Kids, Tell Your Story Through Dance

Do you like to move your body? Do you ever like to dance? Dancing can be something you do in your room or with your family. You can dance your feelings out. Or you can dance in public! Some people really love to dance for other people. Dance is an art, and there are plenty of different ways to dance.

When you think about dance, you might think about ballet. 

Firebird : Ballerina Misty Copeland Shows A Young Girl How to Dance Like the Firebird: The amazing Misty Copeland shares her story of becoming a dancer with another young ballerina. Learn more about the dancers who inspired her in Black Ballerinas.

Sofía Acosta Makes A Scene: Sofia's family is all Cuban ballet dancers but she struggles to stay with the beat. What will her family think if she can't dance in The Nutcracker this year? Will she still be an Acosta? The Acosta family is inspired by Alicia Alonso, the famous Cuban dancer. Learn the real story of how Alicia Alonso Dances on and becomes a famous prima ballerina.

What about more modern dances? 

¡Mambo Mucho Mambo! In the 1940s, people of different races and religions didn't dance together. Until the mambo was invented and Latin jazz became popular. Then all were invited to listen and dance the mambo together.

The Electric Slide and Kai: Kai is ready to do the classic line dance, the electric slide, so that he can get his dance nickname from his grandfather. Everyone else has one! Will this wedding be the day Kai gets his special nickname?

Dance is also an important ritual for many people and cultures.

On Powwow Day, River has been sick and she is so sad not to dance. But the bam, bam, bam, bam of the drums still moves her heart even though her feet can't move this year. Next year, she'll be ready.

Find more dancers in this booklist and Get Up and Get Moving!

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