Read Like a Zombie

Need help recommending books to your zombie friends? I visited with one recently and have some tips to share. 

Zombies like brains. They find them delicious. In a zombie's personal library, you'll often find an entire shelf devoted to the subject, including such mouth-watering recent examples as Unthinkable: An Extraordinary Journey Through the World's Strangest Brains by Helen Thomson and The Disordered Mind: What Unusual Brains Tell Us about Ourselves by Eric R. Kandel, but a recent favorite has been Do No Harm by brain surgeon Henry Marsh. My zombie friend said it wants you to "read up on brain health to keep yours nice and tasty, er, healthy."

Zombies struggle with their conversation skills. Touchingly, Zombie loves to watch TED Talks for inspiration and highly recommends the book TED Talks by Chris Anderson. Zombies generally love books on interpersonal communication and public speaking.

Zombies have well-known agility issues. Brain-hunting is quite a challenge when you're lumberingly slow. So I highly recommend Eiko's Even the Stiffest People Can Do the Splits, a favorite work of the recent Japanese self-help book trend. Zombies can find lots more titles on stretching and yoga at the library. Speaking of self-help, as my fellow blogger Gloriane pointed out, zombies have zero interest in the recent trend of "over it" advice books like The Life-changing Magic of Not Giving A F*ck because they've got that mastered.

Zombies lack fashion sense. They tend to stick with a single look until it's literally worn out. I've had no luck getting zombies to read high-fashion books, but when I showed Zombie Scott Schuman's street fashion classic The Sartorialist, I swear I saw a flicker of interest flash across its face. Then again, the zombie might have just been hungry, so I left a pile of brain books and took my leave.

Of course, humans find zombies a fascinating subject in themselves. Find books, movies and more about zombies.

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