Alice Browning Papers

Alice Browning Papers, 1936-1998
Dates: 1936-1998 (bulk 1944-1985)
Size: 8 linear feet (12 archival boxes)
Repository: Chicago Public Library, Carter G. Woodson Regional Library, Vivian G. Harsh Research collection of Afro-American History and Literature, 9525 S. Halsted St., Chicago, IL 60628
Collection Number: 2000/08
Provenance: Gift of Barbara Cordell, 2000
Access: No restrictions
Citation: When quoting material from this collection the preferred citation is: Alice Browning Papers [Box #, Folder #], Vivian G. Harsh Research Collection of Afro-American History and Literature, Chicago Public Library.
Processed by: Melissa Barton, June 2008

Biographical Note

Alice Browning (née Crolley) was born in 1907 at Provident Hospital in Chicago, the first of three children of Liattah Marshall Crolley and Richard A. Crolley. The family was active at St. Mark’s M.E. Church at 50th Street and Wabash Avenue, where Richard Crolley was Sunday School superintendent and a trustee. In an autobiographical sketch, Alice Browning writes that she was married at age 16, presumably to George Franklin (Alice Browning’s teaching certificate gives her name as Alice Franklin). Franklin was a sociologist who would later contribute to the study that became Black Metropolis. The couple had one daughter, Barbara (who married WVON radio disc jockey Lucky Cordell). Alice took courses at Chicago Normal College before earning a B.Phil. from University of Chicago in 1931. While it is not clear how her marriage to George Franklin dissolved, it was at the University of Chicago that Barbara met classmate and fellow philosophy student Charles Patrick Browning. They married in 1936, while Charles was employed as the Illinois state director of the National Youth Administration. Charles would spend the rest of his career at the Chicago Defender, serving as vice president and director of advertising. In 1925, Alice suffered the first of several tragedies when her mother Liattah took her life; her father, Richard, died suddenly in 1938. Charles Browning died in 1954 after being struck in the head with a plane propeller in Little Rock, Ark., while on a visit to the Hot Springs Baptist Bath House, where he had assumed the post of manager.

Alice Browning received her Illinois teaching certificate in 1930 and taught at Forrestville Elementary School in the Chicago Public Schools until she retired in 1973. In 1941, Browning took a sabbatical year to complete course work for an M.A. in English from Columbia University. While there, she wrote her thesis on the African American novel before 1900 with eminent scholar Vernon Loggins. Browning also took courses at Northwestern University and the Social Services Administration at University of Chicago, but she never completed her M.A.

Though she later professed an interest in writing beginning at the age of 7, it was while a student at Columbia that Browning began writing short stories for publication. That year, she sent a story entitled “Tomorrow” to Esquire magazine, only to have it rejected. She had better success with the Pittsburgh Courier with a story called “New Years Eve: 1942.” Nevertheless, Alice’s experience with Esquire inspired her to create an outlet for African American writers to publish their short fiction. Her first attempt appeared in 1942, a journal called N.Y.P.S. (Negro Youth Photo Script). But it wasn’t until 1944 that she would hit upon a success, teaming up with her friend Fern Gayden, a social worker who had been involved with the South Side Writers Group in the late 1930s. With the help of Gayden and Parkway Community House director Horace Cayton, Browning gained permission from Richard Wright to reprint his story “Almos’ a Man,” which had appeared Harper’s Bazaar in January 1940. Borrowing $200 from her husband Charles, Browning launched Negro Story from her home at 4019 Vincennes Avenue.

Negro Story ran from 1944-1946, publishing a total of nine issues featuring nearly every prominent African American writer of the time, including Ralph Ellison, Chester Himes, Langston Hughes, Frank Marshall Davis, Margaret Burroughs, Richard Wright, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Owen Dodson. Browning published one of her own stories in nearly every issue under the pseudonym Richard Bentley. It was around this time that Browning completed the first draft of a novel, Chicago Girl , which she would continue to revise throughout her life.

When Fern Gayden stepped down as co-editor for the December 1944/January 1945 issue, citing her heavy case load, Alice Browning began to pursue ever more ambitious projects under the auspices of the new Negro Story Press. These included a children’s magazine modeled after the Chicago Defender’s “Bud Billiken” page entitled Child’s Play , the sole issue of which appeared in 1945. Lionel Hampton’s Swing Book , a guide to the contemporary music scene, featured biographical sketches and photographs of such key figures as Duke Ellington, Count Basie, and, of course, Lionel Hampton. Now extremely rare, it is considered a key text for understanding the influence of black popular music in the 1940s.

In 1953 Browning launched a new publication endeavor, The Browning Letter, which for three years ran feature articles and society gossip. Contributors included Frederick H. Robb (Hammurabi), a Pan-Africanist and famed street corner speaker, actress Louise Pruitt, who wrote a theater column, and novelist Chester Himes. In May 1954 The Browning Letter began including a section called “Zip” to celebrate “Zip girls,” one of whom was Browning’s own daughter Barbara Cordell. In 1963 Browning repackaged Zip as its own monthly magazine.

In 1970, nearing retirement from teaching at Forrestville, Browning met with fellow leaders in the African American community, including Judge Sidney Jones, Roma Jones, Leo Sparks, Marian Stevenson, Ilena Crushon and June Perryman, at the Washington Park Community Fieldhouse to plan the first annual International Black Writers Conference. Over the next decade the conference would grow into a three-day affair attended by such prominent writers as Lerone Bennett, Herman Gilbert, Lu Palmer, Oscar Brown, Jr., Henry Blakely, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sam Greenlee, Alex Haley, Vernon Jarrett, Haki Madhubuti, Dudley Randall, Margaret Walker Alexander and John Oliver Killens. Browning organized the conference until her health began to fail in 1984. She died October 15, 1985 at Crestwood Nursing Home in Chicago.

Sources

Bone, Robert. “Richard Wright and the Chicago Renaissance.” Callaloo. 28 (Summer 1986) 446-468.

Mullen, Bill. Popular Fronts: Chicago and African-American Cultural Politics, 1935-1946. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1999.

Scope and Content Note

The Alice Browning Papers consist chiefly in manuscripts, serials, pamphlets, photographs and ephemera from throughout Browning’s life, concentrated largely from 1968 to 1985, the years when she was organizing the International Black Writers Conference. The collection has been divided into eight series: Manuscripts , Biographical , Clippings , Organizations , Booklets , Serials , Publicity and Memorabilia , and Photographs and Audiovisual material. A single folder of correspondence, including a six-page letter about housing concerns signed “The Block Clubs of the South Side” and sent to President Jimmy Carter, is filed at the end of the Manuscripts series in Box 2.

The Manuscripts series is divided into manuscripts by Alice Browning and manuscripts by other authors. Included in the manuscripts by Browning are drafts of several short stories, essays, and poetry, as well as a complete draft of her novel Chicago Girl and a typescript draft and mock-up of her cartoon book, “It’s No Fun to Be Black” (the manuscript is titled “It’s No Fun to Be a Negro”). The section of manuscripts by other authors predominantly consists in play scripts by Robert M. Morris, who led sessions on drama at the International Black Writers Conference. Browning’s daughter Barbara Cordell starred in a production of Morris’s play Teacher Night Out. Also included in this section is a manuscript of Gwendolyn Brooks’s poem tribute to Browning, which Brooks read at Browning’s funeral in 1985.

The Biographical series includes a brief autobiographical sketch by Browning, her Chicago teaching and retirement certificates, and obituaries and Browning’s funeral program. It also includes a copy of Charles Browning’s funeral program and materials about George Franklin, Barbara Cordell’s father, and William West Franklin, her uncle.

The Clippings series is divided into clippings by Alice Browning, clippings about Alice Browning, clippings about the International Black Writers’ Conference and other clippings. For other articles by Alice Browning, see Serials.

The Organizations series includes material from Negro Story Press and the International Black Writers Conference. The material relating to Negro Story Press comprises solely a letter from the United States Copyright Office with instructions for applying for the copyright for Lionel Hampton’s Swing Book and publicity materials for Lionel Hampton’s Swing Book. Material for the International Black Writers Conference is organized by year and includes a program for nearly every year of the conference from 1970-1985 and then more sporadically through 1994. The file for the 15th anniversary conference in 1985 is particularly extensive. Some material from other conferences is included at the end of the IBWC subseries.

The Booklets series predominantly comprises poetry chapbooks that Browning collected throughout the 1970s. Most of these are quite rare.

The Serials series includes nearly complete runs of the magazines Browning edited: Negro Story , The Browning Letter , Zip , Black Writers News , and The Black Writer , as well as single issues of Child’s Play and Travel News . All nine issues of Negro Story are included. Researchers should note the irregular dating and numbering of The Browning Letter and Black Writers News . Browning’s review of Gwendolyn Brooks’s Report from Part One appears in the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History Newsletter ; her article “Sciffle Music and the Jazz Era” appears in the single issue of Villager .

Miscellaneous Publicity materials appear to relate to performers contracted for the International Black Writers Conference. Memorabilia includes several award certificates given to Alice Browning. A pair of checks from the Douglas National Bank, Chicago’s first black-owned bank, appear to have been given to Barbara Cordell as souvenirs in return for a donation to St. Mark’s M.E. Church (see the Correspondence in Box 2, Folder 14 for the letter that accompanied the checks).

The majority of the Photographs date from the International Black Writers Conferences of 1974, 1976, and 1978. Figures represented include Gwendolyn Brooks, Sam Greenlee, Vernon Jarrett, Glennette Turner, Haki Madhubuti, and Val Gray Ward. Audiovisual material comprises two VHS tapes of IBWC proceedings in 1985 and 1986.

Container List

Series 1: Manuscripts, ca. 1946-1985

The Manuscripts series is divided into manuscripts by Alice Browning, arranged alphabetically by title, and manuscripts by others, arranged alphabetically by author’s last name.

Manuscripts by Alice Browning
Box 1 Folder 1: “Analysis of the Business at Hand,” notes 1955
Box 1 Folder 2: “A Box Seat at the Harlem Riots,” ms. [n.d.]
Box 1 Folder 3: Chicago Girl, Chapter 1, ms. ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 4: Chicago Girl, Chapter 2, ms. ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 5: Chicago Girl, Chapter 3, ms. ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 6: Chicago Girl, Chapter 4 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 7: Chicago Girl, Chapter 5 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 8: Chicago Girl, Chapter 6 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 9: Chicago Girl, Chapter 7 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 10: Chicago Girl, Chapter 8 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 11: Chicago Girl, Chapter 9 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 12: Chicago Girl, Chapter 10 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 13: Chicago Girl, Chapter 11 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 14: Chicago Girl, Chapter 12 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 15: Chicago Girl, Chapter 13 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 16: Chicago Girl, Chapter 14 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 17: Chicago Girl, Chapter 15 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 18: Chicago Girl, Chapter 16 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 19: Chicago Girl, Chapter 17 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 20: Chicago Girl, Chapter 18 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 21: Chicago Girl, Chapter 19 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 22: Chicago Girl, Chapter 20 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 23: Chicago Girl, Chapter 21 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 24: Chicago Girl, Chapter 22 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 25: Chicago Girl, Chapter 23 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 26: Chicago Girl, Chapter 24 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 27: Chicago Girl, Chapter 25 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 28: Chicago Girl, Chapter 26 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 29: Chicago Girl, Chapter 27 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 30: Chicago Girl, Chapter 28 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 31: Chicago Girl, Chapter 29 ca. 1946
Box 1 Folder 32: Essay, Untitled, on Sex Education (fragment) [n.d.]
Box 1 Folder 33: “The Exorcism of America” 1974
Box 1 Folder 34: “Good Time Harry,” play script 1979
Box 1 Folder 35: “I Am Black” (fragment) [n.d.]
Box 1 Folder 36: “Introduction,” draft article about IBWC 1979
Box 1 Folder 37: “It’s No Fun to Be a Negro,” ms. 1968 [?]
Box 1 Folder 38: “Let There Be An Anti-Prejudice Day” 1974
Box 1 Folder 39: Life Plans (notes) 1956, 1978
Box 1 Folder 40: “Memories of St. Mark’s M.E. Church” [n.d.]
Box 1 Folder 41: New Voices in Black Poetry, galley 1973
Box 1 Folder 42: Notebook on the Bible 1978
Box 1 Folder 43: Notes, untitled [n.d.]
Box 1 Folder 44: “The Place in Chicago” [n.d.]
Box 1 Folder 45: Poetry, unpublished mss [n.d.]
Box 1 Folder 46: Poetry, unpublished mss [n.d.]
Box 1 Folder 47: “The Reason Black Johnny Cannot Read” [n.d.]
Box 1 Folder 48: “The Riot” [n.d.]
Box 1 Folder 49: Short Story, untitled (fragment) [n.d.]
Box 1 Folder 50: Speech, draft 1990
Box 1 Folder 51: “Why Are Hurricanes Named for Women” (fragment) [n.d.]
Manuscripts by Others
Box 2 Folder 1: S. Brandi Barnes, “Dedicated to the Children of Atlanta and Survivors” 1981
Box 2 Folder 2: Gwendolyn Brooks, “Alice Browning” 1985
Box 2 Folder 3: Alice Chase, “Grandma” [n.d.]
Box 2 Folder 4: Allen D. Jackson, “Theme: We Walk with Martin Luther King” 1985
Box 2 Folder 5: Mildred D. Johnson, “Alice Browning’s Blackness”
Box 2 Folder 6: Robert M. Morris, “African American Writers: The New Horizon for Playwrights” [n.d.]
Box 2 Folder 7: Robert M. Morris, “Character,” “The New Black,” “African-American,” “Conflict” [n.d.]
Box 2 Folder 8: Robert M. Morris, “Eulogy for Two” [n.d.]
Box 2 Folder 9: Robert M. Morris, “IBWC Dialogue Workshop” [n.d.]
Box 2 Folder 10: Robert M. Morris, “IBWC Radio Writing Workshop” [n.d.]
Box 2 Folder 11: Robert M. Morris, “Teacher Night Out” [n.d.]
Box 2 Folder 12: Robert M. Morris, “Teacher Night Out” [2nd copy] [n.d.]
Box 2 Folder 13: Portia Nelson, Poems n.d.
Box 2 Folder 14: Correspondence 1961-1995

 

 

Series 2: Biographical, 1939-1988

Biographical material relating to Alice Browning is followed by material about Charles Browning, Barbara Cordell’s father George Andrew Franklin, and her uncle William West Franklin.

Box 2 Folder 15: Chicago Teaching Certificate 1939
Box 2 Folder 16: Autobiographical Sketch 1961
Box 2 Folder 17: Tribute to Alice Browning 1973
Box 2 Folder 18: Retirement Certificate 1973
Box 2 Folder 19: Course Certificate 1973
Box 2 Folder 20: Alice Browning Testimonial materials 1978
Box 2 Folder 21: City Council Resolution 1985
Box 2 Folder 22: Tribute by Barbara Cordell 1985
Box 2 Folder 23: Obituaries 1985
Box 2 Folder 24: Alice Browning’s Funeral Program 1985
Box 2 Folder 25: Information about Alzheimer’s disease 1988
Box 2 Folder 26: Charles P. Browning Funeral Program 1954
Box 2 Folder 27: George Andrew Franklin biographical materials 1973
Box 2 Folder 28: William West Franklin, Jr. biographical materials 1978

 

 

Series 3: Clippings, 1936-1998

Box 2 Folder 29: Clippings by Alice Browning 1961-1981
Box 2 Folder 30: Clippings about Alice Browning 1936-1982
Box 2 Folder 31: Other clippings-IBWC 1977, 1987
Box 2 Folder 32: Other clippings-people ca. 1953-1998

 

 

Series 4: Organizations, 1946-1994

Negro Story Press
Box 2 Folder 33: Copyright application for Lionel Hampton’s Swing Book 1946
Box 2 Folder 34: General Information on Copyright 1963
Box 2 Folder 35: Lionel Hampton’s Swing Book Publicity ca. 1946
International Black Writers’ Conference
Box 2 Folder 36: IBWC-1970 1970
Box 2 Folder 37: IBWC-1971 1971
Box 2 Folder 38: IBWC-1972 1972
Box 2 Folder 39: IBWC-1973 1973
Box 2 Folder 40: IBWC-1974 1974
Box 2 Folder 41: IBWC-1975 1975
Box 2 Folder 42: IBWC-1976 1976
Box 2 Folder 43: IBWC-1977 1977
Box 2 Folder 44: IBWC-1978 1978
Box 2 Folder 45: IBWC-1979 1979
Box 2 Folder 46: IBWC-1980 1980
Box 2 Folder 47: IBWC-1982 1982
Box 2 Folder 48: IBWC-1983 1983
Box 2 Folder 49: IBWC-1985 1985
Box 2 Folder 50: IBWC-1986 1986
Box 3 Folder 1: IBWC-1990 1990
Box 3 Folder 2: IBWC-1991 1991
Box 3 Folder 3: IBWC-1993 1993
Box 3 Folder 4: IBWC-1994 1994
Box 3 Folder 5: IBWC undated materials [n.d.]
Box 3 Folder 6: International Black Songwriters Luncheon 1981
Box 3 Folder 7: Black Writers Conference, Pittsburgh, PA 1991

 

 

Series 5: Booklets, 1946-1985

Box 3 Folder 8: Alameen, Stephany Inua. Loveflame. 1981
Box 3 Folder 9: Armstrong, Naomi Young. A Child’s Easter. 1971
Box 3 Folder 10: Armstrong, Naomi Young. Expression I. 1973
Box 3 Folder 11: Atkins, Cheryl. Voices from My Heart. 1981
Box 3 Folder 12: Battle, Corey McQueen. Poems I. 1971
Box 3 Folder 13: Beach, Marion “Tumbleweed.” Come Ride With Me. 1970
Box 3 Folder 14: Ben-Izreal, Rahzahn [Ronald H. Johnson]. Poems, Short Stories, and Rhythms. 1979
Box 3 Folder 15: Birch, McLane. The Kandi Man. 1970
Box 3 Folder 16: Browning, Alice. Black ’n’ Blue. 1973
Box 3 Folder 17: Browning, Alice. It’s Fun to Be Black. 1973
Box 3 Folder 18: Browning, Alice. It’s No Fun to Be Black. 1972
Box 3 Folder 19: Browning, Alice. Fragment, Lionel Hampton’s Swing Book. 1946
Box 3 Folder 20: Browning, Alice. Lionel Hampton’s Swing Book. 1946
Box 3 Folder 21: Bruin, John. Thoughts Abroad. 1970
Box 3 Folder 22: Cage, Albert P. The Nothingness of War. 1947
Box 3 Folder 23: Caplan, Ron. Said A Meant. 1967
Box 3 Folder 24: Chicago Renaissance I. 1975
Box 3 Folder 25: Clemmons, Vincent. Sketches by Vince. 1973
Box 3 Folder 26: Cristen, Fatma. Poems of Blackness. 1970
Box 4 Folder 1: Dalton, Betty. 1973 Easter Anthology of Prayer Poems. 1973
Box 4 Folder 2: Danner, Margaret. Impression of African Art Forms. 1960
Box 4 Folder 3: Dean, Barbara Julian. The Key. 1970
Box 4 Folder 4: Demus, Myles. Poems to Ponder. 1976
Box 4 Folder 5: Diggs, Alfred. Naturally Black. 1968
Box 4 Folder 6: Dinwiddie, Faye Love. Song of the Mute. 1970
Box 4 Folder 7: Dominique, Otis G. I Know Why the River Cries. 1976
Box 4 Folder 8: DuSable Museum of African American History Publications Catalogue. ca. 1969
Box 4 Folder 9: G’Ra [George Hines]. Inside Head Out. 1976
Box 4 Folder 10: Glascoe, Melvin Marcus. Man Born of a Dark Woman. 1971
Box 4 Folder 11: Graham, J. Rodney. Nation. [n.d.]
Box 4 Folder 12: Griffin, Peggy Ann. Liberation Lyrics. 1984
Box 4 Folder 13: Hair Trigger III: A Story Workshop Anthology. 1979
Box 4 Folder 14: Hannah, Clayton L. A Collection: My Inner-Most Thoughts. [n.d.]
Box 4 Folder 15: Harris, Glenethel. Thoughts to Share. 1972
Box 4 Folder 16: Happel, Edward John. Sword Dance. 1981
Box 4 Folder 17: Harper, Robert V. J. A Gift of Love. 1974
Box 4 Folder 18: Hayes, C.L. Feel Me. 1972
Box 4 Folder 19: Hayes, Walter T. Casing Some Niggars. 1973
Box 4 Folder 20: Henderson, Samuel C. From Unfathomable Depths to Unreachable Heights. 1974 [?]
Box 4 Folder 21: Henighan, Eleanor J. The All Seeing Eye and the Hands that Pray 1974
Box 4 Folder 22: Hernandez, David. Waking Up: Despertando 1971
Box 5 Folder 1: Jackson, Spencer. Black Survival. [n.d.]
Box 5 Folder 2: Jamila-Ra [Maxine Hall Elliston]. The Good Book. 1971
Box 5 Folder 3: Jamila-Ra [Maxine Hall Elliston]. The Look at Yourself Book. 1977
Box 5 Folder 4: Kamau, H.B. When Men Gather. 1982
Box 5 Folder 5: Kilgore, James C. A Time of Black Devotion. 1971
Box 5 Folder 6: Kwasikpui, Doris B. A World of Their Own. 1973
Box 5 Folder 7: Lee, Don L. Think Black! 1969
Box 5 Folder 8: Lewis, Luevester. Jackie. 1970
Box 5 Folder 9: Luden, C.K. Coast to Coast. 1976
Box 5 Folder 10: LuTour, Lou. I Dreamed a Dream. 1969
Box 5 Folder 11: Macklin, Jacqueline. Falling Leaves. 1973
Box 5 Folder 12: Maida. Help! Somebody Save Me. 1973
Box 5 Folder 13: Marsh, Clifton E. Journey to Shamara. 1974
Box 5 Folder 14: Matanah. [Dorothy June Watkins]. Bits and Pieces. 1973
Box 5 Folder 15: McLaurin, Irma. Poems I. 1971
Box 5 Folder 16: McElroy, Njoki. Black Journey. 1975
Box 5 Folder 17: McGee, Pearl. Nigger I Love You. 1973
Box 5 Folder 18: McGee, Pearl. Twenty-Two Years on Welfare. 1972
Box 5 Folder 19: Mitchell, Joe H. Black Odyssey. 1975
Box 6 Folder 1: Mitchell, Joe H. Lovin’ You. 1974
Box 6 Folder 2: Mitchell, Joe H. Nature’s Child. 1974
Box 6 Folder 3: Mitchell, Joe H. fragment, O Woman. 1974
Box 6 Folder 4: Mitchell Joe H. O Woman. 1974
Box 6 Folder 5: Mitchell, Joe H. One Room Shack. 1973
Box 6 Folder 6: Mitchell, Joe H. Vignettes 1974
Box 6 Folder 7: Owens, Anne. Mike and Adrean. 1974
Box 6 Folder 8: Owens, Don Benn. The Most Controversial American and Why the Negro Race Lacks Unity. 1963
Box 6 Folder 9: Pahl, Stewart V. Humanism is Now! 1972
Box 6 Folder 10: Patterson, Lucille J. fragment, Sapphire. 1972
Box 6 Folder 11: Penny, Rob. Black Tones of Truth. 1968
Box 6 Folder 12: Perkins, Eugene. Black Expressions: An Anthology of New Black Poets. 1967
Box 6 Folder 13: Perkins, Eugene. Silhouette. 1970
Box 6 Folder 14: Pugh, Charles and Barbara. Dream of the Mask and Spear. 1975
Box 6 Folder 15: Randolph, Jeremy. Poems I. 1971
Box 6 Folder 16: Randolph, Jeremy. Poems II. 1971
Box 6 Folder 17: Rawls, Eugenia. A Certain Light. 1971
Box 6 Folder 18: Richardson, Nola. When One Loves. 1974
Box 7 Folder 1: Richardson, Sy. How to Survive in Hollywood. 1982
Box 7 Folder 2: Roby, June. My Soul. 1974
Box 7 Folder 3: Ruff, Robert. Accents on New Grass. 1970
Box 7 Folder 4: Salaam, Tayari kwa. Working Together We Can Make a Change. 1981
Box 7 Folder 5: Scott, Lewis E. The Coming of Lewis E. Scott. 1972
Box 7 Folder 6: Seals, Howard E. After ‘Yuh Mamma’ 1972
Box 7 Folder 7: Shah, Kimmah. The Giving of Love. 1979
Box 7 Folder 8: Simington, Ann Bowman. Love Is… 1970
Box 7 Folder 9: Smith, Dee. A Black Story: 8 Poems 1973
Box 7 Folder 10: Smith, Dee. Loving and Living. 1973
Box 7 Folder 11: Soul Session (poetry anthology) 1969
Box 7 Folder 12: Taylor, Rockie. Drum Song. 1969
Box 7 Folder 13: Tillman, Lise M. Of Violets and Blues. 1974
Box 7 Folder 14: Motley, Willard. Fragment, The Diaries of Willard Motley. 1979
Box 7 Folder 15: Muhammad, Elijah. Sayings of the Honorable Elijah Muhammad. [n.d.]
Box 7 Folder 16: New Voices in Black Poetry, 1972 1972
Box 7 Folder 17: New Expressions in Black Poetry, 1974 1974
Box 7 Folder 18: Trussell, Jake. After Hours Poetry. 1964
Box 7 Folder 19: Trussell, Jake. Collected Poems. 1957
Box 7 Folder 20: Urban Voices 1985
Box 7 Folder 21: Warner. M.W.S. The Missing Link. [n.d.]
Box 7 Folder 22: Whitaker, Hilda. With Foot in Mouth. 1973
Box 7 Folder 23: Whitaker, T. J. The Empty Road. 1971
Box 7 Folder 24: Williams, Jr., Edward. Liturgy of Edd. 1973
Box 7 Folder 25: Windham, Revish. Shades of Anger. 1972
Box 7 Folder 26: Windham, Revish. Shades of Black. 1970
Box 7 Folder 27: Zubena, Sister. Om Black. [n.d.]

 

 

Series 6: Serials, 1944-1991

Serials are arranged alphabetically by title. Note that issues of The Browning Letter and Zip are in Oversize Box 12.

Box 8 Folder 1: African American Publishers, Booksellers, and Writers Assoc. Newsletter 1991
Box 8 Folder 2: Aim 1981
Box 8 Folder 3: Assoc. for Study of Afro-American Life and History Newsletter 1973
Box 8 Folder 4: Black Family 1981
Box 8 Folder 5: Black Writers News 1971-1972
Box 8 Folder 6: Black Writers News 1972
Box 8 Folder 7: Black Writers News 1973-1975
Box 8 Folder 8: Black Writer, The 1980
Box 8 Folder 9: Black Writer, The 1981
Box 8 Folder 10: Black Writer, The 1982
Box 8 Folder 11: Black Writer, The 1983
Box 8 Folder 12: Black Writer, The 1985
Box 8 Folder 13: Black Writer, The 1986
Box 8 Folder 14: Child Play 1945, 1971
Box 8 Folder 15: Connection 1970
Box 8 Folder 16: Garland Court Review 1969
Box 8 Folder 17: Green’s Magazine 1973
Box 9 Folder 1: Negro Story 1944
Box 9 Folder 2: Negro Story 1945
Box 9 Folder 3: Negro Story 1946
Box 9 Folder 4: New Infinity Review 1974
Box 9 Folder 5: New Writers 1974
Box 9 Folder 6: Poetry 1973
Box 9 Folder 7: Protector, The 1949
Box 9 Folder 8: Soul Teleguide 1971
Box 9 Folder 9: Travel News 1969
Box 9 Folder 10: Villager, The 1961
Box 9 Folder 11: What’s Happening 1978-1979
Box 9 Folder 12: Business Materials for Serials 1949-1984
Box 9 Note: See Oversize Box 12 for issues of The Browning Letter and Zip.

 

 

Series 7: Publicity and Memorabilia, 1959-1983

Box 9 Folder 14: Publicity Materials 1977-1982
Box 9 Folder 15: Flyer, “How’s Your Sex Life” (play by Alice Browning) n.d.
Box 9 Folder 16: Memorabilia 1959-1983
Box 9 Folder 17: Chino and Los Flamencos materials 1983

 

 

Series 8: Photographs and Audiovisual, 1953-1990

For audiovisual material, see Oversize Box 12.

Box 10 001 A. Browning at IBWC, photo by J. Guidry 1973
Box 10 002 Alice Browning 1953
Box 10 003 A. Browning at Career Seminar at Malcolm X College 1974
Box 10 004 Alice Browning and unidentified at IBWC, from IBWC album ca. 1970s
Box 10 (Note: for a photocopy of the album from which photographs 004-044 were removed, see Oversize Box 12)
Box 10 005 IBWC, from IBWC album ca. 1970s
Box 10 006 Barbara Cordell at IBWC, from IBWC Album ca. 1970s
Box 10 007 Alice Browning, Dorothy Donnegan, and unidentified at IBWC, from IBWC album ca. 1970s
Box 10 008 Alice Browning, Dorothy Donegan, and unidentified at IBWC, from IBWC album ca. 1970s
Box 10 009 IBWC, from IBWC album 1974
Box 10 010 IBWC, from IBWC album 1974 [?]
Box 10 011 Dean Monti, Kim Kyp, Ed Happel, Alice Browning, from IBWC Album [n.d.]
Box 10 012 IBWC, from IBWC album 1974 [?]
Box 10 013 from IBWC album [n.d.]
Box 10 014 from IBWC album [n.d.]
Box 10 015 from IBWC album [n.d.]
Box 10 016 from IBWC album [n.d.]
Box 10 017 Alice Browning and unidentified, from IBWC album ca. 1970s
Box 10 018 from IBWC album [n.d.]
Box 10 019 from IBWC album [n.d.]
Box 10 020 from IBWC album [n.d.]
Box 10 021 Barbara Julian Dean, unidentified, and Alice Browning, Washington D.C., from IBWC album 1971
Box 10 022 IBWC, from IBWC album ca. 1970s
Box 10 023 IBWC, from IBWC album ca. 1970s
Box 10 024 IBWC, from IBWC album ca. 1970s
Box 10 025 Sam Greenlee at IBWC, from IBWC album ca. 1970s
Box 10 026 Gwendolyn Brooks, from IBWC Album, photograph by Ruby Dee ca. 1970s
Box 10 027 from IBWC album, photograph by Ruby Dee [n.d.]
Box 10 028 Alice Browning at IBWC, from IBWC album ca. 1970s
Box 10 029 Alice Browning at IBWC, from IBWC album ca. 1970s
Box 10 030 Alice Browning and unidentified, from IBWC album 1968
Box 10 031 IBWC, from IBWC album ca. 1970s
Box 10 032 Al Duckett, Alice Browning, Sam Greenlee, Sidney Jones, Connie Hedgepath, Barbara Julian Dean, Spencer Jackson, and Alice Browning, from IBWC Album ca. 1970s
Box 10 033 from IBWC album [n.d.]
Box 10 034 IBWC, from IBWC album ca. 1970s
Box 10 035 IBWC, from IBWC album ca. 1970s
Box 10 036 IBWC, from IBWC album ca. 1970s
Box 10 037 IBWC, from IBWC album ca. 1970s
Box 10 038 IBWC, from IBWC album ca. 1970s
Box 10 039 IBWC, from IBWC album ca. 1970s
Box 10 040 from IBWC album [n.d.]
Box 10 041 from IBWC album [n.d.]
Box 10 042 from IBWC album [n.d.]
Box 10 043 Shirley Graham, from IBWC album [n.d.]
Box 10 044 Alice Browning and unidentified, from IBWC album [n.d.]
Box 10 045 Alice Browning at IBWC, photograph by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 046 Darwin Walton at IBWC, photograph by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 047 Glennette Turner (Children’s Literature) at IBWC, photograph by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 048 IBWC, photo by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 049 IBWC, photo by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 050 Haki Madhubuti at IBWC, photo by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 051 Orlando White (Producer for WGN) at IBWC, photo by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 052 Reginald Hayes (Public Relations Dir., Ebony Magazine) at IBWC, photo by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 053 Kala Akbar (Assoc. Ed., Black Journalism Review) at IBWC, photo by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 054 IBWC, photo by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 055 Alice Browning at IBWC, photograph by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 056 Madelyne Blunt (Coordinator ASALH) at IBWC, photo by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 057 Madelyne Blunt (Coordinator ASALH) at IBWC, photo by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 058 Alice Browning at IBWC, photograph by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 059 Alice Browning at IBWC, photograph by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 060 IBWC, photo by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 061 Naomi Millender at IBWC, photo by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 062 Frances Ward (L.A. Times reporter, founder of Kumba workshop) at IBWC, photo by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 063 Val Gray Ward (Founder, Kumba Workshop), at IBWC, photo by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 064 Alice Browning at IBWC, photograph by Robert Williams 1976
Box 10 065 cover of 1976 IBWC album 1976
Box 10 066 Alice Browning at IBWC 1978
Box 10 067 IBWC 1978
Box 10 068 Ivan vanSertima at IBWC 1978
Box 10 069 IBWC 1978
Box 10 070 IBWC 1978
Box 10 071 Eugene Redmond at IBWC 1978
Box 10 072 IBWC 1978
Box 10 073 IBWC 1978
Box 10 074 IBWC 1978
Box 10 075 IBWC 1978
Box 10 076 IBWC 1978
Box 10 077 IBWC 1978
Box 10 078 IBWC 1978
Box 10 079 IBWC 1978
Box 10 080 IBWC 1978
Box 10 081 IBWC 1978
Box 10 082 IBWC 1978
Box 10 082a IBWC 1978
Box 11 083 Eugene Winslow at IBWC, photograph by Barbara Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 084 Alice Browning, unidentified, and Vernon Jarrett at IBWC, photo by Barbara Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 085 IBWC dinner, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 086 IBWC dinner, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 087 Alice Browning at IBWC dinner, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 088 IBWC dinner, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 089 IBWC, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 090 IBWC, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 091 Gwendolyn Brooks and Nora Brooks at IBWC, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 092 Nora Brooks at IBWC, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 093 Sam Greenlee at IBWC, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 094 IBWC, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 095 Vernon Jarrett at IBWC, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 096 IBWC, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 097 Jesse Evans and unidentified at IBWC dinner, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 098 IBWC dinner, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 099 Alice Browning at IBWC dinner, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 100 Sam Greenlee and Alice Browning at IBWC, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 101 Sam Greenlee and Alice Browning at IBWC, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 102 Gwendolyn Brooks at IBWC, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 103 Glennette Turner at IBWC, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 104 IBWC, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 105 IBWC, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 106 Lake Shore Drive from McCormick Place, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 107 Lake Shore Drive from McCormick Place, photo by B. Cordell [?] 1978
Box 11 108 Alice Browning at IBWC [n.d.]
Box 11 109 Alice Browning at IBWC, photo by Ruby Dee [?] [n.d.]
Box 11 110 IBWC [n.d.]
Box 11 111 IBWC [n.d.]
Box 11 112 IBWC [n.d.]
Box 11 113 Glennette Turner and Mildred Johnson at IBWC [n.d.]
Box 11 114 IBWC [n.d.]
Box 11 115 unidentified funeral [n.d.]
Box 11 116 unidentified funeral [n.d.]
Box 11 117 unidentified funeral [n.d.]
Box 11 118 negatives from unidentified funeral [n.d.]
Box 11 119 negatives from unidentified funeral [n.d.]
Box 11 120 unidentified funeral [n.d.]
Box 11 121 negative from unidentified funeral [n.d.]
Box 11 122 negative from unidentified funeral [n.d.]
Box 11 123 Colostine Boatwright [n.d.]
Box 11 124 Colostine Boatwright [n.d.]
Box 11 125 Colostine Boatwright [n.d.]
Box 11 126 Colostine Boatwright [n.d.]
Box 11 127 Colostine Boatwright [n.d.]
Box 11 128 Colostine Boatwright [n.d.]
Box 11 129 Harsh Collection Exhibit: Chicago’s Black Writers and Publishers
Box 11 130 Harsh Collection Exhibit: Chicago’s Black Writers and Publishers
Box 11 131 Harsh Collection Exhibit: Chicago’s Black Writers and Publishers
Box 11 132 Harsh Collection Exhibit: Chicago’s Black Writers and Publishers
Box 11 133 Harsh Collection Exhibit: Chicago’s Black Writers and Publishers
Box 11 134 Michael Flug at desk of Harsh Collection
Box 11 135 Harsh Collection Exhibit: Chicago’s Black Writers and Publishers

 

 

Oversize

Box 12 VHS tape, Tribute to Alice Browning IBWC 1986 1986
Box 12 VHS tape, IBWC 15th anniversary, July 1, 1985 1985
Box 12 Folder 1: The Browning Letter 1953
Box 12 Folder 2: The Browning Letter 1954
Box 12 Folder 3: The Browning Letter 1955
Box 12 Folder 4: Zip 1963
Box 12 Folder 5: Zip 1964
Box 12 Folder 6: Browning Letter fragments n.d.
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