Into the Void: 5 Articles on the Black Hole

On April 10 of this year, the National Science Foundation publicly announced the capture of the very first picture of a Black Hole taken by the Event Horizon Telescope. While scientists have been studying this phenomenon for many years, they hadn't ever actually seen one until recently. I find it very exciting that there is now official documentation of the Black Hole. In a galaxy far, far away, there is something a billion times more massive than our sun. It's an area that, once entered, will not emit anything, not even light, thus changing the nature of time and space. Maria Popova, commenting on the news, has said: "...we are peering into the gun barrel of time itself."

Use CPL's Online Resources to understand the chronology and significance of this scientific achievement:

"Hole Lot of Love for an Astronomical Triumph" by Seth Borenstein (The Age Magazine, April 2019)

Praise for the first ever picture of this mysterious phenomenon.

"First Ever Black Hole Image Released" by Tblisi (GHN News Agency, April 10, 2019)

Here's some basic information regarding the new image. What is it? Some say it looks like a doughnut. Even scientists admit it looks a bit like the eye of Sauron from the Lord of the Rings.

"Inside the Event Horizon Telescope" by Jeff Mangum (Mercury Magazine, Winter 2018)

Learn how the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) works through interferometry.

"Black hole image: Meet the Woman who played a Key Role in the Breakthrough" (Asia News Monitor, April 12, 2019)

Dr. Katie Bouman is a scientist that we all should know. She led the team to the algorithm that ultimately made this picture possible.

"Into the Abyss" by Mika McKinnon (Mercury Magazine, Winter 2017)

Find detailed information about the Black Hole phenomenon to help you understand the concept in its entirety. 

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