.5.4 Box 8 Confederate States of America currency. Value of $0.50, Richmond, Virginia, 1864 February 17
2007.63.A Box 15 Confederate States of America currency. Value of $1.00, Richmond, Virginia, 1864 February 17
2007.63.B Box 15 Confederate States of America currency. Value of $2.00, Richmond, Virginia, 1864 February 17
2007.63.C Box 15 Confederate States of America currency. Value of $5.00, Richmond, Virginia, 1864 February 17
2007.63.D Box 15 Confederate States of America currency. Value of $10.00, Richmond, Virginia, 1864 February 17
72.917 Box 4 Confederate States of America currency. Value of $10.00, Includes poem on back. Richmond, Virginia, 1864 February 17
2007.63.E Box 15 Confederate States of America currency. Value of $20.00, Richmond, Virginia, 1864 February 17
84.75 Box 7 Confederate States of America currency. Value of $20.00, Richmond, Virginia, 1864 February 17
91.8 Box 12 Confederate States of America currency. Value of $50.00, Richmond, Virginia, 1864 February 17
72.519 Box 3 Confederate States of America currency. Value of $500.00, In Memoriam, Respectfully dedicated to the holders of Confederate treasury notes poem on back. Richmond, Virginia, 1864 February 17
72.516.E Box 2 State of Mississippi currency. Value of $3.00, Confederate States of America, 1864 May 1
86.40.5 Box 8 Confederate States of America, Certificate of Loan to the State. Value of $500.00, six per cent non-taxable certificate. Richmond, Virginia, 1864 October 22
72.483 Box 2 Commonwealth of Virginia currency. Value of $1.00, Confederate States of America, undated
72.516.B Box 2 Exchange Bank of the State of Georgia currency. Value of $2.00, Confederate States of America, undated
72.516.F Box 2 State of Georgia currency. Value of $10.00, Confederate States of America, undated
72.518.1 Box 2 Merchants Planters Bank, State of Georgia currency. Value of $1.00, Confederate States of America, undated
72.518.5 Box 2 Bank of the State of Georgia currency. Value of $5.00, Savannah, Georgia, undated
72.521.9 Box 3 Letter regarding provenance of much of the above listed currency, undated.
2000.2.1 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-first issue. Value of $0.05, Washington, D.C., 1862 July 17
2000.2.2 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-first issue. Value of $0.05, Washington, D.C., 1862 July 17
2000.2.4 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department Fractional currency-first issue. Value of $0.10, Washington, D.C., 1862 July 17
2000.2.5 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-first issue. Value of $0.10, Washington, D.C., 1862 July 17
2000.2.3.A-B Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-first issue. Value of $0.25, (2 stamps) Washington, D.C., 1862 July 17
2000.2.6 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-first issue. Value of $0.50, Washington, D.C., 1862 July 17
92.24 Box 12 Loan certificate from George C. Thomas. Loan of $2,000.00 to the City of Philadelphia. "Loan for the defence [sic] of the city ordinance of June 8, 1861." Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1863 January 7
2000.2.17 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-second issue. Value of $0.03, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.18 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-second issue. Value of $0.03, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.7 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-second issue. Value of $0.05, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.8 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-second issue. Value of $0.05, (2 stamps) Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.9 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-second issue. Value of $0.05, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.10.A Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-second issue. Value of $0.10, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.10.B Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-second issue. Value of $0.10, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.11 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-second issue. Value of $0.10, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.12 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-second issue. Value of $0.10, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.13 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-second issue. Value of $0.25, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.14 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-second issue. Value of $0.25, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.15 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-second issue. Value of $0.25, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.16 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-second issue. Value of $0.50, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.19 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-third issue. Value of $0.05, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.20 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-third issue. Value of $0.05, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.21 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-third issue. Value of $0.10, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.22 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-third issue. Value of $0.10, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.23 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-third issue. Value of $0.25, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.24 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-third issue. Value of $0.25, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.25 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-third issue. Value of $0.25, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.27 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.10, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.28 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.10, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.29 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.10, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.30 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.10, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.41 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.10, Washington, D.C., 1864 June 30
2000.2.42 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.10, Washington, D.C., 1864 June 30
2000.2.43 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.10, Washington, D.C., 1864 June 30
2000.2.44 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.10, Washington, D.C., 1864 June 30
2000.2.45 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.10, Washington, D.C., 1864 June 30
2000.2.31 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.15, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.32 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.15, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.26 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency-fourth issue. Value of $0.25, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.33 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.25, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.34 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.25, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.35 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.25, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.36 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.25, (2 stamps). Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.46 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.25, Washington, D.C., 1864 June 30
2000.2.47 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.25, Washington, D.C., 1864 June 30
2000.2.48 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.25, Washington, D.C., 1864 June 30
2000.2.37 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.50, Washington, D.C., 1863 March 3
2000.2.38 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.50, Washington, D.C., 1864 June 30
2000.2.39 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.50, Washington, D.C., 1864 June 30
2000.2.40 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.50, Washington, D.C., 1864 June 30
2000.2.49 Box 13 United States of America Treasury Department, Fractional currency- fourth issue. Value of $0.50, Washington, D.C., 1864 June 30
72.579 Box 3 United States postage/fractional currency. $0.05 cents, undated

[Back to summary.]

Series 2: Elections, 1862-1877

91.5.8 Oversize Folder 4 Broadside with articles about campaign rallies for Stephen A. Douglas, 1860
86.22 Oversize Folder 6 Illustrated poster “National Republican Chart: Presidential Campaign, 1860,” H.H. Lloyd & Co., New York, 1860. Includes information on the candidates, the platform, results from past elections, and population and size statistics.
90.9.19 Box 11 Leaflet with printed campaign platform of Union, 1862 [?]
72.786 Box 3 Union ticket, 1864. "Abraham Lincoln for President, Andrew Johnson for Vice-President." Ticket also lists candidates for a variety of positions in Illinois, including Richard Oglesby for governor.
86.39 Box 8 Flyer with printed platforms for Republican and Democratic conventions, 1864. Republican, Abraham Lincoln for president and Andrew Johnson for vice-president in Baltimore, Maryland. Democratic, George B. McClellan for president and George H. Pendleton for vice-president in Chicago, Illinois.
2009.7.8 Oversize Box 23 Broadside, “The Real Chicago Platform as Expounded by the Democratic Orators at Chicago,” [1864]
86.24 Oversize Folder 6 Broadside, “A Southern Peace!” [1864] Poster urges southerners to vote for Lincoln and Johnson “and thus secure the only sure Peace.”
90.43 Box 12 Pamphlet, “Instructions to Inspectors of Election as to Registration,” circa 1868
92.23.1 Box 11 Admission ticket to Gallery of the United States Senate Inauguration Day ticket. Admit the bearer, 1869 March 4
72.302 Box 1 Democratic and Liberal Republican campaign ticket, 1872
92.23.2 Box 11 Admission ticket to Counting the Vote for President and Vice-President. Admit Bearer to Gallery of the United States House of Representatives, 1877 February 23

[Back to summary.]

Series 3: Patriotic Envelopes, 1861-1865, undated

72.360 Box 1 Patriotic Union envelope reading, "The Nation Mourns! April 15, 1865," circa 1865. Referencing assassination of Abraham Lincoln.
72.361 Box 1 Patriotic Union envelope reading, "The Fence that Uncle Abe Built," undated
72.362 Box 1 Patriotic Union envelope reading, "With these true hearts through Victory to Union and Peace," undated

72.363

72.916.1

Box 1

Box 4

Patriotic Union envelope with image of Ulysses S. Grant and reading, "We will fight it out on this line if it takes all summer," undated (2 copies)
72.364 Box 1 Patriotic Union envelope showing Souvenir of Victory, undated
72.365 Box 1 Patriotic Union envelope, undated
72.366 Box 1 Patriotic Union envelope reading, "The destruction of the Snake of South Carolina," Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1861
78.1.1 Box 7 Patriotic Union envelope reading, "Union preserve this Flag," undated
78.1.2 Box 7 Patriotic Union envelope reading, "The UNION must and shall be preserved!" Undated
78.1.3 Box 7 Patriotic Union envelope reading, "The Pirate Flag. Jeff. Davis A.H. Stephens," undated
78.1.4 Box 7 Patriotic Union envelope with illustration of man hanging from gallows over coffin reading, "The Traitor's Doom or Jeff. Davis 'Alone,'" undated
78.1.5 Box 7 Patriotic Union envelope reading, "God Speed the Right," undated
78.1.6 Box 7 Patriotic Union envelope reading, "Death to Traitors," undated
78.1.7 Box 7 Patriotic Union envelope with illustration of line of soldiers distracted by a woman reading, "Officers - FRONT FACE!! 'Why in th' thunder don't you cast your eyes to the front!!'" Undated
86.40.33.1 Box 8 Patriotic Union envelope with illustration of red flag with A.L. [Abraham Lincoln] kicking J.D. [Jefferson Davis] in the pants with the words "His Mark," undated
86.40.33.2 Box 8 Patriotic Union envelope with illustration of hands shaking across a document that reads “Union” at the top. Includes phrase, "United We Stand, Divided We Fall," undated
86.40.33.3 Box 8 Patriotic Union envelope with illustration of hands shaking across a document that reads “Union” at the top, undated
86.40.33.4 Box 8 Patriotic Union envelope showing Abraham Lincoln as a shooting star and reading, "Star of the North, or the Comet of 1861," undated
86.40.33.5 Box 8 Patriotic Union envelope with illustration of many-pointed star with abbreviations of southern states in each point and an African American face in the center and reading, "I'se Contraband," undated
86.40.33.6 Box 8 Patriotic Union envelope reading, "UNION! The Seal of the Nation, The Arms of the free, Shall Secession put down, And restore Unity," undated
86.40.33.7 Box 8 Patriotic Union envelope showing U.S. Rifle unlocking the padlock to Slavery and reading, "The Lock and Key," undated
72.510 Box 2 Patriotic Confederate envelope reading, "May those Northern fanatics, who abuse their Southern neighbors, Approach near enough to feel the point of our sabers; May they come near enough to hoar [sic] the click of a trigger, And learn that a white man is better than a nigger," North Carolina, undated
72.511 Box 2 Unidentified envelope with handwritten, “1862 Rebel stamp,” circa 1862
72.512 Box 2 Patriotic Confederate envelope reading, "Gather around your country's flag, Men of the South the hour has come-None may falter, none may lag-March to the sound of fife and drum," undated
72.514 Box 2 Patriotic Confederate envelope reading, "We are in the Field, and the Bars are Up!" undated
72.916.2 Box 4 Patriotic Confederate envelope reading, "All I want is to be let a Loan, $15,000,000. I'll take anything-But Washington, that's no Capitol for me," undated

[Back to summary.]

Series 4: Ephemera, 1861-1911, undated

77.115 Art & Artifact Broadside advertising The Weekly Day-Book for 1861
86.12.2 Box 7 Recruitment poster for the Rockford Zouaves. Reads, "Volunteers Wanted! From Winnebago County! 'We will Defend the Flag of our Fathers, and Maintain the Integrity of the Union.' Notice is Hereby Given, That the Roll for the enlistment of Volunteers to fill up the ranks of Rockford Zouaves . . . ." Winnebago County, Illinois, 1861 April 17
72.422 Box 2 Military pass issued to A.B. Lancott. Alexandria, Virginia, 1861 June
72.424 Box 2 Military pass. Washington, D.C., 1861 July 11
72.405 Box 1 Soldier newspaper, The National Guard, for Camp Pennsylvania, Baltimore, Maryland, 1861 July 26
86.10 Box 7 Soldier newspaper of the 37th Regiment Illinois Volunteers: The Camp Register, Vol. 1, No. 1. Otterville, Missouri, 1861 October 26
72.412 Box 2 Civilian pass issued to Andrew Wright. Washington, D.C., 1861 November 1
72.425 Box 2 Military pass for J.A. Cox of the 44th Ohio Infantry, Camp Piatt and Camp Ewing, 1861 November 8
90.22.1 Box 11 Advertisement, Charles Stokes 'One Price' First Class Clothing under the Continental Hotel Phil. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, with American flag in the background, circa 1862
72.278 Box 1 Newspaper clipping. "The Rebels in Large Force in Western Tennessee," Chicago Times, 1862 August 5
72.410 Box 1 Train ticket from Illinois Central Railroad Company for trip from Bloomington to East St. Louis on the Chicago, Alton and St. Louis Railroad. Issued to E.W. Beach, 1862 August 7
72.409 Box 1 Train ticket from Illinois Central Railroad Company for trip from Bloomington to East St. Louis on the Chicago, Alton and St. Louis Railroad. Issued to N. Rossman, 1862 August 13
2017.93 Box 19 Carte de visite with a memorial note pasted over the image reading, “Andrew W. Adams Co. II. 29th Regiment Indiana Volunteers. Killed at the Battle of Chickamauga – 1863” 1863.
72.603 Oversize Folder 2 Broadside “To the Laboring Men of New York,” by a Democratic Workingman, 1863 July 18. Implores men not to riot or break the law.
72.413 Box 2 Military pass issued to A.R. Forsyth to pass through lines to Murfreesboro, Tennessee, 1863 December 12
86.38 Box 8 Broadside from the National Union Executive Committee, "What Jeff. Davis thinks of the War," New York, New York, circa 1864
72.785 Oversize Box 23 Broadside, “Copperheads in Council! Declarations of the Leaders. Read and Ponder what they Say!” New Hampshire, [1864]
72.415 Box 2 Military pass issued to A.R. Forsyth to pass through lines to Nashville, Tennessee, 1864 January 12
72.357 Box 1 Newspaper clipping. "A New Draft for 500,000 Men," unidentified publication, [1864 February 1]
72.498 Box 2 Newsletter, The Prisoner Vidette, Vol. 1, No. 1. Camp Douglas Prison, Chicago, Illinois, [1864 March 21]. Includes annotated transcript. Published by the Confederate Prisoners of Camp Douglas, namely members of Colonel Dick Morgan’s 14th Kentucky Cavalry Regiment. This manuscript newspaper contains camp gossip, editorials, news from home, poetry, and even advertising. This copy of The Prisoner Vidette underwent conservation in 1976. Although several small gaps remain, approximately 90 percent of the text is now legible.
89.3 Box 8 Admission ticket to the United States Senate for the Impeachment of the President. Washington, D.C., 1864 April 6
72.411 Box 2 Military pass that allows the bearer to pass within the lines of the fortifications to Alexandria, Virginia and return, 1864 April 9
92.48 Box 12 Railroad timetable No. 7 for Nashville and Northwestern Line, 1864 August 10. Fragile.
86.8.1 Box 7 “Negro passport” issued by Confederate States of America War Department, Richmond, Virginia, 1865
72.953 Oversize Folder 3 Broadside, “Seven Thirty Facts and Figures!” with “Patriotic Songs” on verson, circa 1865
86.26 Box 7 Circular of the Special Committee on Toys, Fancy Goods and Dress Trimmings for the Northwestern Sanitary Fair Rooms, Chicago, Illinois, 1865 March 1
72.500 Box 2 Railroad pass from Petersburg, Virginia to Richmond. 1865 April 22
90.9.2 Box 11 Broadside listing the Order of the Day, July 4, 1865. Procession and Programme. [Decatur, Illinois.]
72.408 Box 1 Military pass for Major General J.F. Hartranft. Washington, D.C. military prison, 1865 July 7
72.427 Oversize Box 23 Broadside, “The Soldier’s Prayer Book, or Dick and his Pack of Cards, 1866
2008.17 Oversize Folder 5 Broadside advertising a speech by Illinois Congressman John Franklin Farnsworth, circa 1866
92.31.2 Box 12 $0.50 cent stamp. Date handwritten on stamp. Also "G.K. Story [illegible]," 1872 September 21
72.504 Box 2 Cancelled check from Mobile Savings Bank, Mobile, Alabama, 1874 September 10
72.307 Box 1 Newspaper clipping. "Grant Dead," The New York Evening Telegram, 1885 July 23
72.314 Box 1 Admission ticket to memorial service for Ulysses S. Grant in Manhattan Beach, 1885 August 9
91.1.1-4 Box 12 Name cards for the family of General John Logan: Mrs. John A. Logan, Mary Logan Tucker, William F. Tucker, U.S.A., Mr. John A. Logan, Jr. Probably used in relation to mourning the death of John Logan, circa 1886
72.923.10.A-B Box 4 Newspaper clippings regarding the deaths of William T. Sherman and John Alexander Logan. Clippings are fragile. The New York World, 1891 February 14; 1886 December 29
72.923.11 Box 4 Newspaper clippings regarding the death of William T. Sherman. Clippings are fragile. The New York World, 1891 February 14
72.717 Box 3 Newspaper clipping, “Mr. McConnell of Chicago Comes a Thousand Miles to Meet the Gallant Col. John R. Lane Whom He Shot at Gettysburg,” Raleigh Post, 1903 March 24. See also 72.731, 72.732 and American Civil War Photographs and Images and Grand Army of the Republic Photographs and Images.
72.433 Box 2 Newspaper clipping about the death of Mrs. R.L. Kilpatrick. "Only Woman with a War Record Dies," Springfield, Ohio, 1911
72.459 Box 2 Newspaper clipping with image of "The Marshall House, Where Ellsworth was Shot," unidentified publication, undated. See also 72.455, 72.460 and American Civil War Photographs and Images and Grand Army of the Republic Photographs and Images, Series 1.
72.430 Box 2 Newspaper clipping about Pauline Cushman's work for the Union, undated
86.36 Box 8 Brochure: "The Life of Jeff. Davis in Five Expressive Tableaux," undated
72.787 Oversize Folder 3 Broadside, “Judge Drummond on the Suppression of the Chicago Times,” undated

[Back to summary.]

Series 5: Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) and other Civil War Veterans Groups

Subseries A: Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) and other Civil War Veterans Groups, 1866-1957, undated

72.751 Box 3 Ritual of the GAR. Decatur, Illinois, undated. In 1866, Dr. Benjamin F. Stephenson assumed the position of Commander of the GAR and organized a central department at Springfield. A ritual was worked out, and its printing was assigned to the Decatur Tribune, owned by Civil War veterans Isaac N. Coltrin and Joseph M. Prior. The printers were so impressed that they asked to organize a post. Since the Springfield group had not yet received its charter, Decatur received the first post charter on 6 April 1866. This pamphlet is Isaac Coltrin's copy of the Ritual of the Grand Army of the Republic, circa 1866
72.735 Box 3 GAR Constitution, 1866
72.736 Box 3 GAR Regulations used by Post No. 1, 1866
72.738 Box 3 GAR Proceedings of Enlistment and Muster. Springfield, [Illinois], 1866
72.749 Oversize Box 23 Certificate naming charter members of Illinois Post Number 1 in Decatur, 1866 April 6. Members named: M.F. Kanan, G.R. Steele, George H. Dunning, I.C. Pugh, J.H. Wale, J.T. Bishop, C. Rubsame, J.W. Routh, B.F. Sibley, J.W. Coltrin, Joseph Prior and A. Toland.
72.700 Box 3 GAR Department of Illinois General Orders No. 2. from Robert M. Woods and B.F. Stephenson. Appointment of GAR officers. Springfield, Illinois, 1866 May 1
72.701 Box 3 GAR Post No. 2 circular regarding adopted preamble and resolutions by Fred I. Dean. Springfield, Illinois, 1866 December 19
72.703 Box 3 GAR Post No. 1 notice of meeting. Decatur, Illinois, 1867 January 30
72.1063 Oversize Box 21 Membership roster for GAR General Willich Post No. 780, Des Plaines, Illinois, 1897-1924. Post 780 was chartered June 8, 1867. The book was maintained by adding death dates next to members’ entries. The latest death was entered in 1924. Entries also include information about members’ birthplace, residence and military enrollment.
72.696 Box 3 GAR Convention proceedings, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1868 January 15-17
72.739 Box 3 Pamphlet, GAR Rules and regulations as revised and adopted in national convention, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1868 January 15-17.
72.698 Box 3 General Orders No. 1, relating that John A. Logan accepts position of Commander-in-Chief of GAR. Washington, D.C., 1868 January 21
72.706 Box 3 United States Army Reunion Banquet Program. Chamber of Commerce, Chicago, 1868 December 16
72.707.1 Box 3 United States Army Reunion Banquet announcement and invitation. Chamber of Commerce, Chicago, 1868 December 16
72.707.2 Box 3 United States Army Reunion Banquet admittance card. Chicago, Illinois, [1868 December 16]
72.978 Box 4 19th Illinois Infantry Veterans. Constitution and By-Laws. Chicago, Illinois, 1879 August 22
72.972.2 Box 4 Pamphlet, “A Sheridan Night, a souvenir, being an account of the presentation of a bust of General Sheridan to the Union Veteran Club, of Chicago at Central Music Hall,” 1884 May 5
93.5 Box 13 Official Records and meeting minutes of the GAR Reno Post No.6, East Greenwich, Rhode Island, 1883 February 17 - 1887 October 24.
72.905 Box 4 Funeral program, GAR DeGolyer Post No. 110, Department of Michigan. In memory of Mrs. George H. Evens. Died at Des Moines, Iowa, February 1, 1884. Buried at Hudson, Michigan, February 5, 1884. Printed by Charles H. Taylor, 1884 February 5
72.313 Box 1 Postcard, Chicago GAR Post 91 announcement about Post attending funeral of Ulysses S. Grant, 1885 August 4.
72.699 Box 3 General Orders No. 16 regarding the death of John A. Logan. Galesburg, Illinois, 1886 December 27
72.963 Box 4 Program for 21st National Encampment of the GAR. St. Louis, Missouri, 1887 September 27-30
72.998 Box 4 Grand Army Poems by Major Alfred A. North, 10th Regiment, Illinois Cavalry; Past Post Commander, Post No. 2; Original Organization, Department of Illinois, GAR. Springfield, Illinois, 1889
72.750 Oversize Box 23 Blank certificate of membership for Illinois Old Post One, GAR, circa 1890
92.55 Box 12 "Old Glory" written for The Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States and dedicated to the Commandery of Ohio. By Brevet Lieutenant Colonel Coates Kinney. Recited and sung at the Commandery of Ohio's Eighth Annual Meeting. Includes sheet music and lyrics. Ohio, 1891 May 6

72.747

72.748

Box 3 [Portrait of] Benjamin F. Stephenson, founder of the GAR, First Commander Department of Illinois, First Commander in Chief, GAR. Includes information on Society of GAR Old Post One, organized at Decatur, Illinois, June 25, 1891. Undated. [2 copies]
72.116 Box 1 Letter from Bertha Jahries, Ladies of the GAR, Chicago, to Comrade Eli Ammerson, 1894 July 23.
72.152 Box 1 Banquet souvenir for Chairman Committee of Arrangements and Toastmaster of Love Feast of the Blue and the Gray. Reads, "Frigidus dies est quum sinistris," 1895
72.789 Box 3 Membership Roll, 52nd Illinois Veteran Volunteer Association. J.S. Wilcox, president. Elgin, Illinois, 1895 June 24
2007.71 Box 16 GAR Columbia Post #706. Bound Book of newspaper clippings and report excerpts about George H. Thomas. The book was the property of J.E. Sanford. Chicago, Illinois, after 1899
72.1000 Box 4 Farragut Post No. 602, GAR Department of Illinois. Roster. Chicago, Illinois, 1900. [2 copies.]
72.708 Box 3 Invitation to 36th Annual Encampment of the GAR. Washington, D.C., 1902 October 6
72.979 Box 4 19th Illinois Infantry Veterans. "Supplement to the last report of the Adjutant General of the State of Illinois Correcting the Roster of the Troops of the Cairo Expedition of 1861 and making further additions" by Thomas W. Scott, Brigadier-General and Adjutant General. Springfield, Illinois, 1903
72.977 Box 4 Pamphlet, Survivors' Association of the Cairo Expedition of April, Memorial to the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, 1861. The following troops, organized in Chicago, Illinois, and belonging to the Cairo Expedition were Chicago Light Artillery, Chicago Zouaves, Company A and B, Chicago Light Infantry, Turner Union Cadets, Lincoln Rifles. Chicago, Illinois, 1903 March
72.710 Box 3 Invitation to the 38th National Encampment of the GAR. Boston, Massachusetts, 1904 August 15
72.635a Oversize Folder 2 Mounted certificate, “Testimonial to General John Charles Black,” 38th National Encampment of the GAR, Boston, Massachusetts, 1904 August 15-20. See also 72.585, 72.586, 72.587, 72.588 and American Civil War Photographs and Images and Grand Army of the Republic Photographs and Images.
72.906 Box 4 Incidental History of the Flags and Color Guard of the 2nd Michigan Veteran Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865 by Frederick Schneider. Lansing, Michigan, 1905.
72.796.A-B Box 4 Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, Commandery of the State of Ohio. Sign in sheet. Cincinnati, Ohio, 1907
72.741 Box 3 Unveiling Ceremonies, Memorial to Benjamin Franklin Stephenson, Founder of the GAR. Washington, D.C., 1909 July 3
72.147 Oversize Box 23 Illustrated print for 50th Anniversary of Battle of Gettysburg, July 1st, 2nd & 3rd 1913, Howard Keyser, Jr. Pub., Philadelphia, 1913. Includes text of Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln, 1863 November 19; surrender speech by Robert E. Lee, 1865 April 10; and speech upon second nomination by William McKinley, circa 1896.
72.922 Box 4 Description of sash worn by Lieutenant William Shipley, 27th Illinois Infantry. The sash was donated to GAR Abraham Lincoln Post No. 91 in Chicago, Illinois. Belmont, Missouri, 1913 August.
72.709 Box 3 Hooker Association of Massachusetts Tenth Annual Dinner Program. American House, Boston, 1915 November 13
72.967.1 Box 4 The Banner, published bi-monthly by the Commandery-in-Chief, Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, organized 1881. Volume 60, Number 5. Trenton, New Jersey, 1956 August
72.967.2 Box 4 The Banner, published bi-monthly by the Commandery-in-Chief, Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, organized 1881. Volume 61, Number 2. Trenton, New Jersey, 1957 March-April
72.702 Box 3 Invitation to GAR initiation ceremony. (2 copies, 1 annotated) Springfield, Illinois, undated

[Back to summary.]

Series 5: Grand Army of the Republic (G89.AR) and other Civil War Veterans Groups

Subseries B: Grand Army of the Republic Enlistment Forms, 1866

72.745.1 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #1, Isaac C. Pugh. 1866 April 6
72.745.3 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #3, Michael F. Hanan. 1866 April 6
72.745.4 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #4, George R. Stulo. 1866 April 6
72.745.6 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #6, Christian Reibsame. 1866 April 6
72.745.7 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #7, James M. Routh. 1866 April 6
72.745.8 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #8, George H. Dunning. 1866 April 6
72.745.9 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #9, J.A. Coltrin. 1866 April 6
72.745.10 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #10, Joseph Prior. 1866 April 6
72.745.11 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #11, B.F. Sibley. 1866 April 6
72.745.12 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #12, Aquilla Toland. 1866 April 6
72.745.13 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #13, W.G. Burns. 1866 April 10
72.745.14 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #14, Henry Corman. 1866 April 10
72.745.15 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #15, William E. Winholtz. 1866 April 10
72.745.16 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #16, William H. Andrews. 1866 April 10
72.745.17 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #17, William H.B. Rowe. 1866 April 10
72.745.19 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #19, A. Milt Lapham. 1866 April 17
72.745.20 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #20, William A. Albert. 1866 April 19
72.745.22 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #22, George B. Peake. 1866 April 19
72.745.23 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #23, Rolando S. Bell. 1866 April 19
72.745.25 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #25, Edward Lukins. 1866 April 23
72.745.26 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #26, Chris C. Glass. 1866 April 23
72.745.27 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #27, William H. Barnhart. 1866 April 23
72.745.28 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #28, S. Wheat West. 1866 April 23
72.745.29 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #29, John McFarland. 1866 May 1
72.745.30 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #30, Charles H. Fuller. 1866 May 9
72.745.31 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #31, Isaac A. Martin. 1866 May 9
72.745.32 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #32, Robert P. Lytle. 1866 May 16
72.745.33 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #33, Daniel Sprague. 1866 May 16
72.745.34 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #34, Joesph M. Gowdy. 1866 May 23
72.745.35 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #35, Peter H. Schlosser. 1866 May 23
72.745.36 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #36, James H. Glore [Glove?]. 1866 May 28
72.745.37 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #37, Richard C. Dawkins. 1866 June 6
72.745.38 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #38, Warren C. Gilbraith. 1866 June 6
72.745.39 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #39, Woodford W. [Piddirend?]. 1866 June 6
72.745.40 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #40, John C. Durgin. 1866 June 6
72.745.41 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #41, H.L. Mullen. 1866 June 11
72.745.42 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #42, Isaac D. Jennings. 1866 June 13
72.745.43 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #42, Aaron Smick. 1866 June 13
72.745.44 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #44, Samuel B. Crissey. 1866 June 13
72.745.45 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #45, Joel Seth [Pash?] [Post?]. 1866 June 13
72.745.46 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #46, J.H. Moore. 1866 June 20
72.745.47 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #47, John E. Jones. 1866 June 20
72.745.48 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #48, Norman Pringle. 1866 June 20
72.745.49 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #49, Albert Emmerson. 1866 June 20
72.745.50 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #50, John Lindsey. 1866 June 27
72.745.51 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #51, John D. Encke. 1866 June 27
72.745.52 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #52, Kilburn Harwood. 1866 June 27
72.745.53 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #53, Thomas McGorray. 1866 June 27
72.745.54 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #54, John Poppa. 1866 June 27
72.745.55 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #55, Jacob Bauer. 1866 June 27
72.745.56 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #56, John C. Suter. 1866 July 25
72.745.57 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #57, Eugene Hall. 1866 July 25
72.745.58 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #58, William Stockdale. 1866 October 1
72.745.59 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #59, J.R. Pugh. 1866 October 1
72.745.60 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #60, G.M. Bruce. 1866 October 1
72.745.61 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #61, Charles P. [Hansum?] [Housman?]. 1866 October 1
72.745.62 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #62, R.S. Evans. 1866 October 1
72.745.63 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #63, Willis H. Martin. 1866 October 1
72.745.64 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #64, Albert Martin. 1866 October 3
72.745.65 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #65, Charles P. Oyler. 1866 October 8
72.745.66 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #66, James W. House. 1866 October 8
72.745.68 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #68, Nicholas Geschwinder. 1866 October 10
72.745.69 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #69, F.R. Mory. 1866 October 3
72.745.70 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #70, Martin V. Harbour. 1866 October 6
72.745.71 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #71, Dayton Dunham. 1866 October 10
72.745.72 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #72, William E. Crissey. 1866 October 12
72.745.73 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #73, R.J. Roberts. 1866 October 12
72.745.74 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #74, W.R. Bradley. 1866 October 12
72.745.75 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #75, R.F. Jones. 1866 October 12
72.745.76 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #76, George W. Rolls. 1866 October 15
72.745.77 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #77, George Durfe. 1866 October 15
72.745.78 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #78, Philo S. Fenton. 1866 October 15
72.745.79 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #79, David Berlin. 1866 October 15
72.745.80 Box 5 Enlistment form for GAR Out-Post Encampment No. 1, Decatur, Illinois for Recruit #80, Henry Ebert. 1866 October 24

[Back to summary.]

Series 6: Abraham Lincoln, 1841-2005, undated

72.321 Box 1 Manuscript property deed of a sale agreement from Thomas and Sarah Lincoln (Abraham’s father and step mother) to Abraham Lincoln. Coles County, Illinois, 1841 October 25
72.907 Box 4 Pamphlet, speech by Abraham Lincoln delivered in Washington, D.C. on the “Reference of the President's Message in the House of Representatives,” 1848 January 14
86.27 Box 7 Transcript of speech by Abraham Lincoln in reply to Judge [Stephen] Douglas. Discusses Kansas, the Dred Scott decision and Utah. Springfield, Illinois, 1857 June 26
89.31.4 Box 9 Compilation pamphlet, "The Opinions of Abraham Lincoln upon Slavery and Its Issues indicated by his speeches, letters, messages, and proclamations." Illinois, Ohio, 1858-1863
72.908 Box 4 Transcript of speech by Abraham Lincoln delivered in Springfield, Illinois, 1858 July 17
72.328 Box 1 Pamphlet, "Life of Abraham Lincoln" by [John L. Scripps], Chicago Press and Tribune Co., 1860
72.327 Box 1 Transcript of speech by Abraham Lincoln delivered at the Cooper Institute of New York City, "The Republican Party Vindicated-The Demands of the South Explained," 1860 February 27
72.909 Box 4 Pamphlet, "Opposing Principles of Henry Clay and Abraham Lincoln. From Missouri Republican." St. Louis, Missouri, 1860 July 24
72.354 Box 1 General order respecting the observance of the Sabbath Day in the Army and Navy, 1862 November 15
72.157 Box 1 Facsimile letter from President Abraham Lincoln to Mrs. Bixby of Boston offering condolences for the loss of her 5 sons on the battlefield, 1864 November 21
72.372 Box 1 Facsimile of advertisement for Ford's Theater productions of "Our American Cousin" and "Benefit and Last Night of Miss Laura Keene." Washington, D.C., 1865 April 14
86.40.29 Box 8 Order of the Procession for Official Arrangements at Washington for the funeral solemnities of the late Abraham Lincoln, 1865 April 17
72.607 Oversize Folder 2 Broadside, “$100,000 Reward!” for Abraham Lincoln’s assassin, offered by the War Department, George F. Nesbitt & Co. Printers, New York, 1865 April 20
90.2.2 Box 10 "The President's Death and its Lessons: A Discourse on Sunday morning, April 23d, 1865, before the Second Unitarian Society of Philadelphia, by its pastor, William L. Chaffin." Published by King & Baird, Printers, Philadelphia, 1865 April 23
72.384 Box 1 Poem, "The Lost Chief" by Charles G. Halpine, printed in the New York Herald, 1865 April 26
72.380 Box 1 Order of Procession for Commemorating the occasion of the Funeral of our late President [Abraham Lincoln]. Indianapolis, Indiana, circa 1865
2008.35 Oversize Box 23 Broadside, “Obsequies of President Lincoln, Order of Funeral Procession,” circa 1865

86.29

90.31

Box 7

Box 11

Order of Procession for Reception of the Remains of President Lincoln at Chicago, 1865 May 1 (2 copies)
89.31.13 Box 9 Funeral address delivered at the burial of President Lincoln, at Springfield, Illinois, May 4, 1865. By Rev. Matthew Simpson, D.D., Methodist Episcopal Church. Published by Carlton & Porter, New York
89.31.14 Box 9 Three Sermons preached in the First Universalist Church, Philadelphia by Richard Eddy, Pastor. "The Martyr to Liberty," published by H.G. Leisenring's Steam-Power Printing House, Philadelphia, 1865 April 16; 1865 April 19; 1865 June 1
90.2.1 Box 10 Eulogy of Abraham Lincoln by Henry Champion Deming, before the General Assembly of Connecticut, at Allyn Hall, Hartford, Connecticut, 1865 June 8. Published by A.N. Clark & Co., State Printers, Hartford
90.2.3 Box 10 Opinion on the constitutional power of the military to try and execute the assassins of the president by Attorney General James Speed. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1865 July
2008.18 Oversize Folder 5 Illustrated poster advertisement seeking agents to sell Lincoln Memorial Album, circa 1866
77.33.9 Box 7 Brief biography of Washington Irving written by Abraham "Jack" Lincoln II, grandson of President Abraham Lincoln, son of Robert Todd Lincoln, when Jack was approximately 13 years old, 1886 November 19
72.939.F Box 4 Menu and ribbon from commemoration of Abraham Lincoln's birthday at The Ridgewood, Daytona, Florida, 1914 February 12
89.26 Box 9 Unpublished manuscript, "The Conspiracy to Implicate the Confederate Leaders in Lincoln's Assassination" by Seymour J. Frank. Dedicated: "To Herb Brayers: Who did more to write this paper than its author. Seymour." Chicago, Illinois, 1952 May 14
2010.7 Box 19 Program from the dedication of the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum. Springfield, Illinois, 2005 April 19
72.338 Box 1 Calling card/carte-de-visite card for Abraham Lincoln, undated
72.339 Box 1 Calling card/carte-de-visite card for Mary Todd Lincoln, undated
2009.6 Box 18 Postcard of an engraving of the Lincoln Monument in Lincoln Park, Chicago. Published by Gerson Bros., undated

[Back to summary.]

Series 7: Publications, Forms, Certificates, Official Documents, 1851-1912, undated

89.31.12 Box 9 Pamphlet printing of speech “History of Mason and Dixon's Line,” given by John H.B. Latrobe of Maryland before the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. Published by the Press of the Society, Philadelphia, 1855
72.460 Oversize Box 23 Certificate of membership in Cadets of the National Gurads for E.E. Ellsworth, 1856 August 27. See also 72.455, 72.459 and American Civil War Photographs and Images and Grand Army of the Republic Photographs and Images, Series 1.
86.40.28 Box 8 Certificate bestowing the title of Major in 186th Regiment of the 20th Brigade and 3rd Division of the Virginia Militia to Peregrin Hay. Signed by Henry A. Wise. Richmond, Virginia, 1859 March 16
86.12.3 Box 7 Certificate regarding I.L. [?] Angell’s honorary membership in Zouaves 60th Regiment. Chicago, Illinois, 1859 July 4
90.2.17 Box 10 Pamphlet, “Observations of Territorial Sovereignty,” of Senator [Stephen A.] Douglas [of Illinois] with an introductory preface by J.S. Black. Thomas McGill, Printer, Washington, D.C., 1860
86.31 Oversize Folder 4 Broadside printing of a Proclamation, Governor William A. Buckingham of Connecticut declaring April 6 to be a day of “Fasting, Humiliation and Prayer,” Norwich, Connecticut 1860 March 2
72.910 Box 4 Pamphlet, “Letter on the Crisis” by Robert McClelland, former Governor of Michigan. Detroit, Michigan, 1860 December 31
90.2.8 Box 10 Pamphlet printing of speech on the resolution proposing to retrocede the forts, dock-yards, etc. to the states applying for the return. Given by R.M.T. Hunter of Virginia in the Senate of the United States, 1861 January 11. Printed by Lemuel Towers, Washington, D.C.
89.13.6 Box 8 Printed inaugural address of Richard Yates, Governor of Illinois, to the General Assembly. Published by Bailhache & Baker. Springfield, Illinois, 1861 January 14
90.2.10 Box 10 Pamphlet printing of speech on the state of the union. Given by Lazarus W. Powell of Kentucky in the Senate of the United States, 1861 January 22. Printed at the Congressional Globe Office, Washington, D.C.
2009.7.7 Box 18 Certificate certifying the election of officers of Company H, Chicago Zouaves. Chicago, Illinois, 1861 April 24
89.1.9 Box 8 Pamphlet of official orders for organizing and encamping ten regiments, by Richard Yates. Springfield, Illinois, 1861 May 6
72.489 Oversize Box 21 Manuscript book of military endorsements by Confederate General Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard, Camp Pickens, Manassas Junction, Virginia, 1861 May 26-July 29. Records of applications for transfer, discharge, and promotion, as well as the outcome of whether these were granted or denied. Most signed by General Beauregard. This record book was taken near Fredericksburg, Virginia by Captain John M. Layton of the New York 21st Infantry. The book is fragile.
72.585 Oversize Folder 1 Certificate appointing John Charles Black to rank of Major of the 37th Illinois Infantry, 1861 August 15. See also 72.586, 72.587, 72.588, 72.635a and American Civil War Photographs and Images and Grand Army of the Republic Photographs and Images.
90.2.11 Box 10 Pamphlet printing of speech on restoring the union and peace. Given by Charles Sumner before the Republican State Convention at Worcester, 1861 October 1. Wright & Potter, Printers, Boston, Massachusetts.
72.553 Box 3 Handwritten notes, "Plan of the Expedition which set sail from Fortress Monrow Oct. 29th 1861 at five o'clock AM. Taken from the steam ship Philadelphia by W.M. Howell," circa 1861
91.5.6 Box 12 General Order No. 18 about rules and regulations for the troops in the camp by Joseph H. Tucker, Head-Quarters, Camp Douglas. Chicago, Illinois, 1861 November 1
90.2.4 Box 10 Printed message to the Congress of the Confederate States by Jefferson Davis. Richmond, Virginia, 1861 November 18
CPL-77 Art & Artifact Certificate appointing Thomas P. Haskins Assistant Quartermaster Captain for the Confederate States of America (CSA), 1861 November 11. Framed with print of CSA leaders.
89.1.8 Box 8 List of “roads leading southerly from Fredericksburg,” includes “Roads running from Fredericksburg,” “Telegraph Roads from Fredericksburg to Richmond” and “Orange and Fredericksburg Plank Road.” Fredericksburg, [Maryland], circa 1862
90.2.9 Box 10 Pamphlet printing of speech on conduct of the war. Given by Owen Lovejoy of Illinois in the House of Representatives, 1862 January 6. Scammell & Co., Printers, Washington, D.C.
72.396 Oversize Folder 1 Muster roll, Company B, 38th Regiment, 2nd Foot Volunteers, Colonel Benjamin F. Scribner, 1862 February 28
86.40.1 Box 8 G.H. McClurg’s oath of allegiance to confederacy and oath to enact duties of Justice of the Peace. Butler County, Alabama, 1862 March 10
72.550 Box 3 Special Order No. 35 by Hiram [?] Burnham, 1862 April 12
92.47 Box 12 Payment voucher for the servant, William, in service to William B. Hagan, 41st Ohio Infantry, 1862 May 31
90.2.14 Box 10 Pamphlet printing of letter from the Secretary of the Navy transmitting the official reports and documents connected with the engagements on the Mississippi River, which resulted in the capture of Fort Jackson, St. Philip, and the city of New Orleans, the destruction of the Confederate flotilla, etc. By Gideon Welles. Washington, D.C., 1862 June 6
72.586 Oversize Folder 1 Certificate granting promotion to rank of Lieutenant Colonel of the 37th Illinois Infantry, to John C. Black, 1862 June 9. See also 72.585, 72.587, 72.588, 72.635a and American Civil War Photographs and Images and Grand Army of the Republic Photographs and Images.
92.27 Box 12 Printed letter, Head-Quarters, Army of the Potomac marking the 4th of July by George B. McClellan, Major General, Army of Potomac. Harrison's Landing, Virginia, 1862 July 4
90.47 Box 12 General Orders No. 94 about rations to soldiers by Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff, by command of General Bragg. Tupelo, Mississippi, 1862 July 8
72.536 Box 3 Broadside, “Proclamation! Louisville, KY, July 13, 1862. It is ordered that every able-bodied man take arms and aid in repelling the Marauders. Every man who does not join will remain in his house forty-eight hours and be shot down if he leaves it. J.T. Boyle, Brig. General Commanding,” 1862 July 13
72.731 Oversize Box 23 Certificate appointing Charles C. McConnell as Corporal of the 24th Michigan Volunteers, 1862 August 15. [Writing faded to point of illegibility.] See also 72.717 and American Civil War Photographs and Images and Grand Army of the Republic Photographs and Images.
72.991.1-2 Oversize Box 22 Morning book and Clothing book for 77th Illinois Infantry, Company H, 1862 September-1864 September. 72.991.1 is the Morning book, which lists attendance for soldiers each morning, as well as monthly notes on events. 72.992.2 is the Clothing book, which lists the soldiers alphabetically by name at the beginning, and then monthly distribution of clothing items throughout. Soldiers had to sign upon receipt of the listed items.
72.418 Box 2 General Order No. 184 to assign N.P. Banks to the command of the Department of the Gulf, including the state of Texas. Signed E.D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant General. Washington, D.C., 1862 November 8
72.420 Box 2 General Orders No. 67 regarding supplies for the Army in Tennessee and Alabama. Signed G.M. Dodge, Brigadier General. Pulaski, Tennessee, 1862 November 12
90.12 Oversize Box 23 Periodical, Harper’s Pictorial History of the Great Rebellion, 1862 December 1
72.758 Oversize Folder 3 Broadside, Governor’s Message, by Thomas O. Moore, Governor of Louisiana, Opelousas, Louisiana, 1862 December 15
72.587 Oversize Folder 1 Certificate granting promotion to rank of Colonel of the 37th Illinois Infantry, to John C. Black, 1862 December 31. See also 72. 585, 72.586, 72.588, 72.635a and American Civil War Photographs and Images and Grand Army of the Republic Photographs and Images.
72.988.1 Box 20 Ordinance and clothing records kept by Milgrove B. Parmeter, 77th Illinois Infantry, Company H, 1863 October-1865 June. This notebook kept accounts of supplies and clothing received and distributed to soldiers.
72.494 Box 2 Farmers' and Planters' Almanac by L.V. & E.T. Blum, 1863
72.495.1-2 Box 2 Citizen's Parole form, 1863 (2 copies)
72.513 Box 2 Clarke's Confederate Household Almanac. H.C. Clarke, Bookseller and Publisher. Vicksburg, Mississippi, 1863. The calendar records various events of contemporaneous history, e.g. April 13, "Fort Sumter taken, '61" and May 3, “Tennessee seceded, '61.”
80.40.32 Box 7 Blank oath of allegiance to the United States. Baltimore, Maryland, 1863
89.31.2 Box 9 Pamphlet printing of “Speeches of the Hon. Henry May, of Maryland, delivered in the House of Representatives, at the third session of the thirty-seventh Congress,” printed by Kelly, Hedian & Peit, Baltimore, Maryland, 1863
89.31.5 Box 9 Pamphlet, “Trial of Abraham Lincoln by the Great Statesmen of the Republic. Council of the Past on the Tyranny of the Present. The Spirit of the Constitution on the Bench-Abraham Lincoln, Prisoner at the Bar, his own Counsel. [Reported expressly for the New York Metropolitan Record,]" 1863
90.27.1 Box 11 Pamphlet, “The Echo From The Army: What Our Soldiers Say About The Copperheads,” Loyal Reprints No. 1. Wm. C. Bryant & Co., Printers, New York, 1863
90.27.2 Box 11 Pamphlet, “The Venom and the Antidote,” Loyal Reprints No.2. [Wm. C. Bryant & Co., Printers, New York,] [1863]
87.8 Box 8 Pamphlet printing of 4 items, General Orders No. 1: The Emancipation Proclamation; General Orders No. 3: an act to facilitate the discharge of disabled soldiers from the army, and the inspection of convalescent camps and hospitals; General Orders No. 7: an act to improve the organization of cavalry forces; General orders No. 10: prisoner of war exchange. Washington, D.C., 1863 January 2
72.421 Oversize Box 22 Scrapbook of letters of recommendation for the promotion of John McArthur, 1863 January-February. Written by officers, troops, and governmental officials. Transcripts exist for most letters. One letter is dated 1865 January. Though it appears to have nothing to do with the rest of the scrapbook, the April 20, 1865, front page of TheMobile Daily News—Extra [Alabama] also appears, with headlines and articles about Abraham Lincoln’s assassination.
92.26 Box 12 Pamphlet, “Voices From The Army: The Soldiers Open Their Batteries On The Copperheads,” Loyal Publication Society, No. 5, 1863 February
72.695 Box 3 Pamphlet of printed message by John A. Logan to fellow soldiers. Memphis, Tennessee, 1863 February 12
90.2.12 Box 10 Pamphlet printing of speech about a bill to authorize the president to issue letters of marque and reprisal during war. Given by Charles Sumner of Massachusetts in the Senate of the United States, 1863 February 17
2018.15 Oversize Folder 6 Pay roll and muster roll for 120th Illinois, Company H, 1863 February 28
2018.16 Oversize Folder 6 Pay roll and muster roll for 41st Illinois, Company A, 1863 February 28
72.398
72.400
Box 1 Certificate to James Mullinene recognizing his Squirrel Hunter service, 1863 March 4. “Squirrel Hunters” was the name given to volunteers sent to the Ohio border to “repel invaders.” This certificate references the accompanying certificate of discharge (72.400), 1862 September. Both are signed by Ohio governor David Tod, Columbus, Ohio.
72.399 Box 1 Certificate recognizing Luther Johnson’s Squirrel Hunter service. Signed by Ohio governor David Tod, Columbus, Ohio, 1863 March 4
90.2.5 Box 10 Pamphlet, “What is Treason?” by U.S. District Court Judge Peleg Sprague. Printed for the Union League by Charles W. Swasey, Salem, Massachusetts, 1863 April
89.29.1 Oversize Folder 4 Muster and pay roll, Company H, 116th Illinois Volunteers, Captain James L. Dobson, 1863 April 30
86.40.31 Box 8 Pamphlet includes printing of “Message of the President [Davis] to the House of Representatives” about an act to allow minors to hold commissions in the army. Richmond, Virginia, 1863 April 16
72.755 Box 3 Report of committee on brigade drill, the Excelsior Regiment, 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 17th Army Corps. Vicksburg, Mississippi, after 1864 January 26. 124th Illinois Infantry. This regiment participated in the charge at Vicksburg, Mississippi, on 1863 May 22, and occupied the extreme advance position gained that day during the siege.
91.12 Box 12 Agreement to form company of infantry, signed by Citizens of Harrisburg, [Pennsylvania], 1863 June 24
72.426 Oversize Folder 1 Certificate of Promotion for George H. Grossman to rank of Major, 1863 July 2
72.414 Box 2 Inventory of effects for soldier Matthew Brophy, 20th Iowa Infantry. Vicksburg, Mississippi, 1863 July 9
72.985 Oversize Box 23 Illustrated certificate, “The Union Defenders Certificate,” certifying service of William B. Sease in 96th Illinois Infantry, 1863 August 1st
86.15 Box 7 Pamphlet, “Great Union Speech,” by John A. Logan, published by Tribune Book and Job Printing Office, Chicago, Illinois, 1863 August 10
90.2.13 Box 10 Pamphlet printing of speech of the Committee from the State of Missouri to President Lincoln. Washington, D.C., 1863 September 30
86.23 Oversize Folder 4 Broadside, “A Traitor’s Peace” by “A Democratic Workingman,” New York, 1863 October 30
72.1006 Box 4 Pamphlet, “The Chicago Copperhead Convention. The Treasonable and Revolutionary Utterances of the Men who Composed It. Extracts from all the Notable Speeches delivered in and out of the National ‘Democratic’ Convention…” by the Congressional Union Committee. Washington, D.C., 1864
90.23 Box 11 Pamphlet, “Address of Congress to the People of the Confederate States” by T.J. Semmes, J.L. Orr, A.E. Maxwell, J.W. Clapp, J.L.M. Curry, Julian Hartridge, John Goode, Jr., W.N.H. Smith. Richmond, Virginia, circa 1864
86.32 Box 7 Balance sheet showing provisions to hospital issued to R.L. Stanford, Surgeon, by Captain S.D. Henderson. A monthly statement of hospital funds. General Hospital No. 1, 1864 April
90.22.2 Box 11 General Orders No. 15 informing soldiers about being paid, by Solon A. Carter, Head Quarters, 3rd Division, 18th Corps d'Armee. Camp Hamilton, Virginia, 1864 May 1
72.732 Oversize Box 23 Certificate appointing Charles H. McConnell as Company Sergeant of the 24th Michigan Volunteers, 1864 May 3. See also 72.717, 72.731 and American Civil War Photographs and Images and Grand Army of the Republic Photographs and Images.
72.583 Box 20 Register and prescription book kept by George F. Wetherell, Surgeon, 26th Iowa Infantry, 1864 June 8-1865 June 4. Includes list of medical ailments and prescriptions delivered throughout the 26th’s movements, including Acworth, Georgia, Bentonsville, North Carolina, and Atlanta, Georgia. A list of casualties appears at the end of the book.
90.22.4 Box 11 General Orders No. 106 regarding the enlistment of African Americans through the Recruiting Service for U.S. Colored Troops, by George B. Drake, Major and Assistant Adjutant General, New Orleans, Louisiana, 1864 August 2
89.29.2 Oversize Folder 4 Muster and pay roll, Company A, 43rd Regiment, Colored Troops, Captain Jesse Wilkinson, 1864 August 30
90.6 Box 10 Pamphlet printing of message by [William T.] Sherman to the Mayor of Atlanta; speeches by [Joseph] Hooker, delivered in Brooklyn and New York, 1864 September 22; Letter by [Ulysses S.] Grant. Published in New York, New York, 1864 September 22

90.22.3

90.30

Box 11 General Orders No. 150, 1864 October 19. No. 150 includes General Orders No. 58, of which CPL also holds a standalone copy (90.30). These orders discuss the enlistment of African Americans in the military. Order 58 includes an excerpt of a September 26 letter from Louisiana Governor Henry W. Allen to Confederate Secretary of War James A. Seddon about the need to conscript African Americans into service. Order 58 follows this excerpt with Union Lieutenant Colonel C.T. Christensen’s October 11 instructions not to conscript African Americans into Union service but rather to treat them as refugees. In Order 150, Major George B. Drake expounds on Order 58 by directing African Americans who want to fight to the Recruiting Service for U.S. Colored Troops.

72.388

72.947

Box 1

Box 4

Pamphlet, “Is the War a Failure?” Including testimonies from Generals Grant, Seymour, Sherman, and Dix. From the National Union Executive Committee. Astoria, New York, circa 1864 October (2 copies)
72.486 Box 2 Special Order No. 260 signed by W.H. Taylor, Assistant Adjutant General. Head Quarters, Department Northern Virginia, 1864 October 29. Very faded and difficult to read.
72.945 Box 4 Discharge Papers of Zina G. Ward. 140th Illinois Infantry. Chicago, Illinois, 1864 October 29
2009.7.3 Box 18 Proclamation naming November 24, 1864 as Thanksgiving Day by Richard Yates, Governor of Illinois. Springfield, Illinois, 1864 November 18
72.752 Oversize Box 23 Certificate of Discharge for 2nd Lieutenant Francis H. Binz, 13th Illinois Infantry, 1864 December 15
90.2.6 Box 10 Pamphlet, “Statement to Congressional Committee on Treatment of Union Prisoners” by John Read, after 1864 December 19
72.389 Box 1 Special Field Orders No. 6 by General William T. Sherman, Savannah, Georgia, 1865 January 8. Includes information about the value of possessing Atlanta to the Union and to the Confederacy.
89.25 Box 9 Printed letter to the Soldiers of the Army of the James, Department of Virginia and North Carolina by Benjamin F. Butler, 1865 January 8
86.35 Box 7 Pamphlet including three items, “Message of the President to the Senate and House of Representatives of the Confederate States of America on the possibility of peace between the United and Confederate States” by Jefferson Davis, “Report of the Commissioners to the President of the Confederate States” and “Extract from Mr. Lincoln's message of December last, referred to in the foregoing report.” Richmond, Virginia, 1865 February 6
86.40.30 Box 8 General Orders No. 3 for the appointment of a General in Chief of the Armies of the Confederate States. Signed S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector General, Confederate States. Richmond, Virginia, 1865 February 6
72.484 Box 2 General Orders No. 2 by Robert E. Lee, 1865 February 11. These orders relate Lee’s eleventh-hour plea to deserters to return to their ranks.
92.32.A-B Box 12 General Orders No. 22 by Secretary of War E.D. Townsend, 1865 February 17. Includes a report that examined and corrected the way soldiers were recruited.
72.946 Oversize Box 23 Certificate appointing Zina Ward 2nd Lieutenant of Company F, 153rd Illinois Infantry, 1865 March 13
72.496 Box 2 Special Orders by Lieutenant General R.S. Ewell regarding paroled prisoners. Richmond, Virginia, 1865 March 21
72.588 Oversize Folder 1 Certificate granting promotion to rank of Brigadier General to Charles Black, 1865 April 9. “For gallant services in the assault on Fort Blakley [sic], Ala.” See also 72. 585, 72.586, 72.588, 72.635a and American Civil War Photographs and Images and Grand Army of the Republic Photographs and Images.
92.4 Box 12 Satirical death certificate for the Confederacy. Printed by Jas. B. Rodgers, 1865 April 9
72.419 Box 2 General Orders No. 67 states that Andrew Johnson became President. Signed W.A. Nichols, Assistant Adjutant General. Washington, D.C., 1865 April 16
92.37 Art & Artifact Certificate appointing George W. Bomford 2nd Lieutenant of 7th Regiment, 1865 May 1. Framed photograph of Andrew Johnson.
89.5 Box 8 General Orders No. 91 for organizing Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands. Washington, D.C., 1865 May 12
89.31.15 Box 9 Pamphlet printing of sermon “The Peace We Need, and How to Secure It,” given in the Tenth Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia. Published by James S. Claxton, 1865 June 1
72.417 Box 2 General Orders No. 34 to prohibit the sale of intoxicating liquors. Signed W.H.F. Randall, Assistant Adjutant General. Selma, Alabama, 1865 June 18
72.944 Box 4 Discharge Papers of Charles H. Brewster. Chicago Board of Trade 21st Artillery. Chicago, Illinois, 1865 June 30
72.282 Box 1 Report of Lieutenant General U.S. Grant of the Armies of the United States 1864-1865. Washington, D.C. Inscribed by Grant to Mrs. J.K. Smyth of New York. Includes documentation relating to the surrender at Appomattox, 1865 July 22
92.36 Box 12 Discharge papers for James York, Company D, 28th Iowa Infantry. Savannah, Georgia, 1865 July 31
90.37 Box 12 General Orders No. 137 about removing restrictions of intercourse and trade with the former Confederate States by President Andrew Johnson. Washington, D.C., 1865 August 31
89.31.8 Box 9 Pamphlet, “Letter of the Secretary of War communicating, in compliance with a resolution of the Senate of the 26th instant, the report of Major General J.H. Wilson on the capture of Jefferson Davis.” Washington, D.C., 1867 January 31. Describes events that occurred in 1865.
90.2.7 Box 10 Pamphlet, “Prison Life During the Rebellion. Being a brief narrative of the miseries and sufferings of six hundred Confederate prisoners sent from Fort Delaware to Morris' Island to be punished,” written by Fritz Fuzzlebug. Joseph Funk's Sons, Printers, Singer's Glen, Virginia, 1869.
91.17.1 Oversize Box 23 Broadside of letter to editor regarding Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, [1869]. Letter assigns responsibility to Stanton for abuse of Confederate prisoners, theft of 30,000+ bales of cotton during the occupation of Savannah, conspiracy to manipulate trial of Lincoln’s assassins, and more. Possibly written in Savannah.
86.40.6 Box 8 Official document transmitting bi-monthly return of deceased soldiers of the 5th Artillery for November and December 1872, by Henry J. Hunt. Fort Adams, Rhode Island, 1873 January 22
72.423 Box 2 Certificate of [military] Service for Howard B. Cushing, 1st Illinois Artillery, 1888 January 5
89.31.10 Box 9 Pamphlet, “Gettysburg: What They Did Here.” Illustrated historical guide book by Luther W. Minnigh, 9th edition, Reprinted 1912.
89.31.3 Box 9 Pamphlet, “Truth of War Conspiracy 1861” by H.W. Johnstone. Idyllwild, Georgia, 1921
72.434.A Box 2 Soldier's Prayerbook, belonging to Ephraim Nicholson, undated
72.497 Box 2 Blank form regarding Parole for Prisoners of War, undated

[Back to summary.]

Series 8: Slavery, 1785-1884, undated

90.2.24 Box 10 Pamphlet, “Thoughts on the Slavery of the Negroes.” Second Edition. Printed by James Phillips, London, Great Britain, 1785
90.2.22 Box 10 Pamphlet, “Observations on the Slave Trade and a Description of some Part of the Coast of Guinea, during A Voyage, Made in 1787, 1788…by C.B. Wadstrom, Chief Director of the Royal Assay and Refining Office, Sweden.” Printed and sold by James Phillips, London, Great Britain, 1789
90.2.23 Box 10 Pamphlet, “Notes on the Two Reports from the Committee of the Honourable House of Assembly of Jamaica…on the subject of the slave trade and the treatment of the negroes, etc. by a Jamaica Planter.” Printed by James Phillips, London, Great Britain, 1789
89.31.18 Box 9 Pamphlet, “Thoughts and Sentiments on the Evil of Slavery…” by Quobna Ottobouh Cugoano, native of the Gold Coast, Africa. London, Great Britain, 1791
74.3 Box 6 Letter from Joseph Brown to unnamed general about purchasing a slave family, 1795 March 6
90.2.15 Box 10 Pamphlet, minutes of the proceedings of the 3rd convention of Abolition Societies, Philadelphia. Printed by Zachariah Poulson, Jr., Philadelphia, 1796 January 1-7
74.19.1-2 Box 6 Receipt for the sale of John Randolph's slaves and engraved portrait. Virginia, 1797 December 6
90.2.20 Box 10 Pamphlet, “The Horrors of the Negro Slavery existing in our West Indian Islands, Irrefragably Demonstrated from Official Documents recently presented to the House of Commons.” S. Gosnell, Printer, London, Great Britain, 1805
2013.3.1 Box 19 Legal document establishing a 15-year, $500 indenture of servitude between Edward Hockensmith of Randolph County, Illinois, and an African American named Amos. Hockensmith died in 1818, and the indenture was passed on to Elias K. Kane. After the 15 years passed, Amos was granted his freedom. This legal document shows each stage in the indenture. Randolph County, Illinois, 1817 November 22; 1818 March 31; 1832 November 3
90.2.25 Box 10 Pamphlet, “Memoranda Respecting the French Slave Trade in 1820.” Printed by Ellerton and Henderson, London, Great Britain, 1820
89.31.21 Box 9 Pamphlet, “A Word to the Sons of Africa” by Luke Howard. Printed and sold by W. Phillips, London, Great Britain, 1822
90.2.21 Box 10 Pamphlet, “An Address to the Inhabitants of Europe on the Iniquity of the Slave Trade; Issued by the Religious Society of Friends, commonly called Quakers, in Great Britain and Ireland.” Printed by W. Phillips, London, Great Britain, 1822
90.2.28 Box 10 Pamphlet, “Correspondence between George Hibbert, Esq. and the Rev. T. [Thomas] Cooper, relative to the condition of the Negro Slaves in Jamaica, extracted from The Morning Chronicle. Also, a libel on the character of Mr. and Mrs. Cooper, published, in 1823, in several of the Jamaica Journals; with notes and remarks.” G. Smallfield, Printer, London, Great Britain, 1824
90.2.26 Box 10 Pamphlet, “An Address to the Public on the State of Slavery in the West-India Islands from the Committee of the Leicester Auxiliary Anti-Slavery Society.” Printed by Ellerton and Henderson, London, Great Britain, 1824
90.2.29 Box 10 Pamphlet, “Thoughts on the Necessity of Improving the Condition of the Slaves in the British Colonies, with a view to their ultimate Emancipation; and on the Practicability, the Safety, and the Advantages of the Latter Measure.” By T. Clarkson, Esq. Printed for the Society for the Mitigation and Gradual Abolition of Slavery Throughout the British Dominions. Printed by Richard Taylor, London, Great Britain, 1824
90.8 Box 10 Pamphlet, “The Injurious Effects of Slave Labour: An Impartial Appeal to the Reason, Justice, and Patriotism of the People of Illinois.” Re-printed by Ellerton and Henderson for the Society for the Mitigation and Gradual Abolition of Slavery throughout the British Dominions, London, Great Britains, 1824
90.2.27 Box 10 Pamphlet printing of speech by John Joseph Gurney, Esq. delivered at a public meeting, Norwich, Great Britain, 1824 January 28. About British colonial slavery. Printed by Ellerton and Henderson, London, Great Britain.
90.2.16 Box 10 Pamphlet printing of address of the Executive Committee of the African Mission School Society and the founding proceedings. Printed by H. & F.J. Huntington, Hartford, Connecticut, 1828
89.31.20 Box 9 Pamphlet, “College for Colored Youth, an account of the New-Haven City Meeting.” Published by the Provisional Committee of Philadelphia, 1831
89.13.7 Box 8 Pamphlet printing of an address to the Meeting of Friends, Philadelphia, regarding slavery, 1839 May 17
92.5 Box 12 Announcement about the Eleventh Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Fair to raise funds for the abolition effort. Boston, Massachusetts, 1844 February 8
86.7 Box 7 Political cartoon, “Where's My Thunder!” featuring Senators Henry Clay and Daniel Webster and the Fugitive Slave Act, circa 1850
87.6 Oversize Box 23 Broadside printing of the text of the Fugitive Slave Act, [1850]
74.18 Box 6 Letter from Charles Francis Adams to J. Orton of Williamstown, Massachusetts, concerning foreign born persons. Includes transcript. Boston, Massachusetts, 1855 February 20. Charles Francis Adams, son of John Quincy Adams, was a lawyer, politician, businessman and diplomat, and he served as minister to Great Britain during the Civil War. In this letter, Adams responds to Orton’s question whether slavery or foreign immigration was the more pressing issue of the day, referring to the negative sentiment felt in Massachusetts against immigrants.
89.31.9 Box 9 Pamphlet, “The South: A Letter from A Friend In The North. With Special Reference to the effects of Disunion Upon Slavery.” Printed by C. Sherman & Son. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1856
89.31.16 Box 9 Speech by Frank P. Blair, Jr., of Missouri, on the acquisition of territory in Central and South America to be colonized with free black people and held as a dependency by the United States. Delivered in the House of Representatives. Printed by Buell & Blanchard. Washington, D.C., 1858 January 14
86.40.18 Box 8 Letter to S.G. Dodge from Samuel Stowers about a runaway slave named Mary Mathews. Includes partial transcript, 1860 January 27
72.507 Box 2 Bill of sale for three slaves, owner, William Sells Co. New Orleans, Louisiana, 1861 April 26
72.506 Box 2 Notice for runaway slave, owner, Charles H. Gordon. Fauquier, Virginia, 1863 June 25
CPL-15 Oversize Folder 6 Poster, Reproduction of Emancipation Proclamation, circa 1863. Facsimile made for Sanitary Commission in Chicago.
90.7 Box 10 Pamphlet printing of speech by Francis P. Blair of Missouri delivered in the Senate of the United States, 1871 April 13. About enforcement of 14th Amendment. F. & J. Rives & Geo. A. Bailey, Reporters and Printers of the Debates of Congress, Washington, D.C.
75.21.3 Oversize Folder 6 Poster, Reproduction of Emancipation Proclamation, Lincoln Publishing Company, Chicago, circa 1872. “We hereby certify that the above is an exact copy of the original draft of the Emancipation Proclamation…. This immortal instrument was in the possession of the Chicago Historical Society at the time of the great fire in that city October 9, 1871, and destroyed with other articles of value formerly owned by the martyred president. …A fac-simile reproduction escaped the destroying flames, and from it the above copy is reproduced.”
90.42 Box 12 Speech, “The Constitutional Amendments and the Supreme Court,” by Thomas Francis Bayard of Delaware in the Senate of the United States. Washington, D.C., 1879 February 4
89.31.17 Box 9 Pamphlet, “The Exodus.” Address by Hon. John M. Langston, Minister Resident Port-Au-Prince, Hayti [Haiti], delivered at Lincoln Hall, 1879 October 7, before the Emigrant Aid Society, District of Columbia. Langston, a former slave, attended Oberlin College and was admitted to the bar in 1854. As clerk of Brownhelm Township, he became the first black person elected to public office in the U.S. in 1855. During the Civil War he helped to raise black regiments and served on the Oberlin city council and board of education. In 1868, as General Inspector of the Freedmen’s Bureau, he traveled the South investigating the condition of recently freed blacks. He organized the law school at Howard University in 1869 and served as Vice President and Acting President of the University. Langston worked for the District of Columbia's Board of Health, and in 1877 was appointed Minister to Haiti. In 1885, he returned as President of the Virginia Normal and Collegiate Institute, and was elected to Congress for one term in 1888. In this speech, Langston addresses the Emigrant Aid Society, which seems to have been engaged in helping Southern black people move to the North and West. Langston describes the continued subordination of freedmen to the old slaveholding class, due to the government’s failure to provide for economic as well as legal emancipation.
89.31.11 Box 9 Pamphlet, “The Gilgal of the Colored Race: A Baccalaureate Discourse, delivered in the Chapel of Howard University” by William Weston Patton. Washington, D.C., 1880 May 30. Previously a pastor, community aid worker, theology professor, newspaper editor, and always an outspoken abolitionist, Patton was elected President of Howard University in 1877. In this commencement address, he urges black people to abandon habits acquired under slavery which would hinder their intellectual and material progress. He raises one of the major themes of his administration: the need for a department of “mechanical arts” at Howard.
89.31.19 Box 9

Pamphlet printing of eulogy for John F.W. Ware, delivered in the African Methodist Church, Charles Street, Boston by William E. Matthews, of Baltimore. Introductory remarks by Governor John D. Long. Press of Geo. H. Ellis, Boston, 1881 April 11. Matthews was born into the free black community of Baltimore and gained wealth and prominence as a real estate agent and broker. While a clerk at Post Office headquarters in Washington, D.C. (the first black person employed by the department), he studied law at Howard University, graduating in 1873. He went on to successfully handle the financial affairs of such eminent black leaders as Frederick Douglass.

Ware, a Massachusetts clergyman, came to Baltimore in 1864. He worked for the welfare of former slaves, helping found a black teachers’ college and, as the public schools refused to accept black children, a statewide system of black elementary schools. So violent was the opposition to this movement that Ware travelled with armed bodyguards. Ware used Northern connections to seek books, funds, and teachers, and formed a cooperative relationship between Northern Unitarians and the African Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1872, he returned to Boston for reasons of health and there continued his philanthropic work.

91.9 Box 12 Postcard to T. Wentworth Higginson from James Freeman Clarke about sending a copy of “Anti-Slavery Days.” Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1884 August 21
72.756 Box 3 Broadside, “Rev. Elijah Parish Lovejoy was born at Albion, Maine, 1802 and murdered at Alton, Illinois, November 7 1837, A Martyr to Liberty.” Boston, Massachusetts, undated
72.968 Box 4 Pages from book regarding “Sale of a Family of Slaves in Washington City [Washington, D.C.].” Published by American Reform Tract and Book Society, undated
74.5 Box 6 Editorial letter by Benjamin Rush to the National Intelligencer about the question of slaves. Includes transcript. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, [year] July 23

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Series 9: Songs and Poems, circa 1820s-1876, undated

72.455 Box 2 Lyrics, “Song on the Death of Colonel [Elmer E.] Ellsworth, the Gallant Zouave,” J. Magee, Philadelphia, 1861. See also 72.459, 72.460 and American Civil War Photographs and Images and Grand Army of the Republic Photographs and Images, Series 1.
72.515 Box 2 “Hopkins’ New-Orleans 5 Cent Song-Book” by John Hopkins, 1861. Original wrappers. Contains a popular anti-Lincoln song, “Lincoln Going to Caanan.” This pamphlet also includes one of the earliest printings of the song “Dixie.”
89.12.1 Box 8 Poem, "Under the Clouds, and through the Sea" by Adeline D.T. [Dutton Train] Whitney. Includes transcript, 1861
89.4 Box 8 Handwritten copy of the "Battle-Hymn of the Republic" by Julia Ward Howe, circa 1862
89.12.3 Box 8 Poem, "After All" by William Winter. Includes transcript, 1862
89.12.5 Box 8 Poem, "Waiting" by A.F. Includes transcript, 1862
2007.52.F Box 13 Song lyrics, "The Rebel Flags Exhibited at the Capitol, February 22, 1862” by John A. Fowler. To the tune of "The Sword of Bunker Hill." 1862 February 22
72.952 Box 4 Song lyrics, "The Rebel Raid in Pennsylvania or That's Just So" published by James D. Gay, Army song publisher. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1863
89.28 Box 9 Songbook, "John Brown and The Union Right or Wrong Songster: Containing all the Celebrated 'John Brown' and 'Union Songs' which have become so immensely popular throughout the union." Published by D.E. Appleton and Co., Publishers, San Francisco, California, 1863.
2007.52.B Box 13 Song lyrics, "Tell Mother, I Die Happy." The last words of Lieut. Crosby, who was killed in his battery at Salem Heights... Words by C.A. Vosburgh, music by Jabez Burns. Published by S.T. Gordon, 1863 May 2
89.12.8 Box 8 Poem, "Before Vicksburg" by George H. Boker. Includes transcript, 1863 May 19
89.12.4 Box 8 Poem, "Boats of Grass." Includes transcript, 1863 July
89.12.2 Box 8 Poem, "Together." Tribute to Colonel Shaw and his troops of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment, who fell at the storming of Fort Wagner, South Carolina, 1863 July 18. By Anna C.Q. [Quincy] Waterson. Includes transcript.
89.12.16 Box 8 Poem, "A Carriers Adress [sic] for 1863-4" by Marianne Cabot Devereaux Silsbee. Includes transcript. Salem, Massachusetts, circa 1864
2007.52.M Box 13 Song lyrics, “The Veterans of '64.” To the tune of “The Enniskillen Dragoon.” Copyright R.B. Nicol. Washington, D.C., 1864
2007.52.O Box 13 Song lyrics, “New Patriotic and Comic Song, on the Sinking of the Pirate Alabama by the U.S. Gunboat Kearsarge, Captain Winslow” by Silas S. Steele, Esq. Tune, "Teddy the Tiler," or "Cannibal Islands." Copyright J. Magee. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1864 June 19
2007.52.L Box 13 Song lyrics, “The Battle of Cedar Creek.” Copyright J. Magee. Top of song sheet says "Liberty and Union Forever." Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1864 October 19
72.534 Box 3 Song lyrics, "On, On, On, The Boys Came Marching! (The Prisoner Free)" by Frederick George Root, circa 1865. Abolitionist George Root began his career in religious music publishing before turning his talents to writing patriotic war songs. He founded the firm of Root and Cady in Chicago, one of the dominant war music distribution houses. “Tramp! Tramp! Tramp!” was a popular prison tune, meant to lift the spirits of Union soldiers held in Confederate camps. A sequel, “On, on, on, the Boys Came Marching!” was inspired by Sherman’s liberation of the prisoners.
72.950 Box 4 Song lyrics, "Triumphal March of Sherman's Army into Atlanta and Subsequent Movements," in verse by W.F. Wilder of the 18th Wisconsin Infantry. Jefferson, Wisconsin, circa 1865
2007.52.G Box 13 Song lyrics, “Sequel to Prisoner's Hope. The Prisoner's Release or The Dear Old Flag Has Come.” William R. Smith, Agent. A.W. Auner, Song Publisher. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1865
92.49.A-B Box 12 Handwritten copy of song "The Blue and The Gray" by Private Dalzell; music by George F. Root. With a note of explanation on the composition of the words, 1867
90.39 Box 12 Songbook, "The Grant Songster for the Campaign of 1868." Published by Root & Cady, Chicago, 1868
89.12.13 Box 8 Poem, "Decoration." Includes transcript, 1873 May 30
89.12.18 Box 8 Song lyrics, "John Brown's Body" by W.H. Furness. Includes transcript, 1861. Media, Delaware County, Pennsylvania, 1875 June 29
89.12.9 Box 8 Poem, "God save John Bull" as a substitute for 'God save the King' by Richard Grant White. Includes transcript. New York, New York, 1875 July 23
89.12.11 Box 8 Poem, "Dirge For One who fell in Battle" by T.W. Parsons. Includes transcript. Scituate, Massachusetts, 1875 November 17
72.533 Box 3 Poem, "An Autograph with a Sentiment" by William Lloyd Garrison. Boston, Massachusetts, 1876 January 3
72.508 Box 2 Song lyrics, “Dandy Jim of Caroline,” undated
72.697 Box 3 Song lyrics, "General Logan and the Fifteenth Army Corps" by R.W. Burt of the 76th Ohio Infantry, undated
72.949 Oversize Box 23 Poem, “General Sherman’s Campaign in Georgia” by Corporal Granville Abbott of Company I, 31st Indiana Infantry, undated. Printed by Holman Printer, New York.
86.11.1 Box 7 Song lyrics, "Welcome Home." Printed by Charles Magnu. New York and Washington, D.C., undated
86.11.2 Box 7 Song lyrics, "A Yankee Man-of-War." Printed by Charles Magnu. New York and Washington, D.C., undated
86.11.3 Box 7 Song lyrics, "Young Recruit." Printed by Charles Magnu. New York and Washington, D.C., undated
86.11.4 Box 7 Song lyrics, "The 195th Pennsylvania Volunteers, Ballad No. 2." Printed by Charles Magnu. New York and Washington, D.C., undated
89.12.6 Box 8 Poem, "The Fall of Richmond" by Frances Anne Kemble. Includes transcript, undated
89.12.7 Box 8 Poem, "Requiem" by George Lunt. Includes transcript, undated
89.12.12 Box 8 Poem, "Driving Home The Cows" by Kate Putnam Osgood. Includes transcript, undated
89.12.14 Box 8 Poem, "To William Lowell Putnam after seeing two Photographs of him" by C.A. Bartol. Includes transcript, undated
89.12.15 Box 8 Poem, "The Echo Drummer" by J.W. De Forest. Includes transcript, undated
89.12.17 Box 8 Poem, "The Drummer Boy's Burial" by Julia C.R. Dorr. Includes transcript. Rutland, Vermont, undated
91.16 Box 12 Poem, "Jeff and the Rebellion" by William Daggett, undated
91.17.2 Box 12 Ballad, "Come Back Massa's in De Cold Ground." W.S. Fortey, General Steam Printer and Publisher, London, Great Britain, undated
91.17.3 Box 12 Ballad, "Miss Lucy Long." Printed and sold by T. Watts, Birmingham, Great Britain, undated
91.17.4 Box 12 Ballad, "Happy Are We Us Niggers So Gay." H. Disley, Printers, London, Great Britain, undated
91.17.5 Box 12 Ballad, "The Boatman of the Ohio." H. Such, Printer & Publisher, London, Great Britain, undated
91.17.6 Box 12 Ballad, "A Life by the Gally Fire." Hodges, from Pitts, Wholesale Toy and Marble Warehouse, London, Great Britain, undated
91.17.7 Box 12 Ballad, "I'm Off to Charlestown." H. Disley, Printer, London, Great Britain, undated
91.17.8 Box 12 Ballad: "Come Into My Canoe." Ryle & Co., Printers, London, Great Britain, undated
91.17.9 Box 12 Ballad, "Billy Pattison." H. Disley, Printer, London, Great Britain, undated
2007.52.A Box 13 Song lyrics, "Cheer! Boys, Cheer!" Undated
2007.52.C Box 13 Song lyrics, "Hail Columbia" and "America," undated
2007.52.D Box 13 Song lyrics, "Kingdom Coming." As sung by Dan Bryant. Root and Cady, Music Publishers. Chicago, Illinois, undated
2007.52.E Box 13 Song lyrics, "When This Cruel War Is Over," undated
2007.52.H Box 13 Song lyrics, “Let the Eagle Scream. Union Prisoners from Dixie's Sunny Land,” undated. To the tune of “Twenty Years Ago”
2007.52.I Box 13 Song lyrics, "A Soldier's Dream Before a Battle" by James R. Thomas of Company H, 1st Pennsylvania Reserves, undated.
2007.52.J Box 13 Song lyrics, "A Soldier's Dream Before a Battle" by a soldier of the Union Army, undated. To the tune of “Shells of Ocean” by James R. Thomas of Company H, 1st Pennsylvania Reserves.
2007.52.K Box 13 Song lyrics, “The Old Volunteer” by D. Gregory, undated. To the tune of "The Old Musketeer"
2007.52.N Box 13 Song lyrics, “The Last Goodbye.” Copyright R.B. Nicol. Gibson Brothers, Printers, Washington, D.C., undated
2007.52.P Box 13 Song lyrics, “The Rally Cry of Freedom.” To the tune of "Battle Cry of Freedom." James Magee Publisher. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, undated

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Series 10: Supervisory Committee for Recruiting Colored Regiments, 1863-1864

86.14.1 Box 7 Blank document stating that the application to the Free Military School is incomplete. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, circa 1863

86.14.2

92.25.2

Box 7

Box 12

Announcement of a meeting of the Supervisory Committee. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, circa 1863 (2 copies)
86.14.4 Box 7 Blank document to recommend a person for a position in the Colored Regiments. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1863
86.14.5 Box 7 Blank document granting admission to the Free Military School. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, circa 1863

86.14.6

90.41

Box 7

Box 12

By-laws of the Supervisory Committee for Recruiting Colored Regiments, circa 1863 (2 copies)
86.14.7 Box 7 Rules for the Government of the Free Military School, for applicants for command of colored troops. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, circa 1863
92.25.1 Box 12 Blank form letter of recommendation to Hon. E.M. Stanton for a position in the Colored Regiments. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1863
92.25.3 Box 12 Blank letter stating that communication has been received. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, circa 1863
92.25.4 Box 12 Blank letter to John H. Taggart, Esq., Preceptor of the Free Military School, giving permission for the bearer of the letter to enter the School. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, circa 1863
89.31.1 Box 9 "Report of the Supervisory Committee for Recruiting Colored Regiments." Published by King & Baird Printers, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 1864 February 3
86.14.3 Box 7 Announcement of a resolution about a committee adjourning being offered, at 1864 November 14 meeting, to be discussed at 1864 November 28 meeting. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1864 November

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Authors and Correspondents by Regiment

(Series is included in italics when not apparent)

11th Illinois Infantry
Nathanial Colver Kenyon

14th Illinois Infantry
Henry Backus

15th Illinois Infantry
George C. Rogers – General Letters

16th Illinois Infantry
John H. Roe – General Letters
James M. Welch

24th Illinois Infantry
Edward Bornemann – Miholotzy
Peter Hammerich – Miholotzy
J.V. Horn – Miholotzy
Joseph Kiss – Miholotzy
Albert Mauns – Miholotzy
Geza Miholotzy
Ludwig Toser – Miholotzy
Henry Wendt – Miholotzy

31st Illinois Infantry
John B. Spiller

36th Illinois Infantry
Robert Nathaniel McCutcheon

47th Illinois Infantry
Emery W. Smith – General Letters

51st Illinois Infantry
Otis M. Moody – Annie F. Noble

63rd Illinois Infantry
Marshall Chase

72nd Illinois Infantry
Lucian H. Wells – General Diaries

74th Illinois Infantry
Frank W. Fuller
Lafayette Pettibone – General Letters
Jonathan Stewart

75th Illinois Infantry
H.G. Keefer – Miholotzy

83rd Illinois Infantry
Myron E. Palmer – General Diaries

88th Illinois Infantry
Edward E. Babcock – Miholotzy
Levi P. Holden – Miholotzy
Richard Realf

92nd Illinois Infantry
Albert H. Colby – General Letters

96th Illinois Infantry
John Corson Smith

101st Illinois Infantry
William T. Humphrey

102nd Illinois Infantry
George P. Cumming

104th Illinois Infantry
Warren Hutchinson – General Letters

117th Illinois Infantry
Frank M. Goodman – General Diaries

126th Illinois Infantry
David W. Morris

8th Illinois Cavalry
Richard Ward – General Letters

9th Illinois Cavalry
William R. Wilder

2nd Illinois Battalion
Charles H. Fox – Humphrey

6th Illinois Militia Division [?]
George W. Moon – Hough

35th Indiana Infantry
John W. Potter

101st Indiana Infantry
Lucas F. Smith – General Letters

8th New Hampshire Infantry
T.C. Prescott – General Letters

17th New York Infantry
James M. Doig

45th Pennsylvania Infantry
Philemon Sloat – General Letters

209th Pennsylvania Infantry
Luther G. Sherman – General Letters

12th Wisconsin Infantry
George H. Butler – General Diaries

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