Peaceniks

John Lennon told us to give peace a chance. He was shot. Martin Luther King, Jr. promoted nonviolent protest. He was shot, too. So was Gandhi, and I'd rather not get into what they did to Jesus. What I'm saying is that peace is hard. If, like I did, you try to find books about […]

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Time Has Come Today

In a world of work schedules, TV schedules, phone reminders, personalized alarms and all the clocks harassing you every time you look at a wall, it's easy to forget how accustomed we are to time. We barely know what it is, but it means so much. Every now and then, it's nice to take the time to […]

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Share the Drama with Your Mama: Junior Adaptations of Adult Bestsellers

Hidden Figures

Have you ever been curious about what's on the other side of the library? The adult side? You don't have to wonder any longer. Now you can feed your curiosity with these junior adaptations of adult bestsellers. I have a feeling you've already heard of the first book on our list. Hidden Figures is the true story of […]

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They Lived and Laughed and Sometimes Left: Cancer Stories

Cancer is no joke. Fighting it isn't, either, especially if you're young. However, there are some moments of humor, if you're with the right people and looking for them. These are books about people who developed cancer at a young age and lessons learned. It's Okay to Laugh (Crying is Cool, Too) by Nora McInery Purmort is […]

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Your Bellevue Reading List

David Oshinsky has written a lucid history of the storied Bellevue Hospital, naturally titled Bellevue. It also deals with the history of medicine and New York City, which Bellevue is intrinsically part of. From its days as the infirmary of a poorhouse to Hurricane Sandy (the only time in Bellevue's history that it closed its doors), […]

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Feminist Voices You Should Know

Feminist Voices

We've read many great memoirs, collections of essays and cultural analyses by female authors in recent years. Here are some feminist voices that kept the conversation going this year. In her honest and incisive memoir Shrill, Lindy West examines internet culture and body image through a feminist lens. Her absorbing essays and polemic against rape jokes in comedy combine Roxane Gay's […]

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Around the Worlds

There's a neat subgenre of history that wants to tell the entire story of human civilization. A lot of the older ones are very much focused on Europe, with a chapter or two devoted to those vague people somewhere else who were doing whatever. For some reason, I find this combination of bias and ambition strangely charming, and […]

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All In the Family

What would it take to build a dynasty? To gather together ambitious relatives, pump out ambitious children and use your collective skill to own a good chunk of the world? You'd figure these people would just wind up killing each other in the end, but some can make it work. I don't quite have the same drive […]

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The How and the Why: Stanley Fish

I like to think of myself as a rather well-read person, but I had not heard of Stanley Fish until I picked up his latest book. Turns out, he's a bit of a polymath and Dean Emeritus at the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences at UIC, among other posts. While Fish writes a great deal about English literature and […]

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