It’s a Landslide: 5 Articles About Presidential Elections

You won't find cliffhangers, squeakers or hanging chads here. Travel back in time to these indisputable presidential election victories. Read the actual front-page news articles or, in some cases, browse the entire newspaper (including the advertisements) to see what else was going on at the time.

You can read these articles using CPL's Online Resources, but I've noted if an article is available freely on the web.

McKinley and Roosevelt: Standard-Bearers of Prosperity Gain Victory That Forever Crushes Out Bryanism
The San Francisco Call, November 7, 1900 (This article is available on Chronicling America via the Library of Congress.)
McKinley won re-election in 1900. He received 7.2 million popular votes to 6.3 million for William Jennings Bryan and 292 Electoral College votes to 155 for Bryan.

Lyndon Lashes Backlash—It's Landslide!
Chicago Daily Defender, November 4, 1964
In 1964, Lyndon B. Johnson received 43.1 million popular votes to 27.1 million for Barry Goldwater and 486 Electoral College votes to 52 for Goldwater.

A Nixon Sweep by George Tagge
Chicago Tribune, November 8, 1972
Richard Nixon won re-election in 1972. He received 47.1 million popular votes to 29.1 million for George S. McGovern and 520 Electoral College votes to 17 for McGovern.

Reagan Landslide! by F. Richard Ciccone
Chicago Tribune, November 5, 1980
In 1980, Ronald Reagan received 43.9 million popular votes to 35.4 million for Jimmy Carter and 489 Electoral College votes to 49 for Carter.

Historic Victory: Obama Elected Nation's First African-American President in a Romp by Scott Helman and Michael Kranish
The Boston Globe, November 5, 2008
In 2008, Barack Obama received 69.4 million popular votes to 59.9 million for John McCain and 365 Electoral College votes to 173 for McCain.

For more presidential election data, go to the American Presidency Project.

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