Crowdfunding Your Small Business

Funding your small business is perhaps the most important aspect of owning and running a business. While some have access to capital through their own personal wealth, family and friends, or access to credit, others sometimes need to think outside the box.

One increasingly popular and non-traditional way to raise funds is through crowdfunding. If you’ve never heard of this term before, it’s an alternative strategy to raising capital via social media using web-based platforms, and relies heavily on your company’s story to garner donations.

To learn more about crowdfunding, take a look at these sources.

4 Ways To Turn Your Business Idea Into Millions identifies and explains the type of funding that's generally available to all potential entrepreneurs, including crowdfunding. 

Getting Started in Crowdfunding answers the questions 'what is crowdfunding' and 'how do i get started', and includes the types of crowdfunding that are now available in the marketplace. 

The Crowdfunding Handbook: Former Wall Street attorney and ecommerce expert Clifford Ennico, Jr. provides step-by-step instructions on how to use crowdfunding to your advantage. 

A Crowdfunder's Strategy Guide: Jamie Stegmaier uses his experience in successfully funding a game company on the web-based crowdfunding platform, Kickstarter, as a guide for you to start your own campaign. 

The Crowdfunding Revolution: Using the power of the internet, your pool of potential investors is no longer limited. The Crowdfunding Revolution gives an overview of what crowdfunding is, how you can market to the crowd and the legal aspects of the venture. 

The Kickstarter Handbook: Written by business journalist Don Steinberg, this book explains the ins and outs of a successful Kickstarter campaign using a series of case studies that focus on both the successes and the difficulties in making your passion your reality. 

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